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Results for 'groupwork'

Results 1 - 4 of 4

A systematic review to investigate dramatherapy group work with working age adults who have a mental health problem

BOURNE Jane, ANDERSEN-WARREN Madeline, HACKETT Simon
2018

This study investigated the effects of dramatherapy group work with adults between the ages of 18 and 65 years, who have mental health problems. A systematic review was undertaken using a meta-ethnography to synthesise the existing relevant research. Database searches identified 111 records, from which 12 were included in the review. There was a combined total of n = 194 participants from eleven of the studies; plus one study that did not give exact participant numbers. The included studies were either qualitative or mixed method, with a variety of designs: case studies, interviews, focus groups, observations, questionnaires, evaluations, and use of a variety of measurement tools. There was a range of populations, including: adults with intellectual disabilities, adult offenders, community service users, and in-patients. Participants were from a number of different settings. Overall findings were encouraging and included; improvements in social interaction, improved self- awareness, empowerment and social interaction. No negative effects were reported.

A mixed methods case study exploring the impact of membership of a multi-activity, multicentre community group on social wellbeing of older adults

LINDSAY-SMITH Gabrielle, et al
2018

Background: Social wellbeing factors such as loneliness and social support have a major impact on the health of older adults and can contribute to physical and mental wellbeing. However, with increasing age, social contacts and social support typically decrease and levels of loneliness increase. Group social engagement appears to have additional benefits for the health of older adults compared to socialising individually with friends and family, but further research is required to confirm whether group activities can be beneficial for the social wellbeing of older adults. Methods: This one-year longitudinal mixed methods study investigated the effect of joining a community group, offering a range of social and physical activities, on social wellbeing of adults with a mean age of 70. The study combined a quantitative survey assessing loneliness and social support (n = 28; three time-points, analysed using linear mixed models) and a qualitative focus group study (n = 11, analysed using thematic analysis) of members from Life Activities Clubs Victoria, Australia. Results: There was a significant reduction in loneliness (p = 0.023) and a trend toward an increase in social support (p = 0.056) in the first year after joining. The focus group confirmed these observations and suggested that social support may take longer than 1 year to develop. Focus groups also identified that group membership provided important opportunities for developing new and diverse social connections through shared interest and experience. These connections were key in improving the social wellbeing of members, especially in their sense of feeling supported or connected and less lonely. Participants agreed that increasing connections was especially beneficial following significant life events such as retirement, moving to a new house or partners becoming unwell. Conclusions: Becoming a member of a community group offering social and physical activities may improve social wellbeing in older adults, especially following significant life events such as retirement or moving-house, where social network changes. These results indicate that ageing policy and strategies would benefit from encouraging long-term participation in social groups to assist in adapting to changes that occur in later life and optimise healthy ageing.

Developing peer support in the community: a toolkit

SIDE BY SIDE RESEARCH CONSORTIUM
2017

A toolkit to help people to plan and run mental health peer support in the community. The toolkit will be especially useful for those wanting to set up new projects or those involved in commissioning peer support. It outlines the three main approaches to community-based peer support and lists a core set of values underpinning peer support, and make it different from other forms of mental health support. It also looks at how peer support might be organised and provides guidance on how to better understand and communicate the impact of groups. Sections of the toolkit include reflection questions and activities which were developed alongside more than 10 groups and projects. Links to useful resources are included. The toolkit is based upon research undertaken by the Side by Side evaluation partners, which included St George’s, University of London, the McPin Foundation, and the London School of Economics.

Pulling together

WORF Candy, GOODMAN Jolie, PLIMPTON Ben
2018

This practice handbook draws on the work of the Mental Health Foundation's Standing Together project, which facilitated 19 peer-support groups for older people living in extra care housing. The aim of the groups was to improve the emotional and social wellbeing of participants, and reduce loneliness and social isolation. The handbook pulls together learning from the project and provides inspiration to anyone wanting to set up a peer-support group with older people – whether they are tenants in housing schemes, staff or volunteers. It includes information on group activities used by the facilitators, including digital photography activities, memory boxes, collages and art sessions, and flower arranging workshops. It also provides advice on managing conflict between group members, information on how to support a community when a member dies, information for facilitators, and highlights the importance of listening to group members.

Results 1 - 4 of 4

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News

Moving Memory

Moving Memory Practice example about how the Moving Memory Dance Theatre Company is challenging perceived notions of age and ageing.

Chatty Cafe Scheme

Chatty Cafe Scheme Practice example about how the Chatty Cafe Scheme is helping to tackle loneliness by bringing people of all ages together

Oomph! Wellness

Oomph! Wellness Practice example about how Oomph! Wellness is supporting staff to get older adults active and combat growing levels of social isolation

KOMP

KOMP Practice example about how KOMP, designed by No Isolation is helping older people stay connected with their families

LAUGH research project

LAUGH research project Practice example about a research project to develop highly personalised, playful objects for people with advanced dementia
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