Coronavirus guidance for social work and social care

#EXCLUDE#
#EXCLUDE#

Find prevention records by subject or service provider/commissioner name

  • Key to icons

    • Journal Prevention service example
    • Book Book
    • Digital media Digital media
    • Journal Journal article
    • Free resource Free resource

Results for 'intervention'

Results 1 - 10 of 204

Never too late: prevention in an ageing world

INTERNATIONAL LONGEVITY CENTRE UK
2020

This report explores how health care systems can better prevent ill health across people's lives, focusing on people interventions among those aged 50 and over. It presents analysis focussing on a small number of diseases where preventative interventions by healthcare systems could make a real difference to people’s health and wellbeing. These are cardiovascular, lung cancer, type 2 diabetes and HIV. It also considers the case of flu. It presents a snapshot of the potential burden and cost of these diseases, such as costs due to sick days, presenteeism and early retirement. It also provides brief overviews of preventative interventions, which have the potential to help people live healthier for longer. The analysis presented in the report shows that failure to invest in prevention will bring substantial social, health and economic costs. It argues that in order to follow through on commitments to prevention, governments need to improve access to preventative interventions to tackle growing health inequalities; encourage populations, professionals and policymakers to promote good health and prevent illness; and effectively utilise technology to deliver preventative interventions.

Effectiveness of multifactorial interventions in preventing falls among older adults in the community: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

LEE Seon Heui, YU Soyoung
2020

Background: Falls often cause unexpected injuries that older adults find difficult to recover from (e.g., hip and other major fractures, intracranial bleeding); therefore, fall prevention and interventions are of particular significance. Objectives: This study aimed to examine the effectiveness of multifactorial fall prevention interventions among community-dwelling older adults and compare subgroups that differed in terms of their degree of fall risk and the intensity and components of interventions. Methods: An exhaustive systematic literature search was undertaken using the following databases: Ovid-Medline, Ovid-Embase, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (Central). Two investigators independently extracted data and assessed the quality of the studies by examining the risk of bias. This study conducted a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials that had been published up to March 31st, 2019, using Review Manager. Results: Of 1,328 studies, 45 articles were relevant to this study. In total, 29 studies included participants in the high-risk group, 3 in the frail group, and 13 in the healthy older adult group. Additionally, 28 and 17 studies used active and referral multifactorial interventions, respectively. Multifactorial interventions included the following components: exercise, education, environmental modification, medication, mobility aids, and vision and psychological management. Multifactorial interventions significantly reduced fall rates in the high-risk (risk ratio 0.66; 95% confidence interval 0.52–0.84) and healthy groups (risk ratio 0.72; 95% confidence interval 0.58–0.89), when compared to the control group. Active multifactorial interventions (risk ratio 0.64; 95% confidence interval 0.51–0.80) and those featuring exercise (risk ratio 0.66; 95% confidence interval 0.54–0.80) and environmental modification also showed significantly reduced fall rates (risk ratio 0.65; 95% confidence interval 0.54–0.79) compared to usual care. Multifactorial interventions had a significantly lower number of people who experienced falls during the study period compared to usual care in the healthy group (risk ratio 0.77; 95% confidence interval 0.62–0.95). Active multifactorial interventions (risk ratio 0.73; 95% confidence interval 0.60–0.89) and those featuring exercise (risk ratio 0.79; 95% confidence interval 0.66–0.95) and environmental modification (risk ratio 0.80; 95% confidence interval 0.68–0.95) had a significantly lower number of people who experienced falls compared to those receiving usual care. Conclusions: Active multifactorial interventions had positive effects on fall rates and the number of people experiencing falls. Thus, healthcare workers, including nurses, should be involved in planning fall prevention programs so that older adults can be provided with optimal care; multifactorial interventions that include exercise and environmental modification are particularly effective in reducing falls.

Interventions to prevent or delay long-term nursing home placement for adults with impairments: a systematic review of reviews

DUAN-PORTER Wei, et al
2020

Background: With continued growth in the older adult population, US federal and state costs for long-term care services are projected to increase. Recent policy changes have shifted funding to home and community-based services (HCBS), but it remains unclear whether HCBS can prevent or delay long-term nursing home placement (NHP). Methods: This study searched MEDLINE (OVID), Sociological Abstracts, PsycINFO, CINAHL, and Embase (from inception through September 2018); and Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, Joanna Briggs Institute Database, AHRQ Evidence-based Practice Center, and VA Evidence Synthesis Program reports (from inception through November 2018) for English-language systematic reviews. This study also sought expert referrals. Eligible reviews addressed HCBS for community-dwelling adults with, or at risk of developing, physical and/or cognitive impairments. Two individuals rated quality (using modified AMSTAR 2) and abstracted review characteristics, including definition of NHP and interventions. From a prioritized subset of the highest-quality and most recent reviews, this study abstracted intervention effects and strength of evidence (as reported by review authors). Results: Of 47 eligible reviews, most focused on caregiver support (n = 10), respite care and adult day programs (n = 9), case management (n = 8), and preventive home visits (n = 6). Among 20 prioritized reviews, 12 exclusively included randomized controlled trials, while the rest also included observational studies. Prioritized reviews found no overall benefit or inconsistent effects for caregiver support (n = 2), respite care and adult day programs (n = 3), case management (n = 4), and preventive home visits (n = 2). For caregiver support, case management, and preventive home visits, some reviews highlighted that a few studies of higher-intensity models reduced NHP. Reviews on other interventions (n = 9) generally found a lack of evidence examining NHP. Discussion: Evidence indicated no benefit or inconsistent effects of HCBS in preventing or delaying NHP. Demonstration of substantial impacts on NHP may require longer-term studies of higher-intensity interventions that can be adapted for a variety of settings.

Economic evaluation of a falls prevention exercise program among people With Parkinson's disease

FARAG Inez, et al
2016

Objective: The aim of this study was to determine the cost‐effectiveness of a 6‐month minimally supervised exercise program for people with PD. Methods: An economic analysis was conducted alongside a randomized, controlled trial in which 231 people age 40 years and over with PD were randomized into a usual care control group or an exercise group. Cost‐effectiveness was estimated using incremental cost per fall prevented (using falls calendars) as the primary analysis and cost per extra person avoiding mobility deterioration (defined as an improvement or no change in the 12‐point Short Physical Performance Battery Score between baseline and 6 month). A cost‐utility analysis using the Short Form‐6D was also performed. Uncertainty was represented using cost‐effectiveness scatter plots and acceptability curves. Planned subgroup analyses for the low‐disease‐severity group were also undertaken. Results: All results are reported in Australian dollars ($A). The average cost of the intervention was $A1,010 per participant. Incremental cost‐effectiveness of the program relative to usual care was $A574 per fall prevented, $A9,570 per extra person avoiding mobility deterioration, and $A338,800 per quality‐adjusted life year gained. The intervention had an 80% probability of being cost‐effective, relative to the control, at a threshold of $A2,000 per fall prevented. Subgroup analyses for the low‐disease‐severity group indicate the program to be dominant, that is, less costly and more effective than usual care for all health outcomes. Conclusion: The exercise intervention appeared cost‐effective with regard to fall prevention in the whole sample and cost saving in the low disease severity group, when compared with usual care.

Efficacy and generalizability of falls prevention interventions in nursing homes: a systematic review and meta-analysis

GULKA Heidi J, et al
2020

Objectives: To determine the efficacy of fall intervention programs in nursing homes (NHs) and the generalizability of these interventions to people living with cognitive impairment and dementia. Design: Systematic review and meta-analysis. Setting and Participants: NH residents (n = 30,057) living in NHs defined as residential facilities that provide 24-hours-a-day surveillance, personal care, and some clinical care for persons who are typically aged ≥65 years with multiple complex chronic health conditions. Methods: Meta-analysis of falls prevention interventions on number of falls, fallers, and recurrent fallers. Results: Thirty-six studies met inclusion criteria for the systematic review. Overall, fall prevention interventions reduced the number of falls [risk ratio (RR) = 0.73, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.60-0.88], fallers (RR = 0.80, 95% CI = 0.72-0.89), and recurrent fallers (RR = 0.70, 95% CI = 0.60-0.81). Subanalyses revealed that single interventions have a significant effect on reducing fallers (RR = 0.78, 95% CI = 0.69-0.89) and recurrent fallers (RR = 0.60, 95% CI = 0.52-0.70), whereas multiple interventions reduce fallers (RR = 0.69, 95% CI = 0.39-0.97) and multifactorial interventions reduce number of falls (RR = 0.65, 95% CI = 0.45-0.94). Conclusions and Implications: Exercise as a single intervention reduced the number of fallers and recurrent fallers by 36% and 41%, respectively, in people living in NHs. Other effective interventions included staff education and multiple and multifactorial interventions. However, more research on exercise including people with cognitive impairment and dementia is needed to improve the generalizability of these interventions to the typical NH resident.

Regular doses of nature: the efficacy of green exercise interventions for mental wellbeing

ROGERSON Mike, et al
2020

This study investigated the efficacy of medium-term Green Exercise (GE; being physically active within a natural environment) interventions for improving wellbeing, by pooling data collected at the start and end of participants’ engagement with a range of GE interventions. Hypotheses were that (i) interventions would show good efficacy for improving wellbeing in the overall sample; (ii) compared to participants reporting ‘average to high’ wellbeing at the start of their project, participants with ‘low’ starting wellbeing would report greater improvements post-intervention; and (iii) improvements would significantly differ between age groups. The pooled dataset was categorized in line with UK norms (n = 318) and analyzed using a standardized meta-analysis approach. Effect size was large: g = 0.812 (95% CI [0.599, 1.025]), and differences in wellbeing changes associated with project duration, age or sex were not statistically significant. Compared to those reporting ‘average-high’ starting wellbeing, participants reporting ‘low’ starting wellbeing exhibited greater improvements (BCa 95% CI [−31.8, −26.5]), with 60.8% moving into the ‘average-high’ wellbeing category. GE can play an important role in facilitating wellbeing and can provide alternative pathways for health and social care practice. Public health commissioners should consider integrating such interventions for patients experiencing low wellbeing or associated comorbidities.

The effectiveness of community-based social innovations for healthy ageing in middle- and high-income countries: a systematic review

GHIGA Ioana, et al
2020

Objectives: Community-based social innovations (CBSIs) are one type of intervention that may help to address the complex needs of ageing populations globally. The aim of this research was to assess evidence for the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of CBSIs involving in such contexts. Methods: This study conducted a systematic review of CBSIs for healthy ageing in middle- and high-income countries, including any CBSI that aimed to empower people aged 50 and over by motivating them to take initiative for their own health and wellbeing. The protocol was registered with Prospero (CRD 42016051622). A comprehensive search was conducted in 15 academic databases and advanced search in Google. This study included published studies from 2000 onwards in any language. Exploratory meta-analysis was conducted for quantitative studies reporting similar outcomes, and qualitative studies were analysed using thematic analysis. Narrative synthesis was conducted. Searches yielded 13,262 unique hits, from which 44 papers met the inclusion criteria. Results: Most studies reported interventions having positive impacts on participants, such as reduced depression, though the majority of studies were classified as being at medium or high risk of bias. There was no evidence on costs or cost-effectiveness and very little reporting of outcomes at an organization or system level. CBSIs have the potential for positive impacts, but with nearly half of studies coming from high-income urban settings (particularly the United Kingdom and the United States of America), there is a lack of generalizability of these findings. Conclusions: This research highlights the need to improve reporting of CBSIs as complex interventions, and for improved conceptualization of these interventions to inform research and practice.

Reducing emergency hospital admissions: a population health complex intervention of an enhanced model of primary care and compassionate communities

ABEL Julian, et al
2018

Background: Reducing emergency admissions to hospital has been a cornerstone of healthcare policy. Little evidence exists to show that systematic interventions across a population have achieved this aim. The authors report the impact of a complex intervention over a 44-month period in Frome, Somerset, on unplanned admissions to hospital. Aim: To evaluate a population health complex intervention of an enhanced model of primary care and compassionate communities on population health improvement and reduction of emergency admissions to hospital. Design and setting: A cohort retrospective study of a complex intervention on all emergency admissions in Frome Medical Practice, Somerset, compared with the remainder of Somerset, from April 2013 to December 2017. Method: Patients were identified using broad criteria, including anyone giving cause for concern. Patient-centred goal setting and care planning combined with a compassionate community social approach was implemented broadly across the population of Frome. Results: There was a progressive reduction, by 7.9 cases per quarter (95% confidence interval [CI] = 2.8 to 13.1, P = 0.006), in unplanned hospital admissions across the whole population of Frome during the study period from April 2013 to December 2017, a decrease of 14.0%. At the same time, there was a 28.5% increase in admissions per quarter within Somerset, with a rise in the number of unplanned admissions of 236 per quarter (95% CI = 152 to 320, P<0.001). Conclusion The complex intervention in Frome was associated with highly significant reductions in unplanned admissions to hospital, with a decrease in healthcare costs across the whole population of Frome.

Perceptions of older people in Ireland and Australia about the use of technology to address falls prevention

MACKENZIE Lynette, CLIFFORD Amanda
2020

Falls are common events with serious consequences for older people. With an ageing population and increasing health-care costs, information and communication technologies (ICT) will have a potential role in future health-care delivery. However, research on technology acceptance in health care for older people is limited and its application to falls prevention is unknown. The aims of this study were to explore and describe the perceptions of community-dwelling Australian and Irish older people about their current use of technology, and the potential use of technology for falls prevention. Qualitative data were collected from three focus groups conducted in and around Limerick in Ireland, and three in the Sydney area, Australia. A total of 35 older people participated. Data were analysed using thematic analysis. Four themes emerged from the data: (a) perceptions of vulnerability to falls, (b) preferences for exercise interventions, (c) participation in and ownership of technology, and (d) perceptions about applications of technology for falls prevention. As the use of technology is an instrumental activity of daily living, health professionals need to assess the capacity of older people to adopt these technologies, and provide falls prevention interventions to accommodate the technology skills of older people. Some participants were reluctant to embrace technology and barriers to the effective use of technology to assist in preventing falls may conflict with future health service trends.

Connecting communities: a strategy for tackling loneliness and social isolation

WALES. Welsh Government
2020

The young person's and community version of the Welsh Government strategy to tackle loneliness and social isolation. It outlines the Government's plan to tackle loneliness and social isolation and build a more connected society. It covers four priority areas: providing more opportunities for people to connect; providing good quality transport, community spaces and internet that help people connect; cohesive and supportive communities; and raising awareness of loneliness and social isolation. The strategy will be supported by funding over three years to support community-based organisations to deliver and test innovative approaches to tackling loneliness and social isolation.

Results 1 - 10 of 204

#EXCLUDE#
News

Moving Memory

Moving Memory Practice example about how the Moving Memory Dance Theatre Company is challenging perceived notions of age and ageing.

Chatty Cafe Scheme

Chatty Cafe Scheme Practice example about how the Chatty Cafe Scheme is helping to tackle loneliness by bringing people of all ages together

Oomph! Wellness

Oomph! Wellness Practice example about how Oomph! Wellness is supporting staff to get older adults active and combat growing levels of social isolation

KOMP

KOMP Practice example about how KOMP, designed by No Isolation is helping older people stay connected with their families

LAUGH research project

LAUGH research project Practice example about a research project to develop highly personalised, playful objects for people with advanced dementia
View more: News
Related SCIE content
Related external content
Visit Social Care Online, the UK’s largest database of information and research on all aspects of social care and social work.
SEARCH NOW
Submit prevention service example
SUBMIT
What do you think about SCIE's work?
FEEDBACK
#EXCLUDE#
#EXCLUDE#