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Results for 'gardening'

Results 1 - 4 of 4

Effect of horticultural therapy on wellbeing among dementia day care programme participants: a mixed-methods study

HALL Jodi, et al
2018

Fourteen people attending an adult day programme were recruited to a structured horticultural therapy programme which took place over 10 weeks. The effects were assessed using Dementia Care Mapping and questionnaires completed by family carers. High levels of wellbeing were observed while the participants were engaged in horticultural therapy, and these were sustained once the programme was completed. This study adds to the growing evidence on the benefits of horticultural therapy for people with dementia who have enjoyed gardening in the past.

Exposure to nature gardens has time-dependent associations with mood improvements for people with mid- and late-stage dementia

WHITE Piran CL., et al
2018

Exposure to green space and nature has a potential role to play in the care of people with dementia, with possible benefits including improved mood and slower disease progression. In this observational study at a dementia care facility in the UK, we used carer-assessed measures to evaluate change in mood of residents with mid- to late-stage dementia following exposure to a nature garden. We found that exposure to nature was associated with a beneficial change in patient mood. There was a non-linear relationship between time spent outdoors and mood outcome. Improvements in patient mood were associated with relatively short duration exposures to nature, and no additional measureable increases in mood were found with exposures beyond 80–90 minutes duration. Whilst further investigation is required before causality can be determined, these results raise important questions for policy about the integration of outdoor space into the design of dementia care facilities and programmes.

Introduction to the research on: the impact and effectiveness of meaningful activity for people with mental health problems

HARFLETT Naomi, JENNINGS Yasmin, LINSKY Kate
2017

This short scoping review identifies research on the impact and effectiveness of meaningful activity for people with mental health problems. Due to the lack of consensus on what is meant by the terms ‘meaningful activity’ or ‘meaning activity’, the review focused on different activities, such as unpaid work and volunteering, horticulture, woodwork, arts and music, physical exercise and leisure. Searches were on a range of databases, including Social Care Online, and organisational websites for UK based research published from 2000. The review provides an overview of the quantity and quality of the research and a table summarising the 33 studies reviewed and their key findings. It also provides a summary of areas identified for future research. The review found that in the vast majority of the studies found people experience positive outcomes from participating in meaningful activity or occupation. These included: a sense of purpose or meaning to life, a structure or routine to the day, acquisition of skills, a sense of identity, social interaction and increased social networks, improved wellbeing, access to employment or education, improved confidence and improved self-esteem. However it notes that due to the high proportion of small-scale qualitative research studies, positive outcomes may be overstated. It also found no conclusive evidence to show that volunteering resulted in positive outcomes for people with mental health problems.

Vocational rehabilitation in mental health services: evaluating the work of a social and therapeutic horticulture community interest company

FIELDHOUSE Jon, PARMENTER Vanessa, HORTOP Alice
2014

Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to report on an action inquiry (AI) evaluation of the Natureways project, a time-limited collaboration between an NHS Trust Vocational Service and a voluntary sector horticulture-based community interest company (CIC). Design/methodology/approach: Natureways produced positive employment outcomes and an AI process – based on co-operative inquiry with trainees, staff, and managers – explored how these had been achieved. Findings: Natureways’ efficacy was based on features of the setting (its supportiveness, rural location, and workplace authenticity), on its embeddedness (within local care-planning pathways, the horticultural industry, and the local community), and on effective intersectoral working. The inquiry also generated actionable learning about creative leadership and adaptability in the changing landscape of service provision, about the benefits of the CIC's small scale and business ethos, about the links between trainees’ employability, social inclusion and recovery, about horticulture as a training medium, and about the role of AI in service development. Practical implications: The inquiry highlights how an intersectoral CIC can be an effective model for vocational rehabilitation. Social implications: Community-embeddeness is an asset for mental health-orientated CICs, facilitating social inclusion and recovery. Social and therapeutic horticulture settings are seen to be conducive to this. Originality/value: This case study suggests that AI methodology is not only well-suited to many practitioners’ skill sets, but its participatory ethos and focus on experiential knowledge makes it suitable for bringing a service user voice to bear on service development.

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LAUGH research project

LAUGH research project New practice example about a research project to develop highly personalised, playful objects for people with advanced dementia
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