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Results for 'interpersonal relationships'

Results 1 - 10 of 13

Healing the generational divide: interim report on intergenerational connection

ALL-PARTY PARLIAMENTARY GROUP ON SOCIAL INTEGRATION
2019

Interim report of the All-Party Parliamentary Group (APPG) on Social Integration inquiry on intergenerational connection, which examines the current gap between older and younger people, and what can be done to bridge it. The report sets out a series of suggestions to bring people of all ages and backgrounds together under four main policy areas: community projects and initiatives; public services; housing and planning; and technology. The report highlights how intergenerational projects are particularly effective in achieving social integration, improving wellbeing and tackling loneliness. It also includes examples of successful initiatives It highlights the benefits of taking a whole-society approach, including all policy areas and involving national and local government, not-for-profit organisations, the private sector and academia. Specific recommendations include: for nurseries, schools and care homes to foster connections between the different generations who use their services and, where possible, to co-locate services on one site and the creation of a national volunteering scheme that encourages older people to volunteer in their communities when they retire.

North London Cares and South London Cares evaluation: final report

HITCHIN John, PETIE Olivia, NORRLANDER Amanda
2019

An evaluation Love Your Neighbour and Social Clubs, two programmes to reduce loneliness, improve intergenerational relationships and create a greater sense of community. The programmes, which aimed to bring together people of different generations to spend time together, were delivered across the London based charities North London Cares and South London Cares as part of The Cares Family’s model. The Social clubs programme brings together groups of younger and older neighbours to get involved in activities and socialise; and Love Your Neighbour focuses on one-to-one friendships between older and younger neighbours. The evaluation examines the outcomes for young and older neighbours, the strengths and weaknesses of the model, and highlights the challenges of evaluating community-based models. The evaluation found that overall, The Cares Family model is contributing to positive outcomes in four areas: reduced loneliness and isolation, particularly for older neighbours; improved understanding across the generations; a sense of belonging; and an increased connection to self.

Heritage and wellbeing. The impact of historic places and assets on community wellbeing: a scoping review

PENNINGTON Andy, et al
2019

A scoping review of evidence on the impact of heritage places, interventions, and assets – things like historic objects, monuments or buildings – to discover how they impact individual and community wellbeing. The primary focus of the review was on impacts of historic places and assets set within the ‘living environment’ of communities, but it also considers evidence from projects that used historic objects/artefacts, for example, in the care of people with dementia in care homes and other healthcare settings. The review looked at 75 papers and reports. It found higher and lower quality evidence that historic places, assets and associated activities and interventions can have a wide range of beneficial impacts on the physical, mental and social wellbeing of individuals and communities. These include increased life satisfaction and social connectivity for individuals and positive effects on community wellbeing such as social relationships, sense of belonging, pride of place, ownership and collective empowerment. It also identifies important gaps in the research, and highlights potential negative wellbeing impacts of participating in heritage-based interventions, or living in historic areas. Potential negative impacts of interventions appear to be related to how well the design and delivery of interventions considered the needs of specific individuals and groups.

Animal magic: the benefits of being around and caring for animals across care settings

CARE INSPECTORATE
2019

A collection of case studies which show how being around and caring for animals can benefit many children and adults using a range of care services. It shows how animals and pets can enhance the quality of life of children and adults by helping with relaxation, providing companionship, enhancing relationships, providing a positive focus to people's lives, and encouraging people to be active and making them feel happier. Contact with animals can also enhance relationships with their families, their friends and with care professionals - promoting a culture of kindness for people of all ages. The case studies include examples from very sheltered housing support, fostering services, homeless hostels, dementia care, and care homes. Each case study is annotated with details of relevant Scottish Health and Social Care Standards (Dignity and respect, Compassion, Be included, Responsive care and support, and Wellbeing) and Getting it Right for Every Child (GIRFEC) wellbeing indicators that apply to the example.

A feasibility study of facilitated reminiscence for people living with dementia: report

RYAN Assumpta, et al
2018

Reports on a feasibility study to investigate the effects of a home based, individual reminiscence intervention using an iPad app for people living with dementia and their family carers. The study design had three phases. Phase 1: A User Development Group comprising a paired sample of 6 people living with dementia and their family carers who worked with the research team to design and test the technology; Phase 2: Testing of the developed app with a paired sample of 30 people living with mild to moderate dementia and their family carers (n=60). Participants used the app for 12 weeks at home. Questionnaires which examined the impact of reminiscence on mutuality, wellbeing, quality of life and quality of the relationship between participants living with dementia and their family carers were collected at the beginning, middle and end points of the study. Health economics data were also collected to understand cost effectiveness. Phase 3: Individual interviews with a sample of participants (n=32) to explore their experience of the intervention. The results found that people living with dementia used the app independently and more frequently than their carers. They also showed an increase in the quality of caregiving relationships and emotional well‐being for people living with dementia. Although there was no significant change for carers over the course of the study, the intervention improved the caring relationship and was seen as an enjoyable way to care for themselves and their loved one.

Measuring national well-being: quality of life in the UK, 2018

JONES Rhian, RANDALL Chris
2018

Latest update of the Measuring National Well-being programme, summarising how people of different ages are faring in the UK today across a range of measures of national well-being - which include health, natural environment, personal finances and crime. It reports a broadly positive picture of life in the UK, with most indicators either improving or staying the same. The main challenges to wellbeing varied across age groups. For younger people - challenges include unemployment, loneliness, having someone to rely on and a lack of sense of belonging to their neighbourhood; for people in their early and middle years - less likely to be satisfied with their leisure time; and for older people - lower satisfaction with their health and lower engagement with an art or cultural activity.

Promising approaches to living well with dementia

JOPLING Kate
2017

This report provides a practical resource for individuals and organisations working in communities to support people living with dementia, and their carers to live well. It identifies interventions that are evidenced, cost effective and scalable, and which could be replicated by NHS Trusts, care providers and primary care services. The services highlighted include counselling for the newly diagnosed; encouraging people to get involved in arts and crafts activities; and helping people to reminisce through dance. It also proposes a framework to help understand these different approaches and the way they can be brought together in communities. This framework covers: Foundation services - which support people with dementia to access direct interventions; Direct interventions - to help support personal wellbeing, positive relationships, and active daily lives; Enabling services, which includes technology, transport and housing and care; and Structural factors - approaches in policy and practice which support effective development of appropriate services and systems., such as rights-based approaches and dementia friendly communities. Twenty five case studies are included to highlight the range of activity across the country. It makes recommendations for people with dementia and their carer, service providers and local authorities and health bodies involved with planning community responses to dementia.

The place of kindness: combating loneliness and building stronger communities

FERGUSON Zoe
2017

Reports on the second stage of a project to explore what can encourage kinder communities at a time when isolation and loneliness are recognised as major challenges. The project was carried out by the Carnegie UK Trust with the support of Joseph Rowntree Foundation, It worked with seven organisations in Scotland over a period of nine months, exploring the importance of places and opportunities to connect, and the intrinsic values that underpin interactions and relationships. This report identifies examples which show how kindness and everyday relationships can affect change and support the wellbeing of individuals and communities. It also identifies key factors that get in the way of encouraging kindness both in individuals and organisations. These include real and imagined rules relating to risk; funders and policy makers valuing the formal and organisational over the informal and individual; and modern definitions of professionalism and good leadership obscuring every day and intuitive human interactions. Examples of the work carried out by the seven organisations are included in the appendices.

Social isolation in mental health: a conceptual and methodological review: scoping review 14

WANG Jingyi, et al
2016

Social isolation and related terms such as loneliness have been increasingly discussed in the field of mental health. However, there is a lack of conceptual clarity and consistency of measurement of these terms and understanding of overlaps. This report provides definitions and brief explanations of relevant conceptual terms from the literature, and proposed a conceptual model covering different aspects of social isolation. Aspects of social isolation covered include loneliness, social support, social network, social capital, confiding relationships, and alienation. The conceptual model contains five domains to include all elements of current conceptualisations. These five domains are: social network: quantity; social network: structure; social network: quality; appraisal of relationships: emotional; appraisal of relationships: resources. It then proposes well established measures in the field of mental health for each conceptual domains of social isolation. The authors discuss the strengths and limitations of the approach. The developed model can help researchers and intervention developers to identify expected outcomes of interventions precisely and choose the most appropriate measures for use in mental health settings.

Kinder communities: the power of everyday relationships

FERGUSON Zoe
2016

This discussion paper explores the evidence on the impact of everyday relationships and kindness on individual and societal wellbeing, and community empowerment, and develops a theory of change. The paper sets out what maintaining connections and acting in kindness means and how these relate to concepts such as social capital, ‘random acts of kindness’, resilience, isolation and loneliness. Drawing on the evidence, it explains why kinder communities are important, what are the enablers and barriers, and what is happening currently to strengthen everyday relationships and kinder communities, focusing on community development, interface with public services, building connections, assets based approaches and individual psychology. The paper includes seven case studies providing examples of good practice.

Results 1 - 10 of 13

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News

Moving Memory

Moving Memory Practice example about how the Moving Memory Dance Theatre Company is challenging perceived notions of age and ageing.

Chatty Cafe Scheme

Chatty Cafe Scheme Practice example about how the Chatty Cafe Scheme is helping to tackle loneliness by bringing people of all ages together

Oomph! Wellness

Oomph! Wellness Practice example about how Oomph! Wellness is supporting staff to get older adults active and combat growing levels of social isolation

KOMP

KOMP Practice example about how KOMP, designed by No Isolation is helping older people stay connected with their families

LAUGH research project

LAUGH research project Practice example about a research project to develop highly personalised, playful objects for people with advanced dementia
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