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Results for 'health care'

Results 21 - 30 of 30

The NHS in 2030: a vision of a people-powered, knowledge-powered health system

BLAND Jessica
2015

This report explores four big ways that knowledge power and people power will affect the NHS in 2030 and the wider health system, through precision medicine, new forms of health data, people–powered health, and the use of behavioural insights. Section 1, in particular, concentrates on where new kinds of medical information about individuals will come from, as well as how it is interpreted in stratified care. Section 2 moves onto people managing their own health information and new digital platforms for supporting patient–led research and care. Section 3 looks at the possibility of a social movement for health: people being trusted to have a more active role in their own health and to look after others, supported by the NHS, as well as people supporting health services. Section 4 explores how insights into human behaviours can help redesign health services, products and treatments in a way that reflects better how people live their lives and make choices. This is followed by a summary of how these developments will change the function of the NHS. The final sections focus on the challenges involved in getting to the best version of this future and ideas for how these changes can be supported today. Concentrating on the widest gaps between these ideas and current policy, the conclusion includes four proposals that would support new functions in the health system. These are: developing digital platforms and widely agreed protocols for developing new kinds of health knowledge; creating prototypes for health data sharing that concentrate on understanding emerging attitudes to digital privacy; establishing an institution that supports and evaluates people powered health research; and creating a central institution to set standards and mandate processes that will maximise the clinical and research value of large genomic and other data sets as they become available.

Powerful people: reinforcing the power of citizens and communities in health and care: report

MUIR Rick, QUILTER-PINNER Harry
2015

This report argues that giving citizens greater control over their health and care can both promote the redesign of services, so that they are developed around citizens needs and aspirations, and also save money by supporting people to manage their conditions themselves. The report begins by looking at what empowerment in health and care means and the benefits it can bring in terms of autonomy, better health outcomes, patient satisfaction, and reductions in cost. It then describes previous programmes and initiatives which aimed to give citizens and communities greater power and why these approaches have not been entirely successful. It then describes five models of care which actively empower citizens and communities and address the deficiencies of previous initiatives. The models described are: social prescribing; brokerage and integration; peer support; asset-based community development; and technology-enabled care plans, which provide people with the tools to better manage their condition themselves. The final chapter identifies five enablers of systems change to help encourage the development and wider adoption of these new models of care: finance, devolving power and integration, recruitment and training workforce, the adoption new technology, empowering citizens to have greater control of their health and care.

Fit for frailty: consensus best practice guidance for the care of older people living with frailty in community and outpatient settings

TURNER Gillian
2014

The first of a two-part guidance on the recognition and management of older patients with frailty in community and outpatient settings. This guide has been produced in association with the Royal College of General Practitioners (RCGP) and Age UK and aims to be an invaluable tool for social workers, ambulance crews, carers, GPs, nurses and others working with older people in the community. The guidance will help them to recognise the condition of frailty and to increase understanding of the strategies available for managing it. In the guidelines, the British Geriatrics Society (BGS) calls for all those working with older people to be aware of, and assess for frailty. It dispels the myth that all older people are frail and that frailty is an inevitable part of age. It also highlights the fact that frailty is not static. Like other long term conditions it can fluctuate in severity.

A guide to community-centred approaches for health and wellbeing: full report

SOUTH Jane
2015

Outlines a 'family' of approaches for evidence-based community-centred approaches to health and wellbeing. The report presents the work undertaken in phase 1 of the 'Working with communities: empowerment evidence and learning' project, which was initiated jointly by PHE and NHS England to draw together and disseminate research and learning on community-centred approaches for health and wellbeing. The report provides a guide to the case for change, the concepts, the varieties of approach that have been tried and tested and sources of evidence. The new family of community-centred approaches outlined in this document represents some of the available options that can be used to improve health and wellbeing, grouped around four different strands: strengthening communities - where approaches involve building on community capacities to take action together on health and the social determinants of health; volunteer and peer roles - where approaches focus on enhancing individuals' capabilities to provide advice, information and support or organise activities around health and wellbeing in their or other communities; collaborations and partnerships - where approaches involve communities and local services working together at any stage of planning cycle, from identifying needs through to implementation and evaluation; and access to community resources - where approaches connect people to community resources, practical help, group activities and volunteering opportunities to meet health needs and increase social participation.

Inclusive integration: how whole person care can work for adults with disabilities

BROADBRIDGE Angela
2014

This report focusses on meeting the needs of working-age disabled adults as health and social care services are increasing integrated. It provides an empirical evidence base to demonstrate how whole person care (which is about making the connections between physical health, mental health and social care services) can be used to effectively meet these needs. The report also draws on the findings of a focus group with 12 disabled adults and carers on desired outcomes from the integration of health and social care services. Interviews with social care and voluntary sector professionals, commissioners and local authority policy to see if they are willing to include working-age disabled adults' needs in plans for future integration. The report looks at how working-age disabled adults have different needs and outcomes from older people and identifies the health inequalities they face in day-to-day life. Ten dimensions of health inequality are identified including housing, employment, financial security and quality of life. The report makes seven recommendations to inform the service response, including: taking a long term view of managing long-term conditions, viewing whole person care as a 10-year journey with matched by stable funding; debates on funding gap in social care should give consideration to the needs of working-age disabled adults; shifting resources from case management to community coordinated care to support prevention and providing a single point of contact for health and social care needs; service integration should take place across a much wider range of services to meet the needs of disabled people.

For future living: innovative approaches to joining up housing and health

DAVIES Bill
2014

Examines older people’s expectations from their housing and housing providers and the choices the UK housing market currently offers older and vulnerable people, and explores innovative housing and care solutions that could meet the demands of an ageing population and more widely support people with other social needs. The study drew on both quantitative surveys and qualitative interviews undertaken in previous research to establish what older groups need and expect from the housing market, and then used statistical methods to create a clear picture of the housing that older people inhabit now and the choices that the English housing market offers to them. Having established that the market presents only a limited range of options to older people, the research explored the international literature to identify different models of housing and support, focusing on countries that face similar demographic challenges. The report considers ideas that could potentially be adopted in England and adapted to an English housing and health context. A number of options were tested with two focus groups, involving over-55s and over-65s. Finally, based on the information drawn from the research, and through consultation with external experts, this report outlines a range of possible policy measures designed to ensure that the current and future stock of housing for older people is more effectively focused on supporting their health requirements.

Making a case for information: full report

TREADGOLD Paul, GRANT Carol
2013

This research report highlights how providing information to patients and their carers improves outcomes, reduces costs and gives people a better experience of care. Consumer health information (CHI) is defined as information and support provided to help patients and carers understand, manage and/or make decisions about their health, condition or treatment. High quality means effective information, which meets the needs of users and empowers them to make choices and take control of their health and wellbeing. The Patient Information Forum (PiF) commissioned research to identify the benefits of investing in health information. The project, which looked at over 300 studies, found that there are good business reasons to justify the investment of more time, money and training in health information provision and support. These include positive impacts on service use and costs, substantial capacity savings, and significant returns on investment by increasing shared decision-making, self-care and the self-management of long-term conditions.

Predictive validity of tools used to assess the risk of unplanned admissions: a rapid review of the evidence

PATON Fiona, WILSON Paul, WRIGHT Kath
2014

A synthesis of evidence assessing the predictive ability of tools used to identify frail elderly and people living with multiple long-term chronic health conditions who are at risk of future unplanned hospital admissions. There are now a large number of models available that can be used to predict the risk of unplanned hospital admissions and this study aims to provide a summary of their comparative performance. Overall, the models identified in this review show reasonable concordance in terms of their predictive performance (based on c-statistics). Models reporting other performance indications showed that at different thresholds, as sensitivity increased, specificity would decrease. As the algorithms become more complex or incorporate longer term horizons specificity increased but the ability of the models to identify future high cost individuals reduced. It should also be noted that whilst the reported c-statistics are broadly similar, the underlying populations, data sources and coding may differ.

Impact and economic assessment of assistive technology in care homes in Norfolk, UK

AL-ORAIBI Saleh, FORDHAM Ric, LAMBERT Rod
2012

This study looked at whether new assistive technology (AT) systems in care homes for elderly residents, reduced the number of falls and demands for formal health services. The project collected retrospective data about the incidence of falls before and after AT systems were installed in two care homes in Norfolk, UK. These homes were selected purposefully because a recent assessment identified the need for upgrading their call system. They had different resident profiles regarding the prevalence of dementia. Standard incident report forms were examined for a period starting ten months before the upgrades to ten months after in Care Home 1 and from six months before to six months afterwards in Care Home 2. Overall there were 314 falls reported during the course of the study; the number reduced from 202 to 112 after the introduction of AT. The mean health care costs associated with falls in Care Home 1 were significantly reduced (more than 50%). In Care Home 2 there was no significant difference in the mean cost. The results suggest that installing an AT system in residential care homes can reduce the number of falls and health care cost in homes with a lower proportion of residents with advanced dementia compared to those with more residents with advanced dementia.

The economic impact of care in the home services: a report commissioned by the British Red Cross

DELOITTE
2012

This study estimates the economic benefits to commissioners of both health and social care across six British Red Cross schemes, two covering A&E hospital schemes, and four focused on community and individual resilience. Based on analysing these six schemes, BRC is found to be delivering substantial savings to health and social care commissioners, ranging from £168 to £704 per user relating to a rate of return between 40 to 280 per cent. Savings are realised through the prevention of hospital admission or reduced length of stay in hospital; reduced levels of hospital readmission; and preventing or minimising the use of expensive domiciliary and residential care. All the BRC schemes across the UK are estimated to have the potential to save commissioners £8m. This saving implies an overall return of 149 per cent on commissioner expenditure, suggesting that these schemes deliver material benefits and form a crucial element of care in the UK. In addition to savings there are a number of further benefits the schemes deliver, including service user benefits, signposting and assistance with access to additional services, reduction of social isolation and greater independence and wellbeing through the use of volunteers.

Results 21 - 30 of 30

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