#EXCLUDE#
#EXCLUDE#

Find prevention records by subject or service provider/commissioner name

  • Key to icons

    • Journal Prevention service example
    • Book Book
    • Digital media Digital media
    • Journal Journal article
    • Free resource Free resource

Results for 'inequalities'

Results 1 - 3 of 3

Loneliness beyond Covid-19: learning the lessons of the pandemic for a less lonely future

JONES Dan, JOPLING Kate, KHARICHA Kalpa
2021

A review of the impact of Covid-19 on UK loneliness and what we can expect in future. The report finds that although restrictions on social contact during lockdown were universal, people had very different experiences of loneliness. Covid-19 exacerbated existing inequalities, meaning that groups already at risk of loneliness – such as those who were poorer, in worse health or from ethnic minorities or LGBTQ+ communities – were at greater risk during the pandemic. Those who were already lonely before the pandemic were likely to become even more lonely. The report finds that organisations responsible for addressing loneliness experienced more demand for their services because: the co-ordinated response to loneliness during the pandemic identified many people who were already lonely, but not previously known to services; the impact of Covid-19 meant that more people were likely to be at risk of chronic loneliness, perhaps because they had lost their job or been ill; people who were already lonely, experienced deep isolation, and many experienced changes in their circumstances as a result of the pandemic which meant they became even more lonely. The report calls on the Government to provide enough funding to maintain services and support for people experiencing chronic loneliness in the wake of the pandemic; ensure that support is particularly targeted at the most disadvantaged communities where loneliness is a particular risk; take action and invest to ensure a ‘connected recovery’, strengthening community capacity, with funding for green spaces, high streets and meeting places as well as transport and digital connectivity.

Social determinants of health and the role of local government

LOCAL GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION
2020

This report explores what local government can do to improve health especially by tackling social determinants. Health improvement has always been a fundamental responsibility of local government and this was emphasised further with the transfer of public health responsibilities in 2013. The report argues that there is little use in simply treating people for a health condition if the cause of that condition is not also addressed. Tackling social determinants includes improvements in housing, education and employment as well as ensuring a health promoting environment. Each of the social determinants of health can be improved to give an overall improvement in the health and wellbeing of communities. The roles that local government undertakes to improve health through tackling social determinants include: civic leadership; as employer and anchor institution; securing services; planning and licensing; as champion of prevention. Local government actions and services are centred around the improvement of wellbeing and the prevention of poor outcomes – this is true for children’s services, adult social care and economic development among many others. Opportunities for health improvement by tackling the social determinants of health have been taken up across the country – the report includes detailed examples and case studies illustrating the opportunities for health improvement and what has already been achieved.

Asset based approaches and inequalities: briefing

AMBITION FOR AGEING
2018

Asset-based approaches can make significant and positive changes to people’s lives. However, if implemented without an understanding of marginalisation, asset-based approaches risk contributing to existing inequalities, excluding those who are the most socially isolated. Using learning from the Ambition for Ageing programme, this briefing highlights the need for recognition of the barriers faced by marginalised groups as a key part of asset-based work. It puts forward a number of solutions, such as supporting marginalised groups to be involved in genuine co-production and asset mapping, using targeted approaches to identify marginalised and social isolated groups, and well-planned processes for enhancing community capacity. It also includes case studies and key findings from the Ambition for Ageing programme in Greater Manchester.

Results 1 - 3 of 3

#EXCLUDE#
News

Prevention in social care

Prevention in social care What it means, the policy context, role for commissioners and practitioners and the evidence base.

H4All wellbeing service

H4All wellbeing service Practice example about how H4All Wellbeing Service is using the Patient Activation Measure (PAM) tool

Moving Memory

Moving Memory Practice example about how the Moving Memory Dance Theatre Company is challenging perceived notions of age and ageing.

Chatty Cafe Scheme

Chatty Cafe Scheme Practice example about how the Chatty Cafe Scheme is helping to tackle loneliness by bringing people of all ages together

Oomph! Wellness

Oomph! Wellness Practice example about how Oomph! Wellness is supporting staff to get older adults active and combat growing levels of social isolation

LAUGH research project

LAUGH research project Practice example about a research project to develop highly personalised, playful objects for people with advanced dementia

KOMP

KOMP Practice example about how KOMP, designed by No Isolation is helping older people stay connected with their families
View more: News
Related SCIE content
Related external content
Visit Social Care Online, the UK’s largest database of information and research on all aspects of social care and social work.
SEARCH NOW
Submit prevention service example
SUBMIT
#EXCLUDE#
#EXCLUDE#