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Results for 'intergenerational relationships'

Results 1 - 10 of 22

Effectiveness and sustainability of volunteering with older people living in care homes: a mixed methods systematic review

HANDLEY Melanie, et al
2021

Older people living in care homes should be considered part of the wider local community; however, little is known about what enables them to connect with people not paid to look after them or family members. Volunteering can complement paid and familial support. While volunteering is common in community settings, care home residents are less likely to benefit from their input. We conducted a mixed methods systematic review and stakeholder consultation that aimed to identify volunteer activities in care homes and evidence for their effectiveness and sustainability. Databases were searched from 2000 to July 2021. Studies of all designs reporting volunteer-led activities with care home residents 65-years or over were included. Data on interventions, study population, study context, outcomes and implementation issues were extracted and synthesised. We identified 36 studies on the use, effectiveness and implementation of volunteering in care homes, although the overall strength of evidence was weak. Resident engagement and mood appeared to improve during volunteer-led activities, but there was little research examining the longer-term impact. Qualitative and stakeholder data suggest considerable investment is needed to initiate and maintain volunteering initiatives, but there are positive benefits for volunteers, residents and staff if an intervention is sustained. Financial cost for care home facilities is unclear. Interventions that address inequalities in accessing volunteer support within the resident population and between facilities should be considered.

Intergenerational programmes bringing together community dwelling non-familial older adults and children: a systematic review

PETERS Ruth, et al
2021

Background: Social isolation is associated with an increased risk of adverse health outcomes, including functional decline, cognitive decline, and dementia. Intergenerational engagement, i.e. structured or semi structured interactions between non-familial older adults and younger generations is emerging as tool to reduce social isolation in older adults and to benefit children and adults alike. This has great potential for our communities, however, the strength and breadth of the evidence for this is unclear. The researchers undertook a systematic review to summarise the existing evidence for intergenerational interventions with community dwelling non-familial older adults and children, to identify the gaps and to make recommendations for the next steps. Methods: Medline, Embase and PsychInfo were searched from inception to the 28th Sept 2020. Articles were included if they reported research studies evaluating the use of non-familial intergenerational interaction in community dwelling older adults. PROSPERO registration number CRD42020175927 Results: Twenty articles reporting on 16 studies were included. Although all studies reported positive effects in general, numerical outcomes were not recorded in some cases, and outcomes and assessment tools varied and were administered un-blinded. Caution is needed when making interpretations about the efficacy of intergenerational programmes for improving social, health and cognitive outcomes. Discussion: Overall, there is neither strong evidence for nor against community based intergenerational interventions. The increase in popularity of intergenerational programmes alongside the strong perception of potential benefit underscores the urgent need for evidence-based research.

Activities outside of the care setting for people with dementia: a systematic review

D'CUNHA Nathan Martin, et al
2020

Objectives To summarise the evidence from interventions investigating the effects of out of care setting activities on people with dementia living in residential aged care. Design A systematic review. Methods: A systematic search of electronic databases (PubMed, PsycINFO, Scopus, Web of Science and the Cochrane Library) was performed to identify intervention trials published from journal inception to January 2020. Controlled trials, or quasi-experimental trials, which measured pre-intervention, post-intervention or during-intervention outcomes, where the participants were required to leave the care setting to participate in an intervention, were eligible for inclusion. Quality appraisal of the studies was performed following the Cochrane Collaboration’s Risk of Bias or Newcastle-Ottawa Scale tools. Results: Of the 4155 articles screened, 11 articles met the inclusion criteria from 9 different studies. The number of participants in the studies ranged from 6 to 70 people living with dementia and lasted for 3 weeks up to 5 months. The interventions were aquatic exercise, wheelchair cycling, art gallery discussion groups, an intergenerational mentorship programme, horse riding, walking and outdoor gardening. Overall, the studies indicated preliminary evidence of psychological (n=7), physical (n=4) and physiological (n=1) benefits, and all interventions were feasible to conduct away from the aged care facilities. However, the low number of participants in the included studies (n=177), the absence of a control group in all but three studies, and potential for selection bias, limits the generalisability of the findings. Conclusions: Activities outside of the residential aged care setting have the potential to be effective at providing a range of benefits for people living with dementia. Higher quality studies are required to encourage care providers to implement these type of activities in dementia care settings.

Hear and now: the impact of an intergenerational arts and health project on participant wellbeing

JENKINS Lindsay, FARRER Rachel, AUJLA Imogen
2020

This research explores the impact that an intergenerational arts and health project can have upon wellbeing, with a particular focus on the benefits that intergenerational practice can provide in relation to quality of life, affect, and social inclusion. It is based on Hear and Now, an award-winning, intergenerational community arts project developed by the Philharmonia Orchestra and Orchestras Live in Bedford, which brought together older adults living with dementia and young people. The study looked at the impact on the participant end users, and also the experiences of their carers and the artists and support staff who facilitated the project. Data were collected through observations of the workshops and focus groups. Researchers used the PERMA model of wellbeing to reflect on the impact of the project. The results found that participants reported: many positive emotions; a high level of engagement; the creation of positive relationships and new connections; that the project had meaning and that they felt of value; and an overall sense of achievement and accomplishment. The findings highlight the holistic impact of intergenerational arts and its ability to create a sense of belonging and purpose that unites different sectors of the community. The report also highlights key learning for future projects.

Together in the 2020s: twenty ideas for creating a Britain for all ages by 2030

UNITED FOR ALL AGES
2020

This report presents 20 innovative ideas to bring older and younger people together and create a stronger society. The ideas cover three areas of public life: practical intergenerational projects, social and economic policies, and culture, media and sport. The report also highlights how intergenerational projects can change attitudes, improve older people’s health and care, tackle loneliness and increase trust and understanding between generations. The ideas include enabling more care homes to become community hubs; extending schools’ opening hours to provide community spaces for intergenerational activities; scaling up homesharing schemes for older and younger people; and the creation of a government department to join up and support intergenerational action. The recommendations draw on contributions from 25 national and local organisations.

The intergenerational evaluation toolkit

JARROTT Shannon
2019

Intergenerational shared sites and intergenerational programmes that bring younger and older generations together can have many positive benefits. This Toolkit provides three resources to support programme providers and researchers to demonstrate the impact of intergenerational programming and the practices which achieve outcomes. The toolkit includes an Intergenerational Practice Evaluation tool to evaluate single intergenerational activities and the impact of programmes over time; a guide to planning an intergenerational evaluation; and a list of reliable outcome measures. The toolkit has been developed following 15 years of collaborative innovative practice and evaluation research.

Ageing Better in Camden: interim evaluation report

REMBISZEWSKI Perla, BIDEY Tim, VANSON Tim
2018

The first of two interim evaluation reports to explore the outcomes projects commissioned by Ageing Better in Camden (ABC), a six-year programme to address social isolation and loneliness in older people living in Camden. This report focuses on the progress of 8 projects, which include a Digital Inclusion project; North London Cares Intergenerational and Men’s Action projects; Community Action Projects, and LGBT+ Connect providing opportunities for older Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Trans people in Camden to socialise. Each project focused chapter includes details of participants, evidence of impact and individual case studies. The evaluation draws on qualitative data from conversations with project participants and project leads, as well as quantitative data from demographic surveys. Early findings suggest that the projects are achieving the anticipated positive impacts for older people. Positive impacts include: improved mental and physical well-being; new friendships and connections; improved confidence and independence; relationship building across communities and generations. The evaluation found that frontline staff played a key role in enabling participants to achieve positive impacts.

Is co-living a good choice to support healthy, happy ageing at home? Summary and conclusions

BURGESS Gemma
2019

A summary of research carried out by the Cambridge Centre for Housing and Planning Research to explore the extent to which co-living housing models might provide a good housing solution for people as they get older. Co-living is a form of housing that combines private living spaces with shared communal facilities, and explicitly seeks to promote social contact and build community. Models include cohousing communities where people live together in a community setting and homeshares, where an older person lives alongside a younger person. This research summary outlines some of the benefits and risks of co-living models.

Healing the generational divide: interim report on intergenerational connection

ALL-PARTY PARLIAMENTARY GROUP ON SOCIAL INTEGRATION
2019

Interim report of the All-Party Parliamentary Group (APPG) on Social Integration inquiry on intergenerational connection, which examines the current gap between older and younger people, and what can be done to bridge it. The report sets out a series of suggestions to bring people of all ages and backgrounds together under four main policy areas: community projects and initiatives; public services; housing and planning; and technology. The report highlights how intergenerational projects are particularly effective in achieving social integration, improving wellbeing and tackling loneliness. It also includes examples of successful initiatives It highlights the benefits of taking a whole-society approach, including all policy areas and involving national and local government, not-for-profit organisations, the private sector and academia. Specific recommendations include: for nurseries, schools and care homes to foster connections between the different generations who use their services and, where possible, to co-locate services on one site and the creation of a national volunteering scheme that encourages older people to volunteer in their communities when they retire.

North London Cares and South London Cares evaluation: final report

HITCHIN John, PETIE Olivia, NORRLANDER Amanda
2019

An evaluation Love Your Neighbour and Social Clubs, two programmes to reduce loneliness, improve intergenerational relationships and create a greater sense of community. The programmes, which aimed to bring together people of different generations to spend time together, were delivered across the London based charities North London Cares and South London Cares as part of The Cares Family’s model. The Social clubs programme brings together groups of younger and older neighbours to get involved in activities and socialise; and Love Your Neighbour focuses on one-to-one friendships between older and younger neighbours. The evaluation examines the outcomes for young and older neighbours, the strengths and weaknesses of the model, and highlights the challenges of evaluating community-based models. The evaluation found that overall, The Cares Family model is contributing to positive outcomes in four areas: reduced loneliness and isolation, particularly for older neighbours; improved understanding across the generations; a sense of belonging; and an increased connection to self.

Results 1 - 10 of 22

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News

Prevention in social care

Prevention in social care What it means, the policy context, role for commissioners and practitioners and the evidence base.

H4All wellbeing service

H4All wellbeing service Practice example about how H4All Wellbeing Service is using the Patient Activation Measure (PAM) tool

Moving Memory

Moving Memory Practice example about how the Moving Memory Dance Theatre Company is challenging perceived notions of age and ageing.

Chatty Cafe Scheme

Chatty Cafe Scheme Practice example about how the Chatty Cafe Scheme is helping to tackle loneliness by bringing people of all ages together

Oomph! Wellness

Oomph! Wellness Practice example about how Oomph! Wellness is supporting staff to get older adults active and combat growing levels of social isolation

LAUGH research project

LAUGH research project Practice example about a research project to develop highly personalised, playful objects for people with advanced dementia

KOMP

KOMP Practice example about how KOMP, designed by No Isolation is helping older people stay connected with their families
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