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Results for 'home adaptations'

Results 11 - 12 of 12

For future living: innovative approaches to joining up housing and health

DAVIES Bill
2014

Examines older people’s expectations from their housing and housing providers and the choices the UK housing market currently offers older and vulnerable people, and explores innovative housing and care solutions that could meet the demands of an ageing population and more widely support people with other social needs. The study drew on both quantitative surveys and qualitative interviews undertaken in previous research to establish what older groups need and expect from the housing market, and then used statistical methods to create a clear picture of the housing that older people inhabit now and the choices that the English housing market offers to them. Having established that the market presents only a limited range of options to older people, the research explored the international literature to identify different models of housing and support, focusing on countries that face similar demographic challenges. The report considers ideas that could potentially be adopted in England and adapted to an English housing and health context. A number of options were tested with two focus groups, involving over-55s and over-65s. Finally, based on the information drawn from the research, and through consultation with external experts, this report outlines a range of possible policy measures designed to ensure that the current and future stock of housing for older people is more effectively focused on supporting their health requirements.

Building a business case for investing in adaptive technologies in England

SNELL Tom, FERNANDEZ Jose-Luis, FORDER Julien
2012

For many dependent adults, the provision of adaptive technologies provides a means to independent living and a decrease in the reliance on support from family members or more costly social care services. At present, the two main sources of state funding for equipment and adaptations are through Community Equipment Services (for minor adaptations up to a value of £1,000, such as grab rails) and through Disabled Facilities Grants (DFGs) (for major adaptations up to a value of £30,000, such as stairllifts or bathroom modifications). While costs of provision vary greatly by type of intervention, the majority of the research literature focuses on adaptations with an average value of approximately £6,000. The research described in this report provides an evaluation of the outcomes associated with the provision of adaptive technologies at an economic level, and, by extension. the likely impact of increases or reductions in investment in the context of increasing constraints on social care budgets. The analysis followed a three-stage process. The first stage was a systematic review of the literature in which the available evidence on the costs, effectiveness and outcomes associated with adaptive technologies was systematically collected and analysed. In the second stage, an analysis incorporating the findings gathered in the literature review was used to build a quantitative simulation model of the outcomes associated with aids and adaptations. At the final stage, the output of the literature review and model were used to inform a discussion around the policy implications. The research in this report was supported by a grant from Stannah and the British Healthcare Trades Association.

Results 11 - 12 of 12

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