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Results for 'good practice'

Results 1 - 10 of 19

VCSE sector engagement and social prescribing

VEASEY Phil, NEFF Jennifer, MONK-OZGUL Leeann
2018

This report, commissioned by the Greater London Authority, looks at the role of the voluntary, community and social enterprise (VCSE) sector in delivering social prescribing in London and the challenges and opportunities the sector faces. It draws on case studies to highlight good and effective practice and successful partnerships models. It also outlines the resources required in terms of leadership, staff training, fundraising, technological, capacity building and other support to build an effective business case for voluntary and community-sector organisations to engage with social prescribing. The final sections suggest ways to engage voluntary sector organisations in the development and delivery of a social prescribing strategy in London and identifies specific roles for the Mayor and GLA for taking forward social prescribing. The report draws consultation with 100 experts across the VCSE sector, commissioners from the statutory-sector commissioners and representatives of the health and social care sectors.

Staying on my feet. Falls prevention: best practice guide for care homes in Wales

MY HOME LIFE CYMRU
2018

This best practice guide, which has been funded by the Welsh Government, explores what works well in supporting care home residents to remain mobile and to reduce their risk of falling. It draws on the experiences of care home staff attending events in Wales to share their expertise and stories of good practice. The guide includes examples on how care home practitioners can support residents to navigate safely around the home; how they can help residents feel motivated to get out of their chair and engage in physical activity, and how they can encourage residents to drink or eat properly. It also shows how staff have to consider how they help get the balance between reducing the risks of falling with the rights of these individuals to make choices. The guide highlights a number of creative individual strategies. It also includes a Care Home Falls Prevention Wheel which identifies 8 key areas that together can support best practice.

Preventative support for adult carers in Wales: rapid review

SOCIAL CARE INSTITUTE FOR EXCELLENCE
2018

This rapid review, commissioned by Social Care Wales, draws on research published since 2012 to identify emerging and promising practice in adult carers support. It focuses on support that takes a preventative approach by providing information and support to reduce or prevent the likelihood of carer crisis and breakdown, and improve the overall quality of carers’ lives. The review identifies key characteristics of effective preventative support services. It presents the review findings across the following key themes: identification and recognition of carers; the provision of information, advice and assistance; and supporting carers for a life outside of their caring role, through services such as respite and short breaks, emotional and employment support. Examples of services and interventions from Wales and England are included throughout. The final section looks at the available evidence on evaluating what works for carers.

Housing our ageing population: learning from councils meeting the housing needs of ageing population

LOCAL GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION
2017

The suitability of the housing stock is of critical importance to the health of individuals and also impacts on public spending, particularly social care and the NHS. This report sets out what is required to meet the housing needs and aspirations of an ageing population, outlines the current policy context and presents detailed case studies of good practice to show how councils are innovating to support older people to live in their homes for longer and promote positive ageing. They include examples of integrated approaches to health, housing and care to support older people at home; care and repair schemes to provide support for older people in mainstream housing, long term housing planning; and developing appropriate new housing for older people. The case studies are from Birmingham City Council, Central Bedfordshire Council, Essex County Council, Mansfield District Council, Newcastle City Council, North Somerset, Bristol, Bath and North-East Somerset Councils, and Worcestershire County Council. The report highlights key lessons from the case studies: having a clear vision, promoting awareness and changing attitudes; housing planning, which meets local need and involves older people; delivering and enabling new housing for older people across the public and private sector; developing integrated approaches to housing, health and care; and sustaining older people in mainstream housing. It also outlines recommendations for Government, policy makers, councils, and providers.

Good practice in social prescribing for mental health: the role of nature-based interventions

BRAGG R., LECK C.
2017

Building on early findings from Natural England, this research the value of nature-based or green care interventions within social prescribing services for people with mental health problems and highlights good practice in social prescribing services for commissioners. It draws on the results of an evidence review and an event for health and social care professionals involved with social prescribing in Leeds. The report looks at definitions of green care, models of social prescribing, examples of good practice, suggestions for scaling up nature-based interventions with social prescribing, and evidence of effectiveness and cost effectiveness. The review identified a number of different social prescribing models currently operating in England. The case studies included in the report suggest that good practice in social prescribing depends on good partnerships, high levels of cooperation and joint ownership between a wide range of individuals, groups and organisations with very different organisational cultures. Barriers to the sustainability and scaling up of social prescribing included the lack of a consistent referral mechanism and lack of direct funding for the social prescription element delivered by third sector providers. The report identifies key areas for future action

Public health working with the voluntary, community and social enterprise sector: new opportunities and sustainable change

LOCAL GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION, VOLUNTEERING MATTERS
2017

A collection of case study examples which show how public health and the voluntary, community and social enterprise sector (VCSE) are working together to improve people's health and wellbeing. The case studies cover the themes of: positive partnership and engagement between public health and the VCSE sector; commissioning and new delivery models; supporting a financially sustainable future; integrating services; and community-centred approaches. Case studies include an initiative to tackle social isolation and loneliness in older people; an integrated lifestyle and wellness support services for people at the greatest risk of poor health outcomes; and lonely, and socially isolated a marginalised people. Each case study includes an overview of the service, evaluation findings where available and key learning from the initiative. Suggestions for good practice in partnership working between public health and the VCSE sector are also included.

Making progress on personal and joined up support: report of a roundtable discussion. Implementing the NICE guideline on older people with social care needs and multiple long-term conditions (NG22)

NATIONAL INSTITUTE FOR HEALTH AND CARE EXCELLENCE
2016

This report summarises discussions from a roundtable event attended by older people and carer representatives, practitioners, providers and commissioners to identify how the NICE guideline on supporting older people with multiple long-term conditions and their carers could best be used and implemented. It also sets out practical examples, actions and ideas to help improve local practice. Small groups discussed how the guideline can help achieve three priorities that the Guideline Committee identified as most important for potential impact and the likely significant challenges. These were: empowering older people and carers; empowering health and social care practitioners; and integration of different care and support options to enable person-centred care. Suggested actions and practice examples in each of the three priority areas.

Public health's role in local government and NHS integration

LOCAL GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION
2016

Drawing on information from six case studies, this report makes the case for greater engagement of public health in supporting integration across local government and the NHS. It identifies two reasons for public health to be involved in integration: the skills, capacity and expertise public health teams can bring, and the potential of integration for improving health and wellbeing. The report explores four areas in which public health involvement in integration has been found to make the greatest impact: collaborative systems leadership, a population approach, a focus on prevention and developing outcomes. A short self-assessment tool is also included which can be used for areas to consider the extent of public health involvement in integration in their own area. The case studies come from Doncaster, Hertfordshire, London Borough of Richmond, Somerset, Wakefield and Worcestershire.

Stepping up to the place: the key to successful health and care integration

NHS CONFEDERATION, et al
2016

Joint publication from the Association of Directors of Adult Social Services, Local Government Association, NHS Clinical Commissioners and NHS Confederation which describes what a fully integrated, transformed system of health and social care should look like. Sections look at what can be achieved through integration for individuals, communities, local health wellbeing systems, and Government and national bodies; what is needed to make integration happen; what has been learnt about successful integration so far; and the issues that local and national leaders need to tackle. Drawing on a selection of evidence, reports, case studies and local experience, the document highlights three key components for effective integration. These are: shared commitments – to improving local people’s health and wellbeing, providing services around the individual, and a preventative approach; shared leadership and accountability; and shared systems – such as information and technology, payment and commissioning models, and integrated workforce planning. The final sections outline questions for local and national leaders and summarise the key components for effective integration of health and social care.

Results 1 - 10 of 19

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