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Results for 'integrated care'

Results 1 - 10 of 43

“It was the whole picture” a mixed methods study of successful components in an integrated wellness service in North East England

CHEETHAM M., et al
2018

Background: A growing number of Local Authorities (LAs) have introduced integrated wellness services as part of efforts to deliver cost effective, preventive services that address the social determinants of health. This study examined which elements of an integrated wellness service in the north east of England were effective in improving health and wellbeing (HWB). Methods: The study used a mixed-methods approach. In-depth semi-structured interviews (IVs) were conducted with integrated wellness service users (n = 25) and focus groups (FGs) with group based service users (n = 14) and non-service users (n = 23) to gather the views of stakeholders. Findings are presented here alongside analysis of routine monitoring data. The different data were compared to examine what each data source revealed about the effectiveness of the service. Results: Findings suggest that integrated wellness services work by addressing the social determinants of health and respond to multiple complex health and social concerns rather than single issues. The paper identifies examples of ‘active ingredients’ at the heart of the programme, such as sustained relationships, peer support and confidence building, as well as the activities through which changes take place, such as sports and leisure opportunities which in turn encourage social interaction. Wider wellbeing outcomes, including reduced social isolation and increased self-efficacy are also reported. Practical and motivational support helped build community capacity by encouraging community groups to access funding, helped navigate bureaucratic systems, and promoted understanding of marginalised communities. Fully integrated wellness services could support progression opportunities through volunteering and mentoring. Conclusions: An integrated wellness service that offers a holistic approach was valued by service users and allowed them to address complex issues simultaneously. Few of the reported health gains were captured in routine data. Quantitative and qualitative data each offered a partial view of how effectively services were working.

Innovative models of health, care and support for adults

SOCIAL CARE INSTITUTE FOR EXCELLENCE
2018

This briefing explains that innovative, often small-scale models of health, social care and support for adults could be scaled up to benefit as many people as possible. The challenge is to make scaling up successful. The briefing is based on research conducted during the spring of 2017 by Nesta, SCIE, Shared Lives Plus and PPL. It includes real life examples and case studies to show how stakeholders are involved in building and growing successful and sustainable innovations in health, care and support which provide new ways of delivering relationship-based care. It also identifies key challenges and facilitators to scaling up innovative models and makes recommendations to help make impactful innovative models become part of mainstream care. It includes case studies from North London Carers – a community network of young professionals and older neighbours which helps to reduce loneliness and increase wellbeing; Age UK’s Personalised Integrated Care programme – which brings together voluntary organisations and health and care services to support for older people living with multiple long-term conditions who are at risk of recurring hospital admission; Shared lives - adults either live with or regularly visit their chosen carer; North Yorkshire Innovation Fund – which provides funding to support voluntary and community organisations providing innovative intervention or prevention measures; and Wigan’s place-based approach. To help innovative models to flourish and scale up, it identifies keys to success as: a shared ambition to embed person- and community-centred ways of working; co-production; a new model of leadership which is collaborative and convening; investment and commissioning in approaches which result in high quality outcomes; and use of data to drive change a willingness to learn from experience.

Housing adaptations

AUDITOR GENERAL FOR WALES
2018

This report assesses whether organisations with responsibilities for delivering housing adaptations in Wales - which include local authorities, housing associations and Care and Repair agencies - have an effective approach that delivers value for money. It finds that the current system needs to change in order to meet the needs of older and disabled people. The review involved fieldwork at five local authorities and four housing associations, a survey of people who had received adaptations; and an analysis of data and expenditure on current services. It reports that although users express high levels of satisfaction with housing adaptations, the system is complex, reactive and results in people with similar needs often receiving different standards of service because of where they live and who is providing the service. Although public bodies are aware of the benefits of adaptations in supporting independence, ineffective partnership working results in missed opportunities to address needs and avoid and reduce demand and costs in health and social care services. The report makes nine recommendations for improvement, including: for the Welsh Government to set a minimum standard for adaptation work, so people can receive the same standard wherever they live; for local authorities to work more closely with partner agencies who deliver adaptations and streamline the application and delivery processes; and the provision of more accessible versions of information to the public.

Chief Social Worker for Adults annual report 2017-18. From strength to strength: strengths-based practice and achieving better lives

GREAT BRITAIN. Department of Health and Social Care
2018

This report sets out progress in improving the education, training and practice of social work with adults in England during 2016-17 and outlines priorities to further raise the quality and profile of adult social work in 2018-19. Themed around strengths-based social work practice, the report offers examples of social workers using asset and strengths-based practice approaches. It also reviews how adult social work is reshaping the culture of adult social care and the way organisations collaborate across health, community and voluntary sectors to maintain people’s quality of life and independence. It highlights a number of practice developments in the sector, covering strengths-based approaches, initiatives working to develop the social care workforce, integrated care, and work by hospital social work teams to reduce delayed transfers of care from hospital. Key priorities identified by the Chief Social Work for Adults for 2018-19 include promoting the value of social work practice with adults in personalising high quality health and social care integrated outcomes for people and their carers; to raise the quality of practice; and to improve productivity through social work practice that works in partnership with people to co-produce support.

Tapping the potential: lessons from the Richmond Group's practical collaborative work in Somerset

NEW PHILANTHROPY CAPITAL
2018

This report captures early learning from a project to building meaningful collaboration between the voluntary and statutory sector in Somerset. It is the latest report from the Doing the Right Thing programme, which aimed to achieve better outcomes for people living with long-term health conditions and reduced demand on health and social care services through collaborative design and delivery. The report identifies benefits of collaboration and system change led by the voluntary and community sector. It also highlights some of the challenges around sustainability, measuring outcomes and ensuring involvement of large national charities is inclusive of the wider voluntary sector in a place. Key findings highlight the benefits of coming to collaboration with no pre-conceived ideas about products or providers; that turning an open-ended conversation between the voluntary sector and public bodies into a productive collaboration requires resource; the benefits of bridging organisations, such as the Richmond Group, and people who make it their job to connect divergent cultures, languages, and priorities; and the agility and stability that voluntary sector leadership can offer to place-based collaborations in a changing healthcare landscape. The report also discusses the wider implications of the research, and the issues it raises around health and care transformation, placed-based collaboration, and evidence for complex interventions. The report will be of particular interest to those seeking to improve collaboration and commission services across the health and care system and also provides practical insights into cross-sector collaboration.

Untapped potential: bringing the voluntary sector's strengths to health and care transformation

WESTON Andrew, et al
2016

This report highlights the potential of the voluntary and community sectors to help shape health and care reform, and identifies the added-value that the sector can bring. The research was commissioned by the Richmond Group of Charities and it assessed the findings of 175 evaluations into how the voluntary sector's offer can be integrated into the health and care system of the future. It also presents a framework for a shared language, to help charities describe their work and its value, and to give commissioners and policymakers a way to identify the aspects of charities’ work that most clearly match their needs. The majority of findings reviewed related to health and wellbeing outcomes. The review found strong evidence that charities achieve health and wellbeing outcomes through direct treatment and support and supported self-management and good evidence that charities deliver health and wellbeing and productivity and efficiency outcomes through system redesign. The report concludes that charities can add value to the health and care system in a range of ways and that charities have a legitimate role in the transformation of the NHS and the wider health and care system in the coming years. The report makes recommendations that could support the voluntary, community and statutory sectors to change their behaviour to support this changes happen at a faster pace.

Learning from the vanguards: supporting people and communities to stay well

NHS CONFEDERATION, et al
2018

This briefing explores how the care vanguard sites have sought to design health and care services around the needs of people who use them, focusing on the outcomes that matter to people and tailoring care to their needs and goals. It also explores how the vanguards have adopted community- and asset-based approaches to consider the broadest possible influencers on health and care. This new approach recognises that services should be designed to support people to be more involved in their own care, challenges the traditional divide between patients and professionals, and offers opportunities for better health through increased prevention and supported self-care. The briefing includes examples of practice from the vanguard sites. The briefing is part of a series developed by the NHS Confederation, NHS Clinical Commissioners, NHS Providers and Local Government Association.

Prevention in action: how prevention and integration are being understood and prioritised locally in England

FIELD Olivia
2017

This report provides a picture of local developments in preventative services in England and highlights examples of good practice. It aimed to explore the extent to which local authorities, sustainability and transformation partnerships, and health and wellbeing boards across England recognise and prioritise the Care Act’s understanding of prevention, as well as to better understand how and to what extent local decision makers are integrating health and social care. The methodology included a review of joint health and wellbeing strategies and sustainability and transformation plans, and a Freedom of Information (FOI) request to local authorities. The report finds that while local authorities across England have made efforts to implement preventative services and identifies examples of innovation and good practice, the Care Act’s vision for prevention is not being fully realised and that local authorities in England need to provide more services that prevent, reduce or delay the need for care and support. The report also identified shortcomings in plans for integrating health and social care. Barriers to implementing preventive services include: a lack of clarity on what is meant by prevention and integration, resistance to cultural change, and reduced resources. The report makes recommendations to support a better and integrated, preventative care system.

Housing our ageing population: learning from councils meeting the housing needs of ageing population

LOCAL GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION
2017

The suitability of the housing stock is of critical importance to the health of individuals and also impacts on public spending, particularly social care and the NHS. This report sets out what is required to meet the housing needs and aspirations of an ageing population, outlines the current policy context and presents detailed case studies of good practice to show how councils are innovating to support older people to live in their homes for longer and promote positive ageing. They include examples of integrated approaches to health, housing and care to support older people at home; care and repair schemes to provide support for older people in mainstream housing, long term housing planning; and developing appropriate new housing for older people. The case studies are from Birmingham City Council, Central Bedfordshire Council, Essex County Council, Mansfield District Council, Newcastle City Council, North Somerset, Bristol, Bath and North-East Somerset Councils, and Worcestershire County Council. The report highlights key lessons from the case studies: having a clear vision, promoting awareness and changing attitudes; housing planning, which meets local need and involves older people; delivering and enabling new housing for older people across the public and private sector; developing integrated approaches to housing, health and care; and sustaining older people in mainstream housing. It also outlines recommendations for Government, policy makers, councils, and providers.

The Lightbulb project: switched on to integration in Leicestershire

MORAN Alison
2017

A case study of the Lightbulb project, which brings together County and District Councils and other partners in Leicestershire to help people stay in their homes for as long as possible. The approach includes GPs and other health and care professionals and relies on early at home assessment process at key points of entry. This is delivered through a ‘hub and spoke’ model with an integrated Locality Lightbulb Team in each District Council area and covers: minor adaptations and equipment; DFGs; wider housing support needs (warmth, energy, home security); housing related health and wellbeing (AT, falls prevention); planning for the future (housing options); and housing related advice, information, and signposting. The Lightbulb service also includes a cost effective specialist Hospital Housing Enabler Team based in acute and mental health hospital settings across Leicestershire. The team work directly with patients and hospital staff to identify and resolve housing issues that are a potential barrier to hospital discharge and also provide low level support to assist with the move home from hospital to help prevent readmissions.

Results 1 - 10 of 43

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