#EXCLUDE#
#EXCLUDE#
#EXCLUDE#
#EXCLUDE#

Find prevention records by subject or service provider/commissioner name

  • Key to icons

    • Journal Prevention service example
    • Book Book
    • Digital media Digital media
    • Journal Journal article
    • Free resource Free resource

Results for 'independent living'

Results 1 - 10 of 23

Strategies employed by older people to manage loneliness: systematic review of qualitative studies and model development

KHARICHA Kalpa, et al
2018

Objectives: To (i) systematically identify and review strategies employed by community dwelling lonely older people to manage their loneliness and (ii) develop a model for managing loneliness. Methods: A narrative synthesis review of English-language qualitative evidence, following Economic and Social Research Council guidance. Seven electronic databases were searched (1990–January 2017). The narrative synthesis included tabulation, thematic analysis, and conceptual model development. All co-authors assessed eligibility of final papers and reached a consensus on analytic themes. Results: From 3,043 records, 11 studies were eligible including a total of 502 older people. Strategies employed to manage loneliness can be described by a model with two overarching dimensions, one related to the context of coping (alone or with/in reference to others), the other related to strategy type (prevention/action or acceptance/endurance of loneliness). The dynamic and subjective nature of loneliness is reflected in the variety of coping mechanisms, drawing on individual coping styles and highlighting considerable efforts in managing time, contacting others, and keeping loneliness hidden. Cognitive strategies were used to re-frame negative feelings, to make them more manageable or to shift the focus from the present or themselves. Few unsuccessful strategies were described. Conclusion: Strategies to manage loneliness vary from prevention/action through to acceptance and endurance. There are distinct preferences to cope alone or involve others; only those in the latter category are likely to engage with services and social activities. Older people who deal with their loneliness privately may find it difficult to articulate an inability to cope.

Living well for longer: the economic argument for investing in the health and wellbeing of older people in Wales

EDWARDS Rhiannon Tudor, et al
2018

This report, commissioned by Public Health Wales, explores the economic case for investing in older people in Wales to support people to live longer in good health in older age. It looks at investing in older people as assets, highlighting the importance of their contribution to the economy in Wales and the importance of housing and enabling independence in later life. It then draws on the results of rapid reviews of international and UK evidence to show the relative cost-effectiveness and return on investment on preventing loneliness and social isolation; caring for older carers; and preventing falls. It concludes that enabling people to work for longer, facilitating volunteering and supporting working parents through care of grandchildren brings many economic returns in terms of improving wellbeing; reducing loneliness, and supporting formal and wider community services. In addition co-production enables older people to remain active in the community and provides intergenerational benefits within the community and public sector services. The report concludes that Wales should focus investment on: fully integrated health and care services; maintaining physical and mental well being in older age, with a focus on reducing social isolation and loneliness; maintaining services to promote prevention (particularly falls prevention), rehabilitation and reablement; investment in sustainable homes, transport and communities; and support for informal carers.

Small but significant: the impact and cost benefits of handyperson services

ADAMS Sue
2018

An evaluation of the impacts and cost benefits of handyperson services carrying out small repairs and minor adaptations in the home for older people. It looks at how handyperson service fit into the current policy landscape summarises current evidence on their impact and cost effectiveness. It then provides an in depth evaluation of the of Preston Care and Repair handyperson service, with analysis of outputs, outcomes and examines the cost benefits in relation to falls prevention. The evaluation involved data analysis of jobs completed, a survey of users of the service and interviews with staff and service users. It reports that during the 9 month evaluation period 1,399 jobs were carried out in the homes of 697 older people, which exceeded outcome targets. Of people using the service, 46 percent were over 80 years and 72 percent were older people living alone. Older people also valued the service. Ninety-six percent of those surveyed said that the Preston Care and Repair handyperson service made them less worried about their home and 100 percent said that they would recommend the service to others. Analysis of the falls prevention impact on a small number of higher risk cases, found that for every £1 spent on the handyperson service the saving to health and care was £4.28. Other health and social care related outcomes included a risk reduction for hospital admission risk reduction and faster discharge to home, improved wellbeing, safer independent living, and reduced isolation. The report illustrates the impacts of handyperson services cover health, housing and social care aims and objectives. They also offer a cost effective solution with significant cost benefits and a high rate of return on investment, both financial and social.

What is the impact on health and wellbeing of interventions that foster respect and social inclusion in community-residing older adults? A systematic review of quantitative and qualitative studies

RONZI S., et al
2018

Background: Many interventions have been developed to promote respect and social inclusion among older people, but the evidence on their impacts on health has not been synthesised. This systematic review aims to appraise the state of the evidence across the quantitative and qualitative literature. Methods: Eligible studies published between 1990 and 2015 were identified by scanning seven bibliographic databases using a pre-piloted strategy, searching grey literature and contacting experts. Studies were included if they assessed the impact (quantitatively) and/or perceived impact (qualitatively) of an intervention promoting respect and social inclusion on the physical or mental health of community-residing people aged 60 years and older. Titles and abstracts were screened for eligibility by one reviewer. A second reviewer independently screened a 10% random sample. Full texts were screened for eligibility by one reviewer, with verification by another reviewer. Risk of bias was assessed using standardised tools. Findings were summarised using narrative synthesis, harvest plots and logic models to depict the potential pathways to health outcomes. Results: Of the 27,354 records retrieved, 40 studies (23 quantitative, 6 qualitative, 11 mixed methods) were included. All studies were conducted in high and upper middle-income countries. Interventions involved mentoring, intergenerational and multi-activity programmes, dancing, music and singing, art and culture and information-communication technology. Most studies (n = 24) were at high or moderate risk of bias. Music and singing, intergenerational interventions, art and culture and multi-activity interventions were associated with an overall positive impact on health outcomes. This included depression (n = 3), wellbeing (n = 3), subjective health (n = 2), quality of life (n = 2), perceived stress and mental health (n = 2) and physical health (n = 2). Qualitative studies offered explanations for mediating factors (e.g. improved self-esteem) that may lead to improved health outcomes and contributed to the assessment of causation. Conclusions: Whilst this review suggests that some interventions may positively impact on the health outcomes of older people, and identified mediating factors to health outcomes, the evidence is based on studies with heterogeneous methodologies. Many of the interventions were delivered as projects to selected groups, raising important questions about the feasibility of wider implementation and the potential for population-wide benefits.

Room to improve: the role of home adaptations in improving later life

CENTRE FOR AGEING BETTER
2017

This report summarises the findings from an evidence review on how home adaptations can improve later lives and provides recommendations to improve access to, and delivery of, home adaptation and repair services. It shows that both minor and major home adaptations are an effective intervention to improve outcomes for people in later life, including improved performance of everyday activities, improved mental health and preventing falls and injuries. It also identifies good evidence that greatest outcomes are achieved when individuals and families are involved in the decision-making process, and when adaptations focus on individual goals. Based on the findings, the report makes recommendations for commissioners and service provides. These include for Local Sustainability and Transformation partnerships to put in place preventative strategies to support people at risk in their home environment; for local authorities to make use of the Disabled Facilities Grant to fund both major and minor adaptations; and for local authorities to ensure people have access to information and advice on how home adaptations could benefit them, in line with the Care Act 2014.

The role of home adaptations in improving later life

POWELL Jane, et al
2017

A systematic review of evidence on the effectiveness and cost effectiveness on how home adaptations can contribute in helping older people to maintain their independence for as long as possible and what works best to improve the health and wellbeing. Conducted by a team from the University of the West of England, the review covered peer-reviewed literature and professional and practitioner-led grey literature published between 2000 and 2016. It found evidence that both minor and major home adaptations can improve outcomes for people in later life, including improved performance of everyday activities, improved mental health and preventing falls and injuries. It also identified good evidence that greatest outcomes are achieved when individuals and families are involved in the decision-making process, and when adaptations focus on individual goals. It also found strong evidence that minor home adaptations are an effective and cost-effective intervention. The report also includes analysis from the Building Research Establishment which shows that home interventions to prevent falls on stairs, can lead to savings of £1.62p for every £1 spent. Based on the findings, the report makes recommendations for commissioners and service provides. These include for Local Sustainability and Transformation partnerships to put in place preventative strategies to support people at risk in their home environment; for local authorities to make use of the Disabled Facilities Grant to fund both major and minor adaptations; and for local authorities to ensure people have access to information and advice on how home adaptations could benefit them, in line with the Care Act 2014.

Homeshare UK sector report 2017


2017

This report draws information from surveys and case studies to look at the current status of the Homeshare sector for the period April 2016 to March 2017. Homeshare brings together two people with different needs to share a home for mutual benefit, such as an older Householder being matched with someone needing low cost accommodation who can provide low level support in exchange. The report provides information about the organisations delivering Homeshare, types of schemes, Homeshare matches and participants, and equality and diversity. It reports that demand for Homeshare continues to grow, with an increase in the numbers of people using Homeshare, the numbers of operating schemes and an increase in the number of enquiries. Anecdotal evidence collected from a small sample of family and friends of Householders, Householders and Homesharers also identified a number of benefits for participants, which included a reduction in loneliness, improved quality of life and re-engagement with local social networks.

Housing our ageing population: learning from councils meeting the housing needs of ageing population

LOCAL GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION
2017

The suitability of the housing stock is of critical importance to the health of individuals and also impacts on public spending, particularly social care and the NHS. This report sets out what is required to meet the housing needs and aspirations of an ageing population, outlines the current policy context and presents detailed case studies of good practice to show how councils are innovating to support older people to live in their homes for longer and promote positive ageing. They include examples of integrated approaches to health, housing and care to support older people at home; care and repair schemes to provide support for older people in mainstream housing, long term housing planning; and developing appropriate new housing for older people. The case studies are from Birmingham City Council, Central Bedfordshire Council, Essex County Council, Mansfield District Council, Newcastle City Council, North Somerset, Bristol, Bath and North-East Somerset Councils, and Worcestershire County Council. The report highlights key lessons from the case studies: having a clear vision, promoting awareness and changing attitudes; housing planning, which meets local need and involves older people; delivering and enabling new housing for older people across the public and private sector; developing integrated approaches to housing, health and care; and sustaining older people in mainstream housing. It also outlines recommendations for Government, policy makers, councils, and providers.

The crises facing our independent living service users: research, evaluation and impact

BLANCHARD Catherine, BRITTAIN Andrea
2016

British Red Cross Independent Living services such as Support at Home, Home from Hospital, and Mobility Aids provide time-limited support to help people live independently in their own home. This study explores the challenges facing people using these services, whose increasingly complex needs are creating greater obstacles to their ability to live independently. Phase one of the study conducted interviews with 29 service users, eight volunteers and 22 staff members into the problems service users face to living independently. Phase two used follow up questionnaires with 170 service users to explore key issues in more depth, including carers, mobility, information and advice, social isolation and loneliness. The results of the questionnaires found high levels of mobility reported-difficulties, which could impact on people's ability to maintain existing relationships and over half of respondents found difficult to find information and advice; The research also found that high numbers of service users live alone and also have high levels of social isolation and loneliness that require long-term intervention. Of the167 service users who answered questions on social isolation, 64 per cent experienced 'some' social isolation and a quarter fell into the 'most isolated' group. Drawing on findings, the report makes recommendations for the Independent Living service in relation to service development, advocacy and communications and data collection. These include: for services to be person-centred, consider partnerships and employ good practice in signposting; for the collection of data on whether people live alone, how long they have lived alone; and being clear in communications that loneliness and social isolation are different concepts.

Quick guide: technology in care homes

NHS ENGLAND, et al
2015

This quick guide highlights a number of case studies from around the country where technology is being used successfully to enhance the delivery of care to support independent living (telecare), to enhance the health and wellbeing information exchange between patients and professionals (telehealth) and to enhance the information exchange between professionals (telemedicine). It also includes information about secure email and collaboration. Drawing on the case studies, the guide sets out a series of top tips for developing and implementing successful technological initiatives.

Results 1 - 10 of 23

#EXCLUDE#
News

LAUGH research project

LAUGH research project New practice example about a research project to develop highly personalised, playful objects for people with advanced dementia
View more: News
Ask about support on integration, STPs and transformation
ENQUIRE
Related SCIE content
Related NICE content
Related external content
Visit Social Care Online, the UK’s largest database of information and research on all aspects of social care and social work.
SEARCH NOW
Submit prevention service example
SUBMIT
What do you think about SCIE's work?
FEEDBACK
#EXCLUDE#
#EXCLUDE#
#EXCLUDE#