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Results for 'interagency cooperation'

Results 1 - 6 of 6

The role of housing in effective hospital discharge

SKILLS FOR CARE, CHARTERED INSTITUTE OF HOUSING
2017

A collection of case studies from a wide range of housing providers, highlighting the role they can play in developing hospital discharge services. The case studies demonstrate the development of effective partnerships to meet hospital discharge needs, how these partnerships can help meet partners’ targets, and the workforce skills required to ensure effective services. Key learning points from the case studies include recognising and understanding different working cultures; building lasting relationships; effective and safe communication of information between agencies; developing sustainable and long term provision; and building a person centred solution. The publication will be particularly useful for social care and health commissioners, providers of housing and support and workforce development leads.

More than shelter: supported accommodation and mental health

BOARDMAN Jed
2016

This report looks at evidence about the provision of supported housing for people with mental health problems in England, including those with multiple needs and substance misuse, and presents key themes for its future development. It highlights the significant links between housing and mental wellbeing, indicating that factors such as overcrowding, insufficient daylight and fear of crime all contribute to poorer mental health. The review identifies a wide range of types of housing support, including help for people to remain their own tenancies to specialist supported accommodation, hostels, crisis houses and the Housing First approach. Although the review identified limited evidence about what kinds of housing support are most effective and cost-effective, small-scale studies suggest that housing support can reduce the costs of hospital stays. When looking at the type of support people want, the literature found most people prefer help in their own homes to being in sheltered or transitional accommodation. The report calls for better provision of housing support and also argues that housing support should be funded jointly by local authorities and the NHS to ensure that services are delivered in partnership between health, housing and social care providers.

Lack of communication between children's and adults' social care: practice issues from Serious Case Reviews

NATIONAL SOCIETY FOR THE PREVENTION OF CRUELTY TO CHILDREN, SOCIAL CARE INSTITUTE FOR EXCELLENCE
2016

Briefing paper which looks at lack of communication and information sharing between children's and adult's social care in child protection services. It is one of a series 14 briefings looking at difficult issues in inter-professional communication and decision-making identified from 38 Serious Case Reviews, with added information gathered from three multi-agency ‘summits’. Drawing on the analysis of serious care review reports, the briefing highlights the reasons why there can be a lack of communication between adult's social care and children's social care, which include: a lack of understanding of each others roles and of how to work together in order to attain a whole-family assessment. It also provides solutions suggested by summit participants and contains a set of self-assessment questions to support managers and practitioners to tackle similar issues in their own local area.

Growing old together: sharing new ways to support older people

COMMISSION ON IMPROVING URGENT CARE FOR OLDER PEOPLE
2016

Final report from the Commission on Improving Urgent Care for Older People which provides guidance for those involved in designing care for older people and outlines eight key principles the health and care sector can adopt to improve urgent care for older people. The Commission was established out of a concern that the care system was not meeting the needs of older people, resulting in lower quality of care, a lack of out-of-hospital services as an alternative to A&E, not enough focus on prevention and early intervention, and delayed transfers of care. It brought together a range of experts, received over 60 evidence submissions; carried out visits to sites using innovative ways to deliver care; consulted with NHS Confederation members and patient and carer groups; and commissioned an evidence review. The report draws on the evidence to look at the case for change. It then outlines eight key principles that can be used when redesigning health and social care system: start with care driven by the person’s needs and personal goals; a greater focus on proactive care; acknowledge current strains on the system and allow time to think; the importance of care co-ordination and navigation; greater use of multi-disciplinary and multi-agency teams; ensure workforce, training and core skills reflect modern day requirements; leadership should encourage us to do things differently; and metrics must truly reflect the care experience for older people. Short case studies of innovative practice are included in the report, covering acute and primary care, voluntary sector and local government partners and commissioners.

MDT development: working toward an effective multidisciplinary/multiagency team

NHS ENGLAND
2015

One of three handbooks to support commissioners, GP practices and community health and care professionals in planning and providing personalised care for people living with long term conditions. The handbook brings together information about multi-disciplinary and integrated teams and looks at the types of teams that need to be in place to deliver integrated healthcare. It provides definitions of multi-disciplinary and multi-agency teams and also sets out a tool, the MDT Continuum, that describes different types of care team functioning. Four models or stages of multidisciplinary teams are presented, ranging from from unidisciplinary to transdisciplinary team working. Good practice examples representing each of the stages or models. The final section provide information to help integrated commissioning. Other handbooks published separately cover risk stratification and case finding and personalised care and support planning.

Beginning with the end in mind: how outcomes-based commissioning can help unlock the potential of community services

NHS CONFEDERATION. Community Health Services Forum
2014

Explains outcomes-based commissioning and outlines how it might help enable service transformation. Outcomes-based commissioning incentivises high-value interventions, shifting resources to services in the community, a focus on keeping people healthy and in their own homes, delivering outcomes that matter to people using the services, and coordinated care. It discusses the opportunities that outcomes-based commissioning gives for providers of community services, including the main technical considerations that will need to be addressed. Health outcomes have become the standard for measuring successful care. More and more people are living with long-term, and often multiple, conditions. This briefing argues that successful care for this group of people is not about providing a cure or a certain number of procedures, but about enabling and supporting them to live as well as possible with their conditions over the long term. Achieving this will involve transforming the system so that all of its parts work in an integrated way towards the outcomes people want and need most. Unlocking the unmet potential in community settings is crucial in both transforming care and improving efficiency. The briefing includes practical examples showcasing how community providers are using innovative ways of supporting and enabling people with high levels of clinical need to be cared for at home or more locally, and are working in partnership with other health and care providers. It will be of interest to all commissioners and providers considering developing an outcomes-based commissioning approach that includes community health services. It is particularly relevant to providers of community services.

Results 1 - 6 of 6

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