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Results for 'government policy'

Results 1 - 5 of 5

A connected society. A strategy for tackling loneliness: laying the foundations for change

GREAT BRITAIN. Her Majesty's Government
2018

This strategy builds on the work of the Jo Cox Commission on Loneliness and sets out the government's approach to tackling loneliness in England. The strategy highlights the role that everyone can play in tackling loneliness, including government, communities and the individual. The government's work on loneliness is guided by three overarching goals: building the evidence base, embedding loneliness as a consideration across government policy, and building a national conversation on loneliness, to raise awareness of its impacts and to help tackle stigma. Chapter one provides a summary of the existing evidence base on loneliness, including its impacts and causes. The following three chapters set out government commitments and partnerships in three areas seen as crucial to build a connected society. These are: organisations and services - how government, working with local authorities, health bodies, businesses and the voluntary sector will introduce a range of new initiatives that enable the everyday services we use to connect those at risk of loneliness to support; community infrastructure – such as accessing community space, transport and well designed housing; and building a culture that encourages strong social relationships – including tackling stigma surrounding loneliness and supporting community groups. Chapter five sets out how government will take this agenda forward and sets out a commitment from the Loneliness Action Group to continue its work until at least the end of 2019. The document highlights examples from practice throughout.

The Government's response to the Five Year Forward View for Mental Health

GREAT BRITAIN. Her Majesty's Government
2017

This report sets out the Government’s response to the Five Year Forward View for Mental Health report by the Mental Health Taskforce. While accepting the taskforce report’s recommendations in full, this document sets out a far-reaching programme of work to improve mental health services and their links to other public services, and builds mental health prevention and response into the work of Government departments to improve the nation’s mental health and reduce the impacts of mental illness. Key areas covered include: local offer to children and young people; multi-agency suicide prevention plans; tackling alcoholism and drug addiction; access to psychological therapies; improving mental health and employment outcomes; specialist housing support for vulnerable people with mental health problems; behaviour change interventions; developing a complete health and justice pathway to deliver integrated health and justice interventions in the least restrictive setting; developing a 10-year strategy for mental health research; ensuring future updates to the Better Care Fund include mental health and social work services; ensuring GPs receive core mental health training and that the social care workforce is ready to provide high quality social work services in mental health; and ensuring accurate data collation and data sharing.

Response to the regulations and guidance of the Care Act 2014: section 2: prevention, reducing or delaying needs

CARE AND SUPPORT ALLIANCE
2015

Sets out the response of the Care and Support Alliance to the Government consultation on draft regulations and guidance of the Care Act 2014. The response focuses on section 2 which covers prevention, reducing or delaying needs. Overall, the Alliance is pleased with the draft of both the regulations and guidance, but notes areas that could be strengthened and identifies scope to improve the read across to other chapters. Areas covered in the response include the description of prevention used and the examples of preventative services and resources listed in the guidance.

Assistive technology as a means of supporting people with dementia: a review

BONNER Steve, IDRIS Tahir
2012

Awareness of Assistive Technology (AT) products, devices and solutions available is still sketchy and variable around the UK. There is almost a ‘postcode lottery’ relating to the quality of AT solutions available to people with dementia due to the varying approaches taken around the country. This paper reviews the current policy and practice in relation to AT supporting people to live well with dementia, including different housing settings and rounding off with some good practice case studies which highlight the wide array of technology solutions available. Included in this review are: a brief summary of different types of AT; a review of policy initiatives, including legislation, which have attempted to encourage the greater use of AT; ethical considerations; current practice by major housing providers; good practice examples; and people with dementia’s experience.

Ending the other care crisis: making the case for investment in preventative care and support for disabled adults

AIDEN Hardeep, BUSH Marc
2013

A third of all people using care services are disabled adults of working age. This pamphlet builds on the analysis in 'The other care crisis', which provided evidence that exposed the £1.2 billion gap in social care spending for disabled adults. Based on new research undertaken by Deloitte, this pamphlet quantifies the long-term savings to individuals and the Government of closing this gap in social care expenditure. It recommends that the Government's Spending Review should commit to establishing a national minimum threshold for eligibility that encourages councils to provide social care to people with ‘moderate’ or equivalent level needs The Government should encourage councils and the NHS to jointly invest in preventative care and support through Health and Wellbeing Boards. The Care Bill should contain a duty on Health and Wellbeing Boards to identify, plan for and commission preventative services that maximise the independence of disabled people. This should be a statutory part of their Joint Strategic Needs Assessments and Health and Wellbeing strategies. The pamphlet has been jointly produced by the National Autistic Society, Mencap, the Lenard Cheshire Disability, Sense, and Scope.

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