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Results for 'intervention'

Results 81 - 90 of 106

Only the lonely: a randomized controlled trial of a volunteer visiting programme for older people experiencing loneliness

LAWLOR Brian, et al
2015

Loneliness is a significant problem among older people living in Ireland. The negative effects of loneliness on physical and emotional health are well documented in the literature. This study was established in the context of a dearth of effective interventions to alleviate loneliness. A peer visiting intervention for community dwelling older adults experiencing loneliness was designed and subjected to the rigour of a randomised controlled trial. It consisted of ten home visits to the intervention participants from a volunteer, themselves an older person. The volunteer built up a rapport with the participant and encouraged them to identify a social connection they wished to establish. Several participants made new social connections outside their home while most continued to receive visits from their volunteer following the end of the study period. The main study finding was very positive. The primary outcome, loneliness, decreased in the intervention group at one month and three month follow up. Potential benefits for the volunteers were also identified, in particular a decrease in loneliness. Both participants and volunteers reported that they enjoyed the intervention. The intervention is low cost and could be incorporated into existing support services or non-government organisations caring for community dwelling older adults. It is a potentially scalable model to deal with the major societal challenge of loneliness.

Evaluation of Redcar and Cleveland Community Agents Project: outputs and outcomes summary report

WATSON Pat, SHUCKSMITH Janet
2015

The Community Agents Project, a programme jointly funded through health and adult social care services, is an innovative approach to meeting the social needs of the elderly and vulnerable population. Community agents act as a one-stop shop, signposting people to the appropriate service that meets their needs. This could be an organisation or voluntary group that can help with shopping, arrange transport to the GP surgery or hospital appointments, help to complete forms, offer encouragement to maintain a care plan, organise a befriender, accompany to a local social activity or signposting to other agencies. The project has received a total of 486 referrals across the borough of Redcar & Cleveland for the period September 2014-September 2015, generating positive outcomes in the following areas: maintaining independence; faster discharge from hospital; reducing admissions to hospital; reducing isolation; improved financial status; appropriate use of health and social services; cost saving; and increases in community capacity. The report estimates a social return on investment of £3.29 for every £1 invested in the Community Agents Project.

People, places, possibilities: progress on Local Area Coordination in England and Wales

BROAD Ralph
2015

This report outlines the progress made in implementing Local Area Coordination in England and Wales between 2012 and 2015. This intervention aims to reduce demand for health and social care by intentionally working to support individuals, families, carers and communities to stay strong, diverting people from formal services wherever possible through sustainable, local, flexible individual and community solutions. The report, which include examples of implementation, stories of success and data describing the improved outcomes and efficiency, suggests that early development sites are demonstrating significant improvements in the quality of people's lives while also providing savings to public services. The stories in this report illustrate how Local Area Coordination: builds individual, family and community resilience; reduces demand for services; reduces isolation and loneliness; increases choice, control and contribution; builds inclusion and citizenship; is a catalyst for reform; and simplifies the system for local people. The report concludes with the suggestion that the strength of Local Area Coordination rests in its ability to act as a single, local, accessible point of contact - simplifying the system, reducing duplication and focusing on strength, inclusion, leadership and citizenship for all.

Co-producing approaches to the management of dementia through social prescribing

BAKER Keith, IRVING Adele
2016

A promising approach to the management of dementia is ‘social prescribing’. Social prescribing is a form of ‘co-production’ that involves linking patients with non-clinical activities, typically delivered by voluntary and community groups, in an effort to improve their sense of well-being. The success of social prescribing depends upon the ability of boundary-spanning individuals within service delivery organizations to develop referral pathways and collaborative relationships through ‘networks’. This article examines the operation of a pilot social prescribing programme in the North East of England, targeted at older people with early onset dementia and depression, at risk of social isolation. It is argued that the scheme was not sustained, in part, because the institutional logics that governed the actions of key boundary-spanning individuals militated against the collaboration necessary to support co-production.

Living a normal life: supporting the development of dementia friendly communities

HENWOOD Melanie
2015

An evaluation of a Skills for Care funded a programme of 12 pilot projects, across 11 organisations, for 12 months in 2013/14 designed to support the development of dementia friendly communities (DFCs), by improving community understanding and awareness of dementia and supporting people living with dementia and their carers to participate in their communities. Section 1 of the report provides an introduction both to the underlying objectives of the programme, and to the participating pilot sites. Section 2 presents an overview of the cross-cutting themes and issues identified across the sites, including motivation and engagement, working with the wider community, intergenerational aspects, engaging with GPs and the NHS, and impact and outcomes. The methodology for the evaluation included analysis of written reports; and one to one semi-structured interviews with project leads. The report highlights the importance of motivation and personal engagement as driving forces while suggesting that most projects encountered difficulties – to a greater or lesser extent – in trying to work with the wider community in developing awareness and understanding of dementia. A few of the projects were addressing intergenerational dimensions of dementia awareness and were working with schools, or were planning to develop such work. In working with a range of local partners many projects were deliberately engaging with the NHS in general and with GPs in particular to increase diagnosis rates. The report concludes that equipping people with the skills and understanding to respond to the needs of people with dementia has great potential to bring about transformational change and to enable genuine social inclusion.

Measuring your impact on loneliness in later life

CAMPAIGN TO END LONELINESS
2015

This guidance offers information and advice on choosing and using a scale to measure the impact of services and interventions on loneliness in older age. A scale is simply a way of numerically measuring an opinion or emotion, and is one way to gather evidence about the effectiveness of a service. Using a scale enables service providers to ask about loneliness in a structured way – and produces numbers that can help illustrate how much of a difference they are making. In this guidance four different scales are described and evaluated and their strengths and limitations discussed. These are: the Campaign to End Loneliness Measurement Tool; the De Jong Gierveld Loneliness Scale; the UCLA Loneliness Scale; and the single-item ‘scale’. The paper explains how to use a chosen scale, focusing on sampling for a survey, gaining informed consent, reducing bias, data collection, asking open, follow-up questions, and keeping personal information confidential.

Occupational therapy and physical activity interventions to promote the mental health wellbeing of older people in primary care and residential care: evidence update March 2015

NATIONAL INSTITUTE FOR HEALTH AND CARE EXCELLENCE
2015

Summarises selected new evidence published since the original literature search was conducted for the NICE guidance 16 Occupational therapy and physical activity interventions to promote the mental health wellbeing of older people in primary care and residential care (2008). A search was conducted for new evidence from 1 June 2011 to 28 July 2014 and a total of 8,973 pieces of evidence were initially identified. The 21 most relevant references underwent a critical appraisal process and then were reviewed by an Evidence Update Advisory Group, which advised on the final list of 6 items selected for the Evidence Update. The update provides detailed commentaries on the new evidence focussing on the following themes: occupational interventions, physical activity, walking schemes, and training. It also highlights evidence uncertainties identified.

Hidden citizens: how can we identify the most lonely older adults?

GOODMAN Anna, SWIFT Hannah J., ADAMS Adrian
2015

This report summarises the findings from the Hidden Citizens project, providing insights regarding the pathways into and out of loneliness and examples of how interventions and services identify the loneliest older adults. The project was conducted in two parts. First, a meta-review was conducted to explore the features of loneliness, its underlying mechanisms and how intervention programs identify and recruit their participants. The findings of the meta-review informed the second part of the project in which a number of interviews and focus groups with older people, service commissioners, service organisation CEO’s, managers and practitioners were conducted. This report also contains specific recommendations for policy makers, service providers and service commissioners on how to improve services and service provision, and identifies avenues for future research to explore. It shows that the experience of loneliness is likely to be a culmination of one or more factors, or set of circumstances, which include: membership of different social groups; personality; psychological response; environmental factors; life events, traumas and transitions; and personal circumstances. The report sets out recommendations considering ways to identify people experiencing loneliness across three different levels: the population, organisational and individual level.

Promising approaches: to reducing loneliness and isolation in later life

JOPLING Kate
2015

This report raises concerns that loneliness and social isolation among older people is becoming a serious public health issue. It draws on the views of experts and research evidence to set out a new framework for understanding and tackling loneliness in older people. The approach is based around three key challenges: reaching individuals; understanding the specific circumstances of an individual's loneliness; and supporting individuals to take up services that would help. Sections of the report cover: the foundation services (reaching, understanding and supporting individuals); the types of intervention that are most likely to meet older people's need for social contact; how technology and transport can facilitate social connection; and 'structural enablers' focusing on how services are delivered (i.e., at neighbourhood level, community development, volunteering, and age positive approaches). It also highlights areas where a greater understanding of how to address loneliness within the older community is needed: within care settings; in black and minority ethnic groups; and with lesbian, gay, bisexual and trans older people. Case studies are used throughout to demonstrate the variety of solutions needed to address a very personal and individual problem. Includes specific recommendations for service providers, commissioners and those involved with search.

Preventing Crisis for Carers: a Princess Royal Trust for Carers' programme funded by the Moffat Charitable Trust: final evaluation report

KELLY Timothy B., et al
2010

An independent evaluation of the Crisis Prevention Programme, which comprised four individual pilot projects operating in four NHS board areas in Scotland and aimed to get support and advice for carers at an early stage, offer them a carer's assessment, reduce the pressure on their health, get them involved in discharge planning and train health and social care professionals in carer awareness. The evaluation found that the programme resulted in many improvements in hospitals, including: professionals were more likely to identify carers at an early stage and put support for them in place at an earlier stage; there were changes to ways of working which benefited carers; carers reported feeling that professionals had more recognition of their expertise in caring and understood their needs as a carer; carers felt more able to have a say in shaping the services they, or the person they cared for, received; and carers were provided with more information, such as being told of their right to a carer's assessment. The evaluation recommended that funding for carer support workers in hospitals continues and that carer awareness training should be mandatory for all healthcare professionals.

Results 81 - 90 of 106

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LAUGH research project New practice example about a research project to develop highly personalised, playful objects for people with advanced dementia
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