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Results for 'health education'

Results 1 - 8 of 8

Never too late: prevention in an ageing world

INTERNATIONAL LONGEVITY CENTRE UK
2020

This report explores how health care systems can better prevent ill health across people's lives, focusing on people interventions among those aged 50 and over. It presents analysis focussing on a small number of diseases where preventative interventions by healthcare systems could make a real difference to people’s health and wellbeing. These are cardiovascular, lung cancer, type 2 diabetes and HIV. It also considers the case of flu. It presents a snapshot of the potential burden and cost of these diseases, such as costs due to sick days, presenteeism and early retirement. It also provides brief overviews of preventative interventions, which have the potential to help people live healthier for longer. The analysis presented in the report shows that failure to invest in prevention will bring substantial social, health and economic costs. It argues that in order to follow through on commitments to prevention, governments need to improve access to preventative interventions to tackle growing health inequalities; encourage populations, professionals and policymakers to promote good health and prevent illness; and effectively utilise technology to deliver preventative interventions.

Interventions for preventing falls in older people living in the community (review)

GILLESPIE Lesley D., et al
2012

Background: Approximately 30 per cent of people over 65 years of age living in the community fall each year. This is an update of a Cochrane review first published in 2009.Objective: To assess the effects of interventions designed to reduce the incidence of falls in older people living in the community. Search methods: this review searched the Cochrane Bone, Joint and Muscle Trauma Group Specialised Register (February 2012), CENTRAL (The Cochrane Library2012, Issue 3), MEDLINE (1946 to March 2012), EMBASE (1947 to March 2012), CINAHL (1982 to February 2012), and online trial registers. Selection criteria: Randomised trials of interventions to reduce falls in community-dwelling older people. Main results: this review included 159 trials with 79,193 participants. Most trials compared a fall prevention intervention with no intervention or an intervention not expected to reduce falls. The most common interventions tested were exercise as a single intervention (59 trials) and multifactorial programmes (40 trials). Findings: Group and home‐based exercise programmes, usually containing some balance and strength training exercises, effectively reduced falls, as did Tai Chi. Overall, exercise programmes aimed at reducing falls appear to reduce fractures. Multifactorial interventions assess an individual's risk of falling, and then carry out treatment or arrange referrals to reduce the identified risks. Overall, current evidence shows that this type of intervention reduces the number of falls in older people living in the community but not the number of people falling during follow‐up. These are complex interventions, and their effectiveness may be dependent on factors yet to be determined. Interventions to improve home safety appear to be effective, especially in people at higher risk of falling and when carried out by occupational therapists. An anti‐slip shoe device worn in icy conditions can also reduce falls. Taking vitamin D supplements does not appear to reduce falls in most community‐dwelling older people, but may do so in those who have lower vitamin D levels in the blood before treatment. Some medications increase the risk of falling. Three trials in this review failed to reduce the number of falls by reviewing and adjusting medications. A fourth trial involving family physicians and their patients in medication review was effective in reducing falls. Gradual withdrawal of a particular type of drug for improving sleep, reducing anxiety, and treating depression (psychotropic medication) has been shown to reduce falls. Cataract surgery reduces falls in women having the operation on the first affected eye. Insertion of a pacemaker can reduce falls in people with frequent falls associated with carotid sinus hypersensitivity, a condition which causes sudden changes in heart rate and blood pressure. In people with disabling foot pain, the addition of footwear assessment, customised insoles, and foot and ankle exercises to regular podiatry reduced the number of falls but not the number of people falling. The evidence relating to the provision of educational materials alone for preventing falls is inconclusive.

Fall prevention for people with learning disabilities: key points and recommendations for practitioners and researchers

FINLAYSON Janet
2018

Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to provide a narrative review of what is currently known about the high rates of falls, and fall injuries, which are experienced by people with learning disabilities (LDs) throughout their lives. Design/methodology/approach: Narrative review. Current evidence is summarised as key points and recommendations for practitioners and researchers. Findings: People with LDs experience similar rates of falls as older adults in the wider population, but throughout their lives, or at an earlier age. Originality/value: Key points and recommendations are summarised for practitioners and researchers to promote fall prevention strategies and interventions for people with LDs.

Altogether Better working together to create healthier people and communities: bringing citizens and services together in new conversations

ALTOGETHER BETTER
2015

An evaluation report of the Altogether Better Wellbeing 2 Programme, working with citizens and services keen to find new ways to improve the health and well-being of their local community. Through the two year programme, funded by the Big Lottery Fund, people were invited to become health champions, they were then nurtured as a group and encouraged to take action to improve local health and well-being in ways that their local NHS or statutory services wanted to support. The report finds that champions, and participants in the groups and activities that they have run, have benefited significantly from their involvement in a wide range of activities; with over 98 per cent reporting increased involvement in social activities and social groups and over 86 per cent reporting increased levels of confidence, well-being and new knowledge related to health and well-being. The NHS and statutory organisations have come to a greater recognition of the resourcefulness and generosity of the citizens who use their services. They are beginning to recognise that it is legitimate and effective for them to divert more of their time and resources into supporting volunteers who themselves support the health and well-being of their communities. This in turn raises the possibility of these organisations radically changing the way they provide services. The report concludes by arguing that the success of the approach depends critically on the quality of the working relationship between health champions and their organisation and that there are grounds for optimism, as a result of these relationships, that support for health champions will be sustainable into the long term, becoming simply ‘how we do things round here’.

Building community capacity: the economic case in adult social care in England

PERSONAL SOCIAL SERVICES RESEARCH UNIT
2015

This briefing summarises the findings of a study to establish the costs, outputs and outcomes of a number of four best practice community capacity-building projects, especially in relation to their potential for alleviating pressures on adult social care budgets and in the context of current policy interests. All projects worked under financial uncertainties and these challenges highlighted a poor fit between third sector infrastructures and the public sector’s growing requirements for targeted, evidence-based investments. The four projects evaluated comprised support services for people with disabilities, a help-at-home scheme for older people, a training scheme to produce local health champions and a peer-support project for people with mental health issues. Such third sector approaches may postpone or replace formal social care, but projects found it difficult to meet demands for data, whether for making a business case or for the purposes of research. The study found that well-targeted schemes have the potential to produce both benefits to participants and substantial savings to public agencies. Yet the current commissioning context tends to encourage organisations to focus on established priorities rather than to develop innovative, community-based services.

Beyond fighting fires: the role of the fire and rescue service in improving the public's health

LOCAL GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION
2015

The case studies contained within this publication explore the activities of fire and rescue service to help the most vulnerable individuals and families in their communities. The trust placed in these services and the comprehensive access to the public that this provides means they have a unique ability to provide critical interventions, promote health messages and refer to appropriate services. These case studies include programmes spread across England, covering both rural and urban environments and with varying levels of deprivation and affluence. They show a range of ways in which the fire and rescue service supports prevention and contributes to tackling health inequalities by: supporting people with dementia; using firefighters to be ‘health champions’; tackling child obesity; reaching out to the most vulnerable; looking out for babies and toddlers; getting people active; working with others to save lives; and reducing falls in the home.

Supporting self-management: summarising evidence from systematic reviews

NATIONAL VOICES
2014

This booklet sets out research findings of the benefits of supporting people to self-manage. It also sets out the evidence for the impact of self-management education for patients, proactive telephone and psychosocial support, home-based self-monitoring and simplified dosing strategies and information. Self-management includes all the actions taken by people to recognise, treat and manage their own healthcare independently of or in partnership with the healthcare system. People feel more confident and engaged when they are encouraged to self-manage by professionals, therefore supporting self-management is key to prioritising person-centred care. Drawing on the findings from 228 systematic reviews, the paper concludes that the top three things that might most usefully be invested in are disease specific, generic and on-line self-management courses, proactive telephone support and self monitoring of symptoms and vital signs.

Local leadership, new approaches: how new ways of working are helping to improve the health of local communities

PUBLIC HEALTH ENGLAND
2015

Examines how local authorities and health teams are working together to improve the health of local communities through prevention and early intervention. The report features seven case studies. Each one describes a particular programme or close partnership between a local authority and local public health or health care teams, often with the additional support of the voluntary sector. Each initiative focuses on a specific area and/or set of activities, including: integrating wellbeing; transforming the food culture in schools; helping people stay in their own homes; GPs linking people to other sources of support; healthy homes and housing conditions; promoting public health in schools; and active living.

Results 1 - 8 of 8

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News

Moving Memory

Moving Memory Practice example about how the Moving Memory Dance Theatre Company is challenging perceived notions of age and ageing.

Chatty Cafe Scheme

Chatty Cafe Scheme Practice example about how the Chatty Cafe Scheme is helping to tackle loneliness by bringing people of all ages together

Oomph! Wellness

Oomph! Wellness Practice example about how Oomph! Wellness is supporting staff to get older adults active and combat growing levels of social isolation

KOMP

KOMP Practice example about how KOMP, designed by No Isolation is helping older people stay connected with their families

LAUGH research project

LAUGH research project Practice example about a research project to develop highly personalised, playful objects for people with advanced dementia
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