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Results for 'housing'

Results 1 - 10 of 38

Integration in action: housing services to enable people to stay living independently at home. Homewise Memory Matters: supporting people with memory loss, dementia and their carers at home in East Lancashire

CARE AND REPAIR ENGLAND
2017

This briefing describes the Homewise Memory Matters project for people with memory loss, dementia and their carers. The project supports people with memory loss and dementia to stay at home continuing to live independently keeping them safe and out of hospital and residential care. It also works with their carers to ensure that they are aware of local services including respite care and have a network of support available to them. Project outcomes include: prevention of hospital admission e.g. reduced falls risk; reduced risk of admission to residential care; extended independent living at home; improved wellbeing including support for carers; improved safety and security at home; and reduction in social isolation.

A connected recovery: findings of the APPG on loneliness inquiry

ALL-PARTY PARLIAMENTARY GROUP ON LONELINESS
2021

Findings of an inquiry into loneliness, which explored problems and identified solutions within four crucial policy areas, including: translating national policy into local action through local authorities; community infrastructure (including housing, transport and public spaces); how to adequately fund the voluntary and community sector upon which social prescribing depends; designing and implementing ways to test the implications of government policies on loneliness. The inquiry found that there are too many barriers preventing people from connecting – such as a lack of safe, welcoming and accessible green spaces, parks and gardens, public toilets, playing areas, local bus services, and ramps for people with disabilities. Too many people face barriers to digital connection as a result of lack of access to mobile technology and the internet, as well as a lack of digital skills and confidence. Poorly designed or unsuitable housing and neighbourhoods can make it hard for people to meet each other, maintain social connections and develop a sense of belonging. Some communities and groups were highlighted as facing particular disadvantage in relation to transport and mobility. The report makes the case for a “connected recovery” from the COVID-19 pandemic, recognising the need for long-term work to rebuild social connections following periods of isolation and the importance of connection to resilience to future shocks. To achieve this, the APPG sets out a roadmap, calling on the government to adopt 15 recommendations, designed to: tackle loneliness through national leadership; translate national policy into local action; invest in the community and social infrastructure needed to connect, particularly in areas with higher levels of deprivation; loneliness proof all new transport and housing developments, and close the digital divide by increasing digital skills and confidence.

Better lives for older people: an evaluation of Octavia’s outreach, befriending and activities services

NEW PHILANTHROPY CAPITAL, OCTAVIA
2021

This is an abridged version of an evaluation of Octavia’s work to identify, document, and share learning about the impact of their outreach, one-to-one befriending, and group activity service. Octavia is a not-for-profit organisation that provides homes, support and care to older and vulnerable adults living in their homes and in the wider community. It offers three key services: outreach support – provides personal contact and practical help to isolated individuals, to combat loneliness and improve access to community and health services; one-to-one befriending – provides regular and on-going companionship, with weekly visits from trained and committed volunteer befrienders; and group activities – offers a range of group and social activities and events connecting people, promoting involvement, and fostering friendships. Key findings related to achieving Octavia’s social, emotional and health outcomes include: group activities seem to be especially useful for reducing service user feelings of loneliness and increasing their confidence (compared to one-to-one befriending or outreach support); outreach workers and one-to-one befrienders play a bigger role in supporting service users to access essential services; service users who had difficulties attending GP or hospital appointments reported the greatest improvements in their mental well-being and quality of life, self-care, confidence and physical health and independence; service users who had long-term mental health conditions reported the greatest improvements in their mental well-being and quality of life, feeling more socially connected, and improvements in their self-esteem; service users who were male reported the greatest improvements in their confidence and feeling more socially connected. Service users reported very high levels of overall satisfaction with the outreach, one-to-one befriending and activity service. The service received a 96% level of satisfaction, with equally high levels reported across all three service streams.

Better lives for older people: an evaluation of Octavia’s outreach, befriending and activities services for older people

MANNIX Matthew, PARKER Elizabeth
2021

An evaluation of Octavia’s work to identify, document, and share learning about the impact of their outreach, one-to-one befriending, and group activity service. Octavia is a not-for-profit organisation that provides homes, support and care to older and vulnerable adults living in their homes and in the wider community. It offers three key services: outreach support – provides personal contact and practical help to isolated individuals, to combat loneliness and improve access to community and health services; one-to-one befriending – provides regular and on-going companionship, with weekly visits from trained and committed volunteer befrienders; and group activities – offers a range of group and social activities and events connecting people, promoting involvement, and fostering friendships. Key findings related to achieving Octavia’s social, emotional and health outcomes include: group activities seem to be especially useful for reducing service user feelings of loneliness and increasing their confidence (compared to one-to-one befriending or outreach support); outreach workers and one-to-one befrienders play a bigger role in supporting service users to access essential services; service users who had difficulties attending GP or hospital appointments reported the greatest improvements in their mental well-being and quality of life, self-care, confidence and physical health and independence; service users who had long-term mental health conditions reported the greatest improvements in their mental well-being and quality of life, feeling more socially connected, and improvements in their self-esteem; service users who were male reported the greatest improvements in their confidence and feeling more socially connected. Service users reported very high levels of overall satisfaction with the outreach, one-to-one befriending and activity service. The service received a 96% level of satisfaction, with equally high levels reported across all three service streams.

Together in the 2020s: twenty ideas for creating a Britain for all ages by 2030

UNITED FOR ALL AGES
2020

This report presents 20 innovative ideas to bring older and younger people together and create a stronger society. The ideas cover three areas of public life: practical intergenerational projects, social and economic policies, and culture, media and sport. The report also highlights how intergenerational projects can change attitudes, improve older people’s health and care, tackle loneliness and increase trust and understanding between generations. The ideas include enabling more care homes to become community hubs; extending schools’ opening hours to provide community spaces for intergenerational activities; scaling up homesharing schemes for older and younger people; and the creation of a government department to join up and support intergenerational action. The recommendations draw on contributions from 25 national and local organisations.

Going the extra step: a compendium of best practice in dementia care. Preventing unwanted isolation and loneliness for people with dementia living in housing with care

TWYFORD Katey, WELLS Wendy
2019

A collection of examples of extra care schemes and other housing related community services that support people with dementia to develop meaningful relationships, helping to reduce social isolation and loneliness. They include examples of personalised support that can be arranged for residents; examples of groups and social activities; and different organisational and community-based approaches that have been adopted. The examples range from informal arrangements supported by staff or other residents to formal service provision.

Health at home: a new health and wellbeing model for social housing tenants

PEABODY
2018

Explores how housing support services and community-based health services can deliver effective services at lower cost; encourage self-care for the most vulnerable customers and reduce dependency on direct support; work with other agencies to ensure a coordinated response to the residents’ complex and multiple health needs. The report sets out the findings of a study which aimed to test a person-centred support model using a randomised control trial of 261 general needs residents aged over 50. The service model employed health navigators and volunteers to coach and connect residents with the relevant health, housing and community services they need. The study used to measurement tools to assess impact: the Patient Activation Measure (PAM) and Coaching for Activation (CFA). The study found that three months of intervention with those who started in PAM Level 2 was sufficient to move them up, on average, an entire PAM level. This increase in activation was sustained for at least nine months after the intervention ended, suggesting that participants gained the skills and confidence to effectively manage their health without further support after the initial intensive intervention. This is significant as one of the largest studies into cost reductions from PAM level changes in the United States found that patients who moved from Level 2 to Level 3 reduced their annual healthcare costs by 12%. Existing evidence also indicates that when people become more active in self-care, they benefit from better health outcomes, and fewer unplanned health admissions. The report concludes that there is a clear and compelling case for continuing to support integrated care and strengthen links between the health and housing agendas.

Managing Better good practice guide

CARE AND REPAIR CYMRU
2018

This guide aims to inform good practice when supporting older people to live independently at home, working with them to ensure their homes are safe, warm and accessible. It highlights partnership working between Care & Repair Cymru, RNIB Cymru and Action on Hearing Loss Cymru to develop an initiative providing support to older people with sensory loss or who are vulnerable in other ways, helping them to retain their independence and remain living in their own homes, with an emphasis on joint working across health, social care and the third sector. The guide includes a number of individual case studies and highlights good practice examples from the Managing Better service to provide a resource for all Care and Repair caseworkers

Small but significant: the impact and cost benefits of handyperson services

ADAMS Sue
2018

An evaluation of the impacts and cost benefits of handyperson services carrying out small repairs and minor adaptations in the home for older people. It looks at how handyperson service fit into the current policy landscape summarises current evidence on their impact and cost effectiveness. It then provides an in depth evaluation of the of Preston Care and Repair handyperson service, with analysis of outputs, outcomes and examines the cost benefits in relation to falls prevention. The evaluation involved data analysis of jobs completed, a survey of users of the service and interviews with staff and service users. It reports that during the 9 month evaluation period 1,399 jobs were carried out in the homes of 697 older people, which exceeded outcome targets. Of people using the service, 46 percent were over 80 years and 72 percent were older people living alone. Older people also valued the service. Ninety-six percent of those surveyed said that the Preston Care and Repair handyperson service made them less worried about their home and 100 percent said that they would recommend the service to others. Analysis of the falls prevention impact on a small number of higher risk cases, found that for every £1 spent on the handyperson service the saving to health and care was £4.28. Other health and social care related outcomes included a risk reduction for hospital admission risk reduction and faster discharge to home, improved wellbeing, safer independent living, and reduced isolation. The report illustrates the impacts of handyperson services cover health, housing and social care aims and objectives. They also offer a cost effective solution with significant cost benefits and a high rate of return on investment, both financial and social.

Home from hospital: how housing services are relieving pressures on the NHS

COPEMAN Ian, EDWARDS Margaret, PORTEUS Jeremy, HOUSING LEARNING AND IMPROVEMENT NETWORK
2017

This report shows how housing services are helping to relieve pressure on the NHS by reducing delays in discharging people from hospital and preventing unnecessary hospital admissions. It features 12 case studies to show the positive impact these services have on people’s lives and the cost benefit to the NHS. The case studies highlight services that will benefit people most at risk of delayed discharge, such as older people, people with mental health problems and people experiencing homelessness. The case studies also demonstrate a diversity of housing and health services including: 'step down' bed services for people coming out of hospital who cannot return to their own home immediately; hospital discharge support and housing adaptation services to enable timely and appropriate transfers out of hospital and back to patients' existing homes; providing a new home for people whose existing home or lack of housing mean that they have nowhere suitable to be discharged to; and Home from Hospital services to keeping people well at home who would otherwise be at risk of being admitted or readmitted to hospital. The report also considers the impact and additional savings that could be made by housing providers if this work were to be scaled up.

Results 1 - 10 of 38

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News

Prevention in social care

Prevention in social care What it means, the policy context, role for commissioners and practitioners and the evidence base.

H4All wellbeing service

H4All wellbeing service Practice example about how H4All Wellbeing Service is using the Patient Activation Measure (PAM) tool

Moving Memory

Moving Memory Practice example about how the Moving Memory Dance Theatre Company is challenging perceived notions of age and ageing.

Chatty Cafe Scheme

Chatty Cafe Scheme Practice example about how the Chatty Cafe Scheme is helping to tackle loneliness by bringing people of all ages together

Oomph! Wellness

Oomph! Wellness Practice example about how Oomph! Wellness is supporting staff to get older adults active and combat growing levels of social isolation

LAUGH research project

LAUGH research project Practice example about a research project to develop highly personalised, playful objects for people with advanced dementia

KOMP

KOMP Practice example about how KOMP, designed by No Isolation is helping older people stay connected with their families
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