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Results for 'integrated care'

Results 1 - 10 of 60

Integration in action: housing services to enable people to stay living independently at home. Homewise Memory Matters: supporting people with memory loss, dementia and their carers at home in East Lancashire

CARE AND REPAIR ENGLAND
2017

This briefing describes the Homewise Memory Matters project for people with memory loss, dementia and their carers. The project supports people with memory loss and dementia to stay at home continuing to live independently keeping them safe and out of hospital and residential care. It also works with their carers to ensure that they are aware of local services including respite care and have a network of support available to them. Project outcomes include: prevention of hospital admission e.g. reduced falls risk; reduced risk of admission to residential care; extended independent living at home; improved wellbeing including support for carers; improved safety and security at home; and reduction in social isolation.

Reducing preventable admissions to hospital and long-term care: a high impact change model

LOCAL GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION
2021

This high impact change model aims to support local care, health, and wellbeing partners to work together to prevent, delay or divert the need for acute hospital or long-term bed-based care. The tool recognises that, while sometimes hospital is the most appropriate place for someone to be, most people want to be at home and independent for as long possible, and that this is generally the best place for them to recover. The model focuses on two goals and five high impact changes that help realise one or both goals. The two goals are: prevent crisis – actions to prevent crises developing or advancing into preventable admissions; stop crisis becoming an admission – actions to divert or prevent an attendance at A&E becoming an admittance to hospital or long-term bed-based care. The five high impact changes and the goal or goals they relate to: population health management approach to identifying those most at risk (Goal 1); target and tailor interventions and support for those most at risk (Goal 1); practise effective multi-disciplinary working (Goals 1 and 2); educate and empower individuals to manage their health and wellbeing (Goals 1 and 2); provide a coordinated and rapid response to crises in the community (Goal 2).

Community-enhanced social prescribing: integrating community in policy and practice

MORRIS David, et al
2020

The NHS Plan is introducing social prescribing link workers into GP surgeries in England. The link workers connect people to non-health resources in the community and voluntary sector, with the aim of meeting individual needs beyond the capacity of the NHS. Social prescribing models focus on enhancing individual wellbeing, guided by the policy of universal personalised care. However, they largely neglect the capacity of communities to meet individual need, particularly in the wake of a decade of austerity. This paper proposes a model of community enhanced social prescribing (CESP) which has the potential to improve both individual and community wellbeing. CESP combines two evidence-informed models – Connected Communities and Connecting People – to address both community capacity and individual need. CESP requires a literacy of community which recognises the importance of communities to individuals and the importance of engaging with, and investing in, communities. When fully implemented the theory of change for CESP is hypothesised to improve both individual and community wellbeing.

“Listen and then listen again”: prevention and promotion of independence for older adults

CARE INSPECTORATE WALES
2020

Explores the progress made by local authority social services and health boards in supporting older adults to be as independent as possible, in line with the Social Services and Well-being Act (Wales) 2014. The research looked at the experiences of people aged over 65 who had received support from social care and health services, focusing on these key themes: people – are their voices heard and do they have control; partnerships, integration and co-production – who is working together and who is designing support together; prevention – how are services stopping people from reaching crisis or from needing care and support; and well-being - what matters to people. The key findings are: People (voice and control) – almost all of the time, people were treated with dignity and respect by care staff who made a positive difference in their lives but more work is needed to make sure that carers have their voices heard; Well-being – the importance of helping older people to maintain their well-being was increasingly recognised as a positive way to promote independence, and an aspect of work many care staff found rewarding; Partnerships and integration – many people benefitted from positive relationships they developed with care staff who treated them as equals but leaders and manager need to develop a culture of sustainability, through working together and designing services together; Prevention – the duty to support people before they reach crisis is not consistently carried out across Wales.

Smart environments and social robots for age-friendly integrated care services

ANGHEL Ionut, et al
2020

The world is facing major societal challenges because of an aging population that is putting increasing pressure on the sustainability of care. While demand for care and social services is steadily increasing, the supply is constrained by the decreasing workforce. The development of smart, physical, social and age-friendly environments is identified by World Health Organization (WHO) as a key intervention point for enabling older adults, enabling them to remain as much possible in their residences, delay institutionalization, and ultimately, improve quality of life. This study surveyed smart environments, machine learning and robot assistive technologies that can offer support for the independent living of older adults and provide age-friendly care services. This study describes two examples of integrated care services that are using assistive technologies in innovative ways to assess and deliver of timely interventions for polypharmacy management and for social and cognitive activity support in older adults. This study describes the architectural views of these services, focusing on details about technology usage, end-user interaction flows and data models that are developed or enhanced to achieve the envisioned objective of healthier, safer, more independent and socially connected older people.

Strengths, assets and place - the emergence of Local Area Coordination initiatives in England and Wales

LUNT Neil, BAINBRIDGE Laura, RIPPON Simon
2021

Summary: Local Area Coordination is an approach that emerged during the 1980s and 1990s to support individuals with learning disabilities in rural and metropolitan Western Australia. Offering direct family support, signposting and networking it aimed to improve access to services and promote social inclusion. It leveraged community resources and sought broader transformation through local collaborations and service redesign, as underpinned by a strengths-based philosophy. Scotland introduced a similar model of delivery from the early 2000s for learning disability support. Since 2010, a number of English and Welsh Local Authorities have introduced Local Area Coordination, and in doing so have expanded its support eligibility criteria to include those considered ‘vulnerable’ due to age, frailty, disability, mental health issues and housing precariousness. Findings: This article provides the first review of developments in England and Wales. Drawing upon published evaluation studies it reflects on Local Area Coordination implementation; reviews the existing evidence base and challenges surrounding data collection; and discusses the competing logic of Local Area Coordination in its aim of supporting individual and community improvement of health outcomes and well-being, and of furthering local government civic engagement and participation. Applications: This article points to the challenges and opportunities of implementing such a strength-, assets- and placed-based initiatives within Local Authority social service settings. Embedding Local Area Coordination within Local Authority settings requires skilled political and policy leadership. It balances emerging individual outcomes – health and well-being – with the civic mission (values, control and coproduction), and avoids one being subverted to the other.

Evaluation of Leicestershire Local Area Coordination: final report

M·E·L RESEARCH
2020

This evaluation of Leicestershire Local Area Coordination (LAC) has comprised both formative (process) and summative (outcome) elements. LAC is a complex community-based intervention, delivered in 10 very different local areas in four of the County’s Districts, operationally delivered by 8 Coordinators with varied backgrounds and different working styles. It is designed to have an impact on three levels: individual, community, and health and social care integration. The evaluation finds that LAC has been effective in achieving its ‘founding’ aims and strategic objectives for individuals (a strong focus on assets-based approaches and a community model of delivery, aimed at ‘upstream prevention’ working with vulnerable residents at risk of crisis). LAC has been moderately effective in achieving its aims and objectives around HSC integration but has been less effective in delivering its’ community-based objectives. The SROI findings provide positive evidence of measurable outcomes for LAC, demonstrating positive SROI ratio of £4.10 in accumulated benefit for every £1 spent. It has been more challenging to make LAC successful (and therefore LAC is likely to have less impact for residents) in areas with less community infrastructure; and as LAC is not a prescriptive service, the impact of LAC for some beneficiaries may be lessened as they may not be ready to take the steps to help them move forward. The most successful elements of LAC have comprised: the relationships between coordinators, and beneficiaries and local partners – trust, flexibility and effective networking; coordinator knowledge of local assets and ability to match this with beneficiary support needs; coordinators being located within the communities they work; the lack of specific agenda for coordinators making them less threatening; and the personal skills and commitment of the coordinator team.

Prevention in social care: where are we now?

WAVEHILL SOCIAL AND ECONOMIC RESEARCH, SKILLS FOR CARE
2019

This report draws together the main findings from a research study, which aimed to provide an overview of the published and unpublished literature relating to prevention in social care; consult with stakeholders to understand more about engagement with the prevention agenda; and identify examples of practice in England to learn more about how prevention is working in social care. The literature identified five key approaches to prevention: advice and guidance; physical activity promotion; social prescribing; reablement; and asset-based approaches. For each approach, the report provides a brief outline and examples of good practice. The report also looks at the interplay between prevention and the integration agenda, focusing on new care models, wellbeing teams, and new and emerging job roles; explores how to develop capacity in social care, through learning and development resources, use of technology, and commissioning and contracting; and examines the critical factors to effectively implement and embed prevention in practice.

Total transformation of care and support

SOCIAL CARE INSTITUTE FOR EXCELLENCE
2017

This updated version of 'Total transformation of care and support: future of care', originally published in 2016, looks at how transformed and integrated health and care could improve outcomes and cost effectiveness of services. It outlines five areas where transformation needs to take place and where health and care systems can help older and disabled people build a good quality life. It identifies six well-evidenced models, which demonstrate how to combine scarce state resources with the capacity of individuals, families and communities. Using data from Birmingham City Council, it explores the potential for scaling up these six schemes, modelling their outcomes, costs and estimated financial benefits. It also highlights key enablers that could help areas implement each scheme. The models cover an initiative to help isolated older people; the Living Well scheme to improve resilience amongst older people; a service to support adults with learning disabilities to become independent; Shared Lives; a scheme to improve hospital discharge, and support for people following a hospital stay. Appendices include a template to help structure conversations with local citizens and stakeholders about transforming. It is the third of SCIE's Future of care series, which aims to stimulate discussion amongst policy-makers and planners about the future of care and support.

Delivering neighbourhood-level integrated care in Norfolk

COMMUNITY NETWORK
2020

This case study illustrates how integrated services are being delivered in Norfolk. Norfolk Community Health and Care NHS Trust’s vision is to improve the quality of people’s lives in their homes and community through the best in integrated health and social care. The trust works predominantly with 14 primary care networks (PCNs) across the area served by Norfolk and Waveney Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG), and with the Norfolk and Waveney Health and Care Partnership at system level. This includes collaborating with three acute trusts, one mental health trust, Norfolk County Council and the East of England Ambulance Service Trust. Examples of collaborative working include rapid assessment frailty team; early intervention vehicles, involving occupational therapists working with emergency medical technicians; Norfolk escalation avoidance team; and a high intensity user service. Key lessons emerging from this case study are: effective collaborative working requires good relationships across the board; do not underestimate the differences in culture and working practices between different organisations; invest in ensuring there is the right technology available for staff to use; engage with staff in a meaningful way to develop strategies to improve their health and wellbeing as this in turn will lead to improvement in services; and invest in pilot projects to test out integrated working between organisations but plan for how they can be maintained long term.

Results 1 - 10 of 60

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News

Prevention in social care

Prevention in social care What it means, the policy context, role for commissioners and practitioners and the evidence base.

H4All wellbeing service

H4All wellbeing service Practice example about how H4All Wellbeing Service is using the Patient Activation Measure (PAM) tool

Moving Memory

Moving Memory Practice example about how the Moving Memory Dance Theatre Company is challenging perceived notions of age and ageing.

Chatty Cafe Scheme

Chatty Cafe Scheme Practice example about how the Chatty Cafe Scheme is helping to tackle loneliness by bringing people of all ages together

Oomph! Wellness

Oomph! Wellness Practice example about how Oomph! Wellness is supporting staff to get older adults active and combat growing levels of social isolation

LAUGH research project

LAUGH research project Practice example about a research project to develop highly personalised, playful objects for people with advanced dementia

KOMP

KOMP Practice example about how KOMP, designed by No Isolation is helping older people stay connected with their families
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