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Results for 'independence'

Results 1 - 10 of 25

Agents for change: an evaluation of the Somerset Village Agents programme

COMMUNITY COUNCIL FOR SOMERSET
2017

An evaluation of the Somerset Village Agents programme, which aims to reduce isolation and help connect excluded and vulnerable people with services that support them to improve their independence, health and wellbeing. It uses locally based staff who act as first point of contact for people needing information and support. The evaluation, undertaken jointly by South West Forum and Clarity CiC with support from University of Gloucestershire, included analysis of client data, interviews with clients and discussions with locally based staff. Analysis was carried out between October 2016 and February 2017. The results of the evaluation found that the Somerset Village Agents programme is highly regarded by clients, statutory agencies and voluntary and public organisations who have a connection with the programme. It is also helping the most isolated, lonely and vulnerable people in the community, especially older people and those with disabilities and/or long-term health conditions. Areas for potential improvement identified by the evaluation included expanding reach of the programme to reach more younger people and more work to build community capacity. A cost benefit analysis of the programme estimates that for the 21-month period reviewed the Village Agents programme cost £646,000 to deliver and generated £2.5 million in direct savings to the state and a further £2.74 million in wider social value. The report makes recommendations for the future development of the programme.

Age UK Doncaster Circles project: evaluation report 17/18

CLIFFORD Carol, BOWN Helen
2018

An evaluation of the Circles for Independence in Later Life (CFILL) project in Doncaster, from the period April 2017 to July 2018. Based on the Community Circles model, the project focuses on increasing social engagement, independence and resilience of older people, particularly those at risk of hospitalisation or entry into a care home. The model has been adapted to support older people who have no family or friends or where they don’t want them to be part of the circle. The volunteers becoming part of an older person’s social network or ‘circle’ rather than facilitating others to create one. The evaluation draws on both quantitative and qualitative methods of data collection. The findings show that during the evaluation period 112 people have been involved in the initiative, 76 have had contact with a Circles Connector at Age UK Doncaster, and 40 people out of the 76 who are actively engaged have been matched with a volunteer. The evaluation shows that the project is having a positive impact for those involved towards the four project outcomes: increased confidence in managing long-term health conditions and staying independent; improvements in mental wellbeing; an increase in social connections and less isolation; and benefits for families and volunteers.

Reducing older people's need for care: exploring risk factors for loss of independence

WHYARD Julia
2019

An executive summary of a report commissioned by Nottinghamshire County Council to explore recent evidence and identify a set of risk factors to older people’s independence. It explores risk factors in three areas: Social and Psychosocial Domain; Long term or Personal Conditions Domain; and Life Events Domain. Risk factors are then further grouped into: modifiable risk factors such as depression or loneliness, where specific support or services can be offered to minimise their impact; and non-modifiable risk factors such as age or history of falls; which can help identify older people at greater risk and who may potentially benefit from some preventative services and support. The report identifies the following factors as being the most significant, primary risk factors to older people’s independence and institutionalisation: Dementia with co-morbidity; Co-morbidity; carer burden; falls; social isolation and loneliness; poor confidence and self-esteem; and poor perception of own health status. The report also highlights examples of preventative tools and interventions that could stop, delay or defer the need for long-term institutional care for older people. The findings will be used to inform Nottinghamshire County Council’s ongoing local development of an “early warning system”.

Age UK Rotherham hospital aftercare service: evaluation of the pilot extension into UECC and AMU at TRFT

DAYSON Chris, BASHIR Nadia, LEATHER David
2018

An independent evaluation of the pilot extension of the Age UK Rotherham (AUKR) Hospital Aftercare Service (HAS, into the Emergency Department and Assessment Medical Unit of The Rotherham Foundation Trust Hospital. The pilot, funded by the Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG), ran from 1st October 2017 to 30th September 2018. The evaluation looks at outcomes, focussing on the impact of the service on avoidable hospital admissions, patient experience and independence. It reports that the pilot service provided support to 239 older people who would otherwise have been admitted, offering transport to return home where safe to do so, help and support to settle back in at home and support to access other forms of community based support to enable them to continue to live independently. The findings of the evaluation were overwhelmingly positive. Outcomes achieved include: the prevention of 20 in-patient admissions resulting in the avoidance of £32,180 (estimated) in NHS costs; the provision of additional support in their home to 55 HAS patients and access additional benefits entitlements with a total value of £22,243.55; and reduced waiting times for patient prior to discharge and an improved flow through UECC. Both patients and staff were very positive about the service. The evaluation estimates that overall the pilot led to total benefits (to health services and to patients) of £65,704, a return on investment of 73 pence (£0.73) for each pound (£) invested by the CCG.

TEC stories: how technology enabled care has transformed people's lives

TSA, THINK LOCAL ACT PERSONAL, ASSOCIATION OF DIRECTORS OF ADULT SOCIAL SERVICES
2018

This publication presents 10 individual stories which show how technology enabled care is transforming people’s lives. The stories are told from the individual’s perspective, using their experiences and their own unique circumstances to communicate what technology enabled care means to them. It shows how people are using technology from apps to smart sensors to enhance their independence, better manage long-term health conditions and enable a better quality of life. They include examples of how technology can help to tackle loneliness, provide reminders for people living with dementia, help children in local authority care to make their voices heard and help people to keep in touch with their friends. By giving a voice to people who are already using a wide range of technology, this resource offers political leaders, commissioners and practitioners a case for change.

Housing adaptations

AUDITOR GENERAL FOR WALES
2018

This report assesses whether organisations with responsibilities for delivering housing adaptations in Wales - which include local authorities, housing associations and Care and Repair agencies - have an effective approach that delivers value for money. It finds that the current system needs to change in order to meet the needs of older and disabled people. The review involved fieldwork at five local authorities and four housing associations, a survey of people who had received adaptations; and an analysis of data and expenditure on current services. It reports that although users express high levels of satisfaction with housing adaptations, the system is complex, reactive and results in people with similar needs often receiving different standards of service because of where they live and who is providing the service. Although public bodies are aware of the benefits of adaptations in supporting independence, ineffective partnership working results in missed opportunities to address needs and avoid and reduce demand and costs in health and social care services. The report makes nine recommendations for improvement, including: for the Welsh Government to set a minimum standard for adaptation work, so people can receive the same standard wherever they live; for local authorities to work more closely with partner agencies who deliver adaptations and streamline the application and delivery processes; and the provision of more accessible versions of information to the public.

Living, not existing: putting prevention at the heart of care for older people in Wales

ROYAL COLLEGE OF OCCUPATIONAL THERAPISTS
2017

This report focuses on the important contribution that occupational therapists can make to support further integration of health and social care in Wales. It looks at the role of occupational therapy in helping older people to remain independent and live in their own communities for as long as possible, preventing or delaying the need for expensive care long-term. The report focuses on three key areas: prevention or delaying the need for care and support; helping older people to remain in their communities; and ensuring equality of access to occupational therapy. It provides recommendations to improve the design and delivery of services and examples of best practice and individual case studies to how occupational therapists can contribution to integrated, person-centred services. These include for occupational therapists to work more closely with general practitioners, take on leadership roles to provide expertise to community providers on the development of person and community centred services; and the development of formal partnership agreements across local housing, health and social care sectors to ensure all older people have access to occupational therapy services.

Quick guide: health and housing

NHS ENGLAND
2016

This is one of a series of quick, online guides providing practical tips and case studies to support health and care systems. It provides practical resources and information for Clinical Commissioning Groups (CCGs) from a range of national and local organisations on how housing and health can work together to prevent and reduce hospital admissions, length of stay, delayed discharge, readmission rates and ultimately improve outcomes. Specifically, the guide describes: how housing can help prevent people from being admitted to hospital – by enabling access to home interventions (social prescribing), improving affordable warm homes (safe, warm housing), improving suitability and accessibility, and providing housing support; how housing can help people be discharged from hospital – through coordination of services, provision of step down services, and accessible housing design; and how housing can support people to remain independent in the community – by enabling informed decisions about home and housing options, providing assistive technology and community equipment, supporting social inclusion, providing supported housing, and promoting healthy lifestyles.

Harnessing social action to support older people: evaluating the Reducing Winter Pressures Fund

GEORGHIOU Theo, et al
2016

Presents the findings of an evaluation of seven social action projects funded by the Cabinet Office, NHS England, Monitor, NHS Trust Development Authority and the Association of Directors of Adult Social Services. The aim of the Reducing Winter Pressures Fund was to scale up and test projects that used volunteers to support older people to stay well, manage health conditions or recover after illness, and thereby reduce pressure on hospitals. The organisations supported by the fund comprised a range of national and local charities. These projects fell into three broad categories: community-based support, supporting discharge from hospital wards, and supporting individuals in A&E department to avoid admissions. Between them, the projects offered a wide range of services to older people – both direct (for example help with shopping or providing transport) and indirect (linking with other services). The evaluation resulted in a mixed set of findings. From the interviews with staff, volunteers and local stakeholders, there was evidence of services that had made an impact by providing practical help, reassurance and connection with other services that could reduce isolation and enable independence. Those involved with the projects felt that volunteers and project staff could offer more time to users than pressurised statutory sector staff, which enabled a fuller understanding of a person’s needs while also freeing up staff time. However, the analysis of hospital activity data in the months that followed people's referral into the projects did not suggest that these schemes impacted on the use of NHS services in the way that was assumed, with no evidence of a reduction in emergency hospital admissions, or in costs of hospital care following referral to the social action projects. The one exception was the project based in an A&E department, which revealed a smaller number of admissions in the short term. The report questions whether these sorts of interventions can ever be fully captured solely using hospital-based data and conceptualising reduced or shortened admissions as a key marker of success.

Wigan Community Link Worker Scheme

NHS Wigan Borough Clinical Commissioning Group

The Wigan Community Link Worker service provides person centred support that enables individuals to access community activities keep them independent, whilst taking greater control of their health and wellbeing, and connecting them to their communities. The service was jointly commissioned by Wigan Borough Clinical Commissioning Group and Wigan Council with the aim of improving the health and wellbeing of local people through better connections to appropriate sources of support in the community. Initially piloted in 2015, run by City Health Care Partnership (CHCP), with 11 practices the service has grown and now covers the whole Borough (63 practices). In March 2016, funding for the service was extended for a year.

Results 1 - 10 of 25

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News

Moving Memory

Moving Memory Practice example about how the Moving Memory Dance Theatre Company is challenging perceived notions of age and ageing.

Chatty Cafe Scheme

Chatty Cafe Scheme Practice example about how the Chatty Cafe Scheme is helping to tackle loneliness by bringing people of all ages together

Oomph! Wellness

Oomph! Wellness Practice example about how Oomph! Wellness is supporting staff to get older adults active and combat growing levels of social isolation

KOMP

KOMP Practice example about how KOMP, designed by No Isolation is helping older people stay connected with their families

LAUGH research project

LAUGH research project Practice example about a research project to develop highly personalised, playful objects for people with advanced dementia
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