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Results for 'innovation'

Results 1 - 4 of 4

Health and Wellbeing Innovation Commission Inquiry: social connections and loneliness

BEACH Brian
2018

This report reflects on how innovation can help foster and improve social connections to the benefit for all people in an ageing society. It also sets out examples of effective innovation in the area of social connections, opportunities and barriers to further innovation, and recommendations to support innovation. The report is based on an oral evidence session where expert witnesses gave evidence to the commissioners and research from ILC-UK. It is one of four publications from ILC-UK’s Health and Wellbeing Innovation Commission Inquiry, which examined the potential for innovation in the areas of health and wellbeing to ensure that services remain sustainable, address needs efficiently, and contribute to positive experiences in later life.

Adapting for ageing: good practice and innovation in home adaptations

ADAMS Sue, HODGES Martin
2018

This report identifies examples of high-quality and innovative practice in the provision of home adaptations for older people and looks at key factors which constitute good practice. It draws on the results of a 'call for practice' from Care and Repair England to identify examples from local areas that are organising and delivering adaptations effectively. The report looks at why home adaptations are important and the evidence for them, what good and poor practice looks like, enablers and barriers to innovation and improvement; and what could help drive wider uptake of good practice. The report identifies a number of key features which could ensure an excellent home adaption service. These include: raising awareness of what is possible amongst older people and professionals, including the availability and benefits of home adaptations; helping older people navigate the system to access adaptations advice, funding, practical help and related services; speedy delivery of home adaptations; involving older people in home adaptation service design; including home adaptations in strategic planning; integration of home adaptations with health and care; linking adaptations with home repairs; working with handyperson services; involving social housing providers in adaptation provision; and taking a preventative approach.

Innovative models of health, care and support for adults

SOCIAL CARE INSTITUTE FOR EXCELLENCE
2018

This briefing explains that innovative, often small-scale models of health, social care and support for adults could be scaled up to benefit as many people as possible. The challenge is to make scaling up successful. The briefing is based on research conducted during the spring of 2017 by Nesta, SCIE, Shared Lives Plus and PPL. It includes real life examples and case studies to show how stakeholders are involved in building and growing successful and sustainable innovations in health, care and support which provide new ways of delivering relationship-based care. It also identifies key challenges and facilitators to scaling up innovative models and makes recommendations to help make impactful innovative models become part of mainstream care. It includes case studies from North London Carers – a community network of young professionals and older neighbours which helps to reduce loneliness and increase wellbeing; Age UK’s Personalised Integrated Care programme – which brings together voluntary organisations and health and care services to support for older people living with multiple long-term conditions who are at risk of recurring hospital admission; Shared lives - adults either live with or regularly visit their chosen carer; North Yorkshire Innovation Fund – which provides funding to support voluntary and community organisations providing innovative intervention or prevention measures; and Wigan’s place-based approach. To help innovative models to flourish and scale up, it identifies keys to success as: a shared ambition to embed person- and community-centred ways of working; co-production; a new model of leadership which is collaborative and convening; investment and commissioning in approaches which result in high quality outcomes; and use of data to drive change a willingness to learn from experience.

Learning from the vanguards: supporting people and communities to stay well

NHS CONFEDERATION, et al
2018

This briefing explores how the care vanguard sites have sought to design health and care services around the needs of people who use them, focusing on the outcomes that matter to people and tailoring care to their needs and goals. It also explores how the vanguards have adopted community- and asset-based approaches to consider the broadest possible influencers on health and care. This new approach recognises that services should be designed to support people to be more involved in their own care, challenges the traditional divide between patients and professionals, and offers opportunities for better health through increased prevention and supported self-care. The briefing includes examples of practice from the vanguard sites. The briefing is part of a series developed by the NHS Confederation, NHS Clinical Commissioners, NHS Providers and Local Government Association.

Results 1 - 4 of 4

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News

Moving Memory

Moving Memory Practice example about how the Moving Memory Dance Theatre Company is challenging perceived notions of age and ageing.

Chatty Cafe Scheme

Chatty Cafe Scheme Practice example about how the Chatty Cafe Scheme is helping to tackle loneliness by bringing people of all ages together

Oomph! Wellness

Oomph! Wellness Practice example about how Oomph! Wellness is supporting staff to get older adults active and combat growing levels of social isolation

KOMP

KOMP Practice example about how KOMP, designed by No Isolation is helping older people stay connected with their families

LAUGH research project

LAUGH research project Practice example about a research project to develop highly personalised, playful objects for people with advanced dementia
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