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Results for 'informal care'

Results 1 - 7 of 7

The effectiveness of mindfulness- and acceptance-based interventions for informal caregivers of people with dementia: a meta-analysis

COLLINS Rebecca N., KISHITA Naoko
2019

Background and Objectives: The application of mindfulness- and acceptance-based interventions (MABIs) for informal caregivers of people with dementia (PwD) is relatively novel, and the current state of the evidence base is unclear. This meta-analysis examined the effectiveness of MABIs on reducing symptoms of depression and burden in informal caregivers of PwD. The quality of included studies was evaluated and moderator variables explored. Research Design and Methods: A literature search of six electronic databases (PsycARTICLES, PsycINFO, MEDLINE Complete, SCOPUS, Web of Science, and ProQuest) was conducted from the first available date to 20 December 2016. Inclusion criteria involved studies that quantitatively investigated the impact of MABIs on depression and/or burden in informal caregivers of PwD. Results: Twelve studies, providing data on 321 caregivers, were included. Most used mindfulness-based stress reduction and were conducted in the United States. The average attrition among participants was 15.83%. The pre–post effect of MABIs was large for depression and moderate for burden. These effects were largely maintained at follow-up. Significant heterogeneity of effect sizes was observed, with no significant moderators identified. Study quality varied from very poor to moderately good. Discussion and Implications: The low attrition and moderate to large effects suggest that MABIs are acceptable and beneficial for informal caregivers of PwD. The lack of significant moderators could advocate services using more cost-effective forms of MABIs. Further higher-quality research is needed to improve the robustness of the evidence base and enable a meta-analysis to thoroughly examine and quantify moderator variables.

User requirements for technology to assist aging in place: qualitative study of older people and their informal support networks

ELERS Phoebe, et al
2018

BACKGROUND:Informal support is essential for enabling many older people to age in place. However, there is limited research examining the information needs of older adults' informal support networks and how these could be met through home monitoring and information and communication technologies. OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to investigate how technologies that connect older adults to their informal and formal support networks could assist ageing in place and enhance older adults' health and well-being. METHODS: Semistructured interviews were conducted with 10 older adults and a total of 31 members of their self-identified informal support networks. They were asked questions about their information needs and how technology could support the older adults to age in place. The interviews were transcribed and thematically analysed. RESULTS: The analysis identified three overarching themes: (1) the social enablers theme, which outlined how timing, informal support networks, and safety concerns assist the older adults' uptake of technology, (2) the technology concerns theme, which outlined concerns about cost, usability, information security and privacy, and technology superseding face-to-face contact, and (3) the information desired theme, which outlined what information should be collected and transferred and who should make decisions about this. CONCLUSIONS: Older adults and their informal support networks may be receptive to technology that monitors older adults within the home if it enables ageing in place for longer. However, cost, privacy, security, and usability barriers would need to be considered and the system should be individualizable to older adults' changing needs. The user requirements identified from this study and described in this paper have informed the development of a technology that is currently being prototyped.

Homeshare UK sector report 2017


2017

This report draws information from surveys and case studies to look at the current status of the Homeshare sector for the period April 2016 to March 2017. Homeshare brings together two people with different needs to share a home for mutual benefit, such as an older Householder being matched with someone needing low cost accommodation who can provide low level support in exchange. The report provides information about the organisations delivering Homeshare, types of schemes, Homeshare matches and participants, and equality and diversity. It reports that demand for Homeshare continues to grow, with an increase in the numbers of people using Homeshare, the numbers of operating schemes and an increase in the number of enquiries. Anecdotal evidence collected from a small sample of family and friends of Householders, Householders and Homesharers also identified a number of benefits for participants, which included a reduction in loneliness, improved quality of life and re-engagement with local social networks.

'Three Conversation Model' Transforming Lives Cambridgeshire County Council Adults Learning Disabilities Team

Cambridgeshire County Council

East Cambridgeshire Learning Disability Partnership is a multi disciplinary team providing social care and specialist health input to adults with learning disabilities living in the community. In 2014, Cambridgeshire County Council started its Transforming Lives programme to meet new requirements arising from the Care Act, and as part of this programme the East Cambridgeshire Learning Disability Partnership team began to pilot the Three Conversation Model (pioneered by Partners for Change) in October of that year. The model is now well established in the team and has been rolled out across the council.

Social care for marginalised communities: balancing self-organisation, micro-provision and mainstream support

CARR Sarah
2014

This briefing reviews recent research on social care support provision for certain people with protected characteristics under the Equality Act 2010, who are often seldom heard in mainstream services. It draws out messages for social care micro-providers and social care commissioners, focusing on two areas: the marginalising dynamics in mainstream, statutory social care support provision for certain people with protected characteristics; and how local community, specialist or small-scale services are responding to unmet need for support and advice among marginalised groups. The majority of research identified looked at issues and experiences of black and minority ethnic (BME) communities, with a large number of studies dedicated to understanding the role of family carers, particularly from South Asian backgrounds. A smaller body of work on lesbian, gay and bisexual (LGB) older people and carers was found. Similarly, a number of research studies on support for and by refugees and asylum seekers were identified. Some research on the role of faith was also found. By comparing research findings across several groups, common issues about engagement with mainstream services and the function of community based and specialist support became apparent. The main themes and messages coming from the research for commissioners and providers focus on: strategies for responding to marginalisation from the mainstream, including assets and community mobilisation, reciprocity and social inclusion, informal networks and self-organisation; accessing and engaging with mainstream provision, highlighting issues of fear of discrimination, uniformity and homogenisation, language and communication; relationship dynamics between large, traditional mainstream and small, specialist community, including capacity building and partnerships, advocacy and accessing mainstream support, choice and voice; understanding informal support in diverse communities, in which a key role is played by culture, stigma and shame, well-being, identity and resilience, and faith; and effective approaches, including emotional and social support, and non-conventional, networked and holistic support.

Preventing Crisis for Carers: a Princess Royal Trust for Carers' programme funded by the Moffat Charitable Trust: final evaluation report

KELLY Timothy B., et al
2010

An independent evaluation of the Crisis Prevention Programme, which comprised four individual pilot projects operating in four NHS board areas in Scotland and aimed to get support and advice for carers at an early stage, offer them a carer's assessment, reduce the pressure on their health, get them involved in discharge planning and train health and social care professionals in carer awareness. The evaluation found that the programme resulted in many improvements in hospitals, including: professionals were more likely to identify carers at an early stage and put support for them in place at an earlier stage; there were changes to ways of working which benefited carers; carers reported feeling that professionals had more recognition of their expertise in caring and understood their needs as a carer; carers felt more able to have a say in shaping the services they, or the person they cared for, received; and carers were provided with more information, such as being told of their right to a carer's assessment. The evaluation recommended that funding for carer support workers in hospitals continues and that carer awareness training should be mandatory for all healthcare professionals.

Prevention is better than cure ...

WARD Cally, COOPER Vivien
2013

Purpose: The purpose of this article is to provide a perspective from family carers on the promotion of independence and the prevention of avoidable dependency. Design/methodology/approach: Narrative review and discussion. Findings: Family carers frequently experience their own or their relatives’ needs being met only when they have reached crisis point. A shift to a more preventive approach, delivered in a personalised and family-centred manner, could transform the experiences of people with learning disabilities and their families. Originality/value: Attention is drawn to the importance of strengthening the case for a preventive approach and the role of co-ordinated and strategic leadership in its delivery.

Results 1 - 7 of 7

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News

Moving Memory

Moving Memory Practice example about how the Moving Memory Dance Theatre Company is challenging perceived notions of age and ageing.

Chatty Cafe Scheme

Chatty Cafe Scheme Practice example about how the Chatty Cafe Scheme is helping to tackle loneliness by bringing people of all ages together

Oomph! Wellness

Oomph! Wellness Practice example about how Oomph! Wellness is supporting staff to get older adults active and combat growing levels of social isolation

KOMP

KOMP Practice example about how KOMP, designed by No Isolation is helping older people stay connected with their families

LAUGH research project

LAUGH research project Practice example about a research project to develop highly personalised, playful objects for people with advanced dementia
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