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Results for 'intervention'

Results 1 - 10 of 221

Activities outside of the care setting for people with dementia: a systematic review

D'CUNHA Nathan Martin, et al
2020

Objectives To summarise the evidence from interventions investigating the effects of out of care setting activities on people with dementia living in residential aged care. Design A systematic review. Methods: A systematic search of electronic databases (PubMed, PsycINFO, Scopus, Web of Science and the Cochrane Library) was performed to identify intervention trials published from journal inception to January 2020. Controlled trials, or quasi-experimental trials, which measured pre-intervention, post-intervention or during-intervention outcomes, where the participants were required to leave the care setting to participate in an intervention, were eligible for inclusion. Quality appraisal of the studies was performed following the Cochrane Collaboration’s Risk of Bias or Newcastle-Ottawa Scale tools. Results: Of the 4155 articles screened, 11 articles met the inclusion criteria from 9 different studies. The number of participants in the studies ranged from 6 to 70 people living with dementia and lasted for 3 weeks up to 5 months. The interventions were aquatic exercise, wheelchair cycling, art gallery discussion groups, an intergenerational mentorship programme, horse riding, walking and outdoor gardening. Overall, the studies indicated preliminary evidence of psychological (n=7), physical (n=4) and physiological (n=1) benefits, and all interventions were feasible to conduct away from the aged care facilities. However, the low number of participants in the included studies (n=177), the absence of a control group in all but three studies, and potential for selection bias, limits the generalisability of the findings. Conclusions: Activities outside of the residential aged care setting have the potential to be effective at providing a range of benefits for people living with dementia. Higher quality studies are required to encourage care providers to implement these type of activities in dementia care settings.

Ageing Better Isle of Wight: final evaluation report

HARFLETT Naomi
2020

Final evaluation report for Ageing Better Isle of Wight – a five-year Programme funded by the National Lottery Community Fund that aimed to make the Isle of Wight a great place to grow older, encourage better relations between generations, and tackle social isolation and loneliness. Over five years of delivery the AB IOW Programme has had a significant impact across a number of areas and generated substantial learning. 16,836 older people participated in 16 projects across all areas of the Island. These included: care navigators; community navigators; alternative transport; Alzheimer cafe; one-to-one creative sessions for people in residential care; care for carers; digital inclusion; education; men in shed; employment support; mental health peer support; good neighbour scheme; older-preneurs; an online directory of local events and services; singing groups. In total, 11 organisations were directly involved in delivery of the Programme and organisations across the voluntary, public and private sectors Island wide were affected by the impact of the work of the projects. Key areas of impact included: reducing social isolation – for an estimated two thirds of participants levels of social isolation were either reduced or maintained; improving wellbeing – there was a statistically significant increase in the mean wellbeing scores of national evaluation questionnaire respondents, and 50% of respondents participating in AB IOW projects experienced an improvement in wellbeing; value for money – analysis of the costs and the benefits of the projects found that in part due to good use of volunteers and existing community facilities, the projects delivered support, advice and interventions at a low unit cost per participant; becoming an Age Friendly Island – AB IOW has had a notable impact on the voluntary, public and private sectors on the IOW.

Evaluation of Ageing Better Isle of Wight

NATIONAL DEVELOPMENT TEAM FOR INCLUSION
2020

Final evaluation report for Ageing Better Isle of Wight – a five-year Programme funded by the National Lottery Community Fund that aimed to make the Isle of Wight a great place to grow older, encourage better relations between generations, and tackle social isolation and loneliness. Over five years of delivery the AB IOW Programme has had a significant impact across a number of areas and generated substantial learning. 16,836 older people participated in 16 projects across all areas of the Island. These included: care navigators; community navigators; alternative transport; Alzheimer cafe; one-to-one creative sessions for people in residential care; care for carers; digital inclusion; education; men in shed; employment support; mental health peer support; good neighbour scheme; older-preneurs; an online directory of local events and services; singing groups. In total, 11 organisations were directly involved in delivery of the Programme and organisations across the voluntary, public and private sectors Island wide were affected by the impact of the work of the projects. Key areas of impact included: reducing social isolation – for an estimated two thirds of participants levels of social isolation were either reduced or maintained; improving wellbeing – there was a statistically significant increase in the mean wellbeing scores of national evaluation questionnaire respondents, and 50% of respondents participating in AB IOW projects experienced an improvement in wellbeing; value for money – analysis of the costs and the benefits of the projects found that in part due to good use of volunteers and existing community facilities, the projects delivered support, advice and interventions at a low unit cost per participant; becoming an Age Friendly Island – AB IOW has had a notable impact on the voluntary, public and private sectors on the IOW.

Evidence summary for policy: the role of arts in improving health & wellbeing: report to the Department for Digital, Culture, Media & Sport

FANCOURT Daisy, WARRAN Katey, AUGHTERSON Henry
2020

This report synthesised the findings from over 3,500 studies on the role of the arts in the prevention of ill health, promotion of health, and management and treatment of illness across the lifespan. The reviewed evidence included study designs such as randomized controlled studies, nationally-representative longitudinal cohort studies, communitywide ethnographies, cross-sectional surveys, laboratory experiments, and case studies. The review focuses on how arts engagement can impact on 1) social outcomes, 2) youth development and 3) the prevention of mental and physical illness. It also considers how social prescribing programmes that have used arts interventions can impact on the above three outcomes. The evidence summary assesses the type and quality of evidence available for each outcome. The findings show strong evidence for the following outcomes, suggesting that this evidence can be trusted to guide policy: the use of music to support infant social development; the use of book reading to support child social development; the use of music or reading for speech and language development amongst infants and children; the use of the arts to support aspects of social cohesion; the use of the arts to improve wellbeing (i.e. positive psychological factors) in adults; and the use of the arts to reduce physical decline in older age. In relation to the use of social prescribing (SP), the evidence is promising for wellbeing and social cohesion but weak for physical health and social inequalities, and non-existent for social development, the prevention of mental illness, and cognition. Nevertheless, economic evaluations suggest there may be benefits including returns on investment and social returns on investment from implementing arts-based SP.

Social prescribing for people with mental health needs living in disadvantaged communities: the Life Rooms model

HASSAN Shaima M., et al
2020

Background: People live socially complex lives and have different health care needs influenced by socio-economic factors such as deprivation, unemployment, and poor housing. Lack of access to community based social care results in people seeking social support from health care services. This study explores the Life Rooms as a social prescribing model addressing the social determinants of mental health by providing support and access to resources in a local community setting. With an aim to identify key elements that contribute toward enhancing the effectiveness of the Life Rooms social prescribing approach. Methods: Data were obtained through six semi-structured focus groups with mental health service users from two locations in the North West of the UK. Postcode data was collected to generate an Index for Multiple Deprivation (IMD) score, to understand their socio-economic background. Data were analysed using thematic analysis. Results: A total of 18 participants took part in the study. The majority of participants came from disadvantaged backgrounds; 14 participants measuring 3 and below in terms of overall IMD scores and 9 participants belonged to the poorest decile (IMD score = 1). Participants reported on different elements of the Life Rooms which they found as an effective approach to care. Four main themes emerged from the data: 1) social belonging: being able to just ‘be’ 2) resourceful and accessible; 3) social inclusion and connectedness; and 4) moving forward: self-development and independence. Conclusion: Findings support the need and benefit social prescribing to improve mental health wellbeing and reduce the burden of mental illness.

Rolling out social prescribing: understanding the experience of the voluntary, community and social enterprise sector

COLE Aimie, JONES Dan, JOPLING Kate
2020

This report sets out the findings of research to explore the perspectives and experiences of the voluntary, community and social enterprise (VCSE) sector in relation to the NHS rollout of social prescribing. The research heard from over 300 people through a series of interviews, workshops and online engagements between December 2019 and June 2020. NHS England has made a significant commitment to ensure that social prescribing is available across the country, including the recruitment of over 1,000 specialist link workers during 2020/21. The study explored key components of the programme and its implications, including: the new social prescribing link workers; measurement; funding; inequality; and coordination, collaboration and partnership. The findings indicate that the VCSE sector is supportive of social prescribing and keen to work constructively with the health system. However, in many places the pace of the rollout has had a destabilising effect by cutting across existing schemes, or failing to build on and invest in the work already done by the sector. Respondents were committed to measurement and using performance data for management and improvement but there are concerns about the use of appropriate measures, which capture the social as well as clinical outcomes of social prescribing. Funding was by far the biggest concern for all those who took part, and specifically in relation to funding for services and activities provided by the VCSE sector. In addition, without appropriate investment, social prescribing could exacerbate inequality in a range of ways – generalist link workers may lack the skills or resources to engage effectively with excluded individuals and communities while poorer communities tend to have lower levels of formal VCSE activity. The findings emphasise that effective social prescribing depends on relationships, both at individual and organisational level – VCSE experiences of the rollout have been most positive in places where relationships were already established.

Promising approaches revisited: effective action on loneliness in later life

JOPLING Kate
2020

Drawing on the expertise and experience of leading figures in the field, academic literature and other evidence, this report presents an update to an earlier framework for loneliness interventions published in 2015. The framework helps to make sense of the different ways we can address loneliness, and explains how these approaches fit together to create an effective community response. The guide offers examples of these approaches in action so that organisations can find inspiration from others. The new guide learns the lessons of the last five years – as well as the impact of the pandemic and how organisations tackling loneliness have adapted. Its key message is that to tackle loneliness, different types of support need to be in place. People need to have the infrastructure to engage in social life, whether that is about digital, transport or a built environment that supports social life. Finally, there are direct ways of reducing loneliness whether that is one-to-one or in groups, or psychological support. A key change to the framework is the addition of the built environment as part of the ‘gateway infrastructure’ that helps tackle loneliness, recognising the role shops, cafes and pubs play as places to meet.

Connecting communities: a qualitative investigation of the challenges in delivering a national social prescribing service to reduce loneliness

HOLDING Eleanor, et al
2020

Loneliness is a global public health concern linked to a range of negative health outcomes (Cacioppo & Cacioppo, 2018. The Lancet. 391(10119), 426). Internationally, this has led to the development of a number of interventions, but these are rarely implemented or evaluated on a large scale. This paper is one of the first of its kind to describe elements of an evaluation of a large‐scale national social prescribing scheme to reduce loneliness, deploying individual link workers to signpost people to community activities. Reporting on findings from interviews with staff (n = 25 of which 6 were repeat interviews) and volunteers (n = 9) between October 2017 and December 2018 in localities across the United Kingdom. We reflect on the complexities of the link worker role, the challenges of service delivery and the importance of community infrastructure. There was evidence that highly skilled link workers who had developed positive relationships with providers and service‐users were key to the success of the intervention. As well as providing an effective liaison and signposting function, successful link workers tailored the national programme to local need to proactively address specific gaps in existing service provision. For social prescribing services to be successful and sustainable, commissioners must consider additional funding of community infrastructure.

Evolving an evidence‐based model for homelessness prevention

OUDSHOORN Abe, et al
2020

While some progress has been made in addressing chronic homelessness through supportive models, a comprehensive solution for housing loss must include prevention. The purpose of this article is twofold: to conduct a review of the literature on the domains of the Framework for Homelessness Prevention; and to use literature on the concept of quaternary prevention, preventing the harms of service provision, to theorise an additional domain. The Framework for Homelessness Prevention draws upon theory from public health exploring primary, secondary and tertiary prevention, and also integrates primordial prevention. This leads to a typology of homelessness prevention that incorporates the following five domains: (a) Structural prevention; (b) Systems prevention; (c) Early intervention; (d) Eviction prevention; and (e) Housing stability. By systematically reviewing the literature we build out the evidence‐base supporting these domains. The team used research databases, internet searches and retrospective reference list reviews to identify high‐quality journal articles on prevention, which were then sorted by level of prevention. Through this process, we evolved our thinking on the Framework in considering that quaternary prevention was not initially included. Therefore, we explored the literature related to quaternary prevention in the context of homelessness and offer a sixth domain for the Framework: Empowerment. Ultimately, a comprehensive Framework for Homelessness Prevention will support communities and governments to more effectively prevent homelessness through upstream approaches.

Loneliness and social isolation interventions for older adults: a scoping review of reviews

FAKOYA Olujoke A., MCCORRY Noleen K., DONNELLY Michael
2020

Background: Loneliness and social isolation are growing public health concerns in our ageing society. Whilst these experiences occur across the life span, 50% of individuals aged over 60 are at risk of social isolation and one-third will experience some degree of loneliness later in life. The aim of this scoping review was to describe the range of interventions to reduce loneliness and social isolation among older adults that have been evaluated; in terms of intervention conceptualisation, categorisation, and components. Methods: Three electronic databases (CINAHL, Embase and Medline) were systematically searched for relevant published reviews of interventions for loneliness and social isolation. Inclusion criteria were: review of any type, published in English, a target population of older people and reported data on the categorisation of loneliness and/or social isolation interventions. Data extracted included: categories of interventions and the reasoning underpinning this categorisation. The methodology framework proposed by Arskey and O’Malley and further developed by Levac, et al. was used to guide the scoping review process. Results: A total of 33 reviews met the inclusion criteria, evaluating a range of interventions targeted at older people residing in the community or institutionalised settings. Authors of reviews included in this paper often used the same terms to categorise different intervention components and many did not provide a clear definition of these terms. There were inconsistent meanings attributed to intervention characteristics. Overall, interventions were commonly categorised on the basis of: 1) group or one-to-one delivery mode, 2) the goal of the intervention, and 3) the intervention type. Several authors replicated the categorisation system used in previous reviews. Conclusion: Many interventions have been developed to combat loneliness and social isolation among older people. The individuality of the experience of loneliness and isolation may cause difficulty in the delivery of standardised interventions. There is no one-size-fits-all approach to addressing loneliness or social isolation, and hence the need to tailor interventions to suit the needs of individuals, specific groups or the degree of loneliness experienced. Therefore, future research should be aimed at discerning what intervention works for whom, in what particular context and how.

Results 1 - 10 of 221

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Moving Memory

Moving Memory Practice example about how the Moving Memory Dance Theatre Company is challenging perceived notions of age and ageing.

Chatty Cafe Scheme

Chatty Cafe Scheme Practice example about how the Chatty Cafe Scheme is helping to tackle loneliness by bringing people of all ages together

Oomph! Wellness

Oomph! Wellness Practice example about how Oomph! Wellness is supporting staff to get older adults active and combat growing levels of social isolation

KOMP

KOMP Practice example about how KOMP, designed by No Isolation is helping older people stay connected with their families

LAUGH research project

LAUGH research project Practice example about a research project to develop highly personalised, playful objects for people with advanced dementia
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