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Results for 'joint working'

Results 1 - 10 of 30

Loneliness, social isolation and COVID-19: practical advice

LOCAL GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION, ASSOCIATION OF DIRECTORS OF PUBLIC HEALTH
2020

This briefing provides advice for Directors of Public Health and those leading the response to loneliness and social isolation issues arising from the COVID-19 pandemic. The advice highlights the importance in intervening early to tackle loneliness and social isolation to prevent more costly health and care needs from developing, as well as helping community resilience and recovery. This can only be done at the local level through partnerships, with councils playing a role, as they own most of the assets where community action could or should take place, such as parks, libraries and schools. A table summarises the main risk factors of loneliness and social isolation, including those specific to COVID-19. It then briefly sets out councils’ role in working with partners and using community assets to address and help prevent loneliness and social isolation; looks at the steps councils were taking prior to the pandemic; and the changes that may be needed as a result of COVID-19 and opportunities to embed positive changes, such as greater awareness about the impact of personal behaviours on mental wellbeing.

Community-centred public health: taking a whole system approach. Briefing of research findings

PUBLIC HEALTH ENGLAND
2020

A summary of research findings into current practice on approaches to community-centred public health, which are important to reducing health inequalities. Community-centred approaches mobilise assets within communities, encourage equity and social connectedness and increase people’s control over their health and lives. The briefing summarises the key elements, core values and principles that are needed to make a shift to whole system approaches to community-centred public health. It provides information on scaling approaches, involving, strengthening and sustaining approaches. The research briefing is one of a suite of resources to help local authority, NHS and voluntary and community sector (VCS) decision makers to implement and embed community-centred approaches to health and wellbeing at scale. Accompanying resources include a slide-deck presentation of main findings, practice examples and a list of alternative whole system frameworks.

'The billion dollar question': embedding prevention in older people's services: 10 'high impact' changes

ALLEN Kerry, GLASBY Jon
2010

There is a need to invest more fully and strategically in both prevention and rehabilitation for older people, to help them stay healthier, more independent and more socially included for longer and to recover these capacities as fully as possible when they do require hospital treatment. While there is growing recognition that only a more preventative agenda will be sufficient to respond to current and future pressures, there is much less clarity about how to do this in practice. This paper seeks to identify the most promising ‘10 high impact changes’ with regards to prevention in older people’s services. The paper draws on two main sources. The first is an EU review of prevention and long-term care in older people’s services across 14 European counties known as Interlinks. The second key source is a recent review of the social and economic benefits of adult social care, commissioned by the Department of Health and Downing Street. This paper identifies and reviews the following 10 prevention strategies: promoting healthy lifestyles; vaccination; screening; falls prevention; housing adaptations and practical support; telecare and technology; intermediate care; reablement; partnership working; and personalisation.

Reaching out: guide to helping principal and local councils tackle loneliness

LOCAL GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF LOCAL COUNCILS
2019

A practical guide to help principal authorities and local councils to work together to tackle loneliness. The guide outlines the current loneliness policy context and uses a range of case studies to demonstrate effective models working in practice. It highlights four ways in which loneliness can be tackled at a local level: finding ways to reach and understand the needs of those experiencing loneliness; providing services that directly improve the number and quality of relationships that people have; providing support such as transport and technology to help sustain connections; and providing the right environment by creating the right structures and conditions locally to support those affected by, or at risk of, loneliness. Case studies include schemes to tackle loneliness and isolation in rural communities; older people's lunch clubs; supporting socially isolated adults and using tablet computers and video conferencing; and a model of Enhanced Primary Care. The guide includes useful check lists, advice on how to measure and evaluate outputs, and links to additional resources.

Managing better: a critical prevention study

CARE AND REPAIR CYMRU
2018

A case study of Bridgend County Care and Repair's Managing Better service. The service is a three year programme funded by the Welsh Government, which has been co-produced by Care & Repair Cymru, RNIB Cymru and Action on Hearing Loss Cymru. The report shows how Managing Better is working across primary, secondary, and social care, to develop interventions and prevent avoidable pressures on public services. The service has a focus on increasing independence, reducing dependency and improving personal resilience. Individual case studies are included which show how Managing Better has operated in Bridgend and that by effectively targeting interventions service users' quality of life can be much improved and pressure on public services can be reduced. The case studies include services for patients moving from hospital to home patients, and helping people with visual impairment or hearing impairment to live independently at home. It is estimated that every £1 invested in Managing Better yields a £4 saving in other services.

Managing Better good practice guide

CARE AND REPAIR CYMRU
2018

This guide aims to inform good practice when supporting older people to live independently at home, working with them to ensure their homes are safe, warm and accessible. It highlights partnership working between Care & Repair Cymru, RNIB Cymru and Action on Hearing Loss Cymru to develop an initiative providing support to older people with sensory loss or who are vulnerable in other ways, helping them to retain their independence and remain living in their own homes, with an emphasis on joint working across health, social care and the third sector. The guide includes a number of individual case studies and highlights good practice examples from the Managing Better service to provide a resource for all Care and Repair caseworkers

Dementia-friendly Brent: a model of community

TILKI Mary
2018

Report on the London borough of Brent's dynamic social movement helping to make the borough dementia friendly. Community Action on Dementia Brent (CADBrent) is a dynamic social movement that aims to make the London borough dementia friendly, accessible and inclusive of black and minority ethnic (BME) communities. Much has been achieved since the movement began five years ago. Some of the schemes discussed in the article include: Dementia peer support project; dementia friendly Mapesbury; The De-Cafe - memory cafe; Whole street of support; The Shed and Parnerships in Innovative Education.

Housing adaptations

AUDITOR GENERAL FOR WALES
2018

This report assesses whether organisations with responsibilities for delivering housing adaptations in Wales - which include local authorities, housing associations and Care and Repair agencies - have an effective approach that delivers value for money. It finds that the current system needs to change in order to meet the needs of older and disabled people. The review involved fieldwork at five local authorities and four housing associations, a survey of people who had received adaptations; and an analysis of data and expenditure on current services. It reports that although users express high levels of satisfaction with housing adaptations, the system is complex, reactive and results in people with similar needs often receiving different standards of service because of where they live and who is providing the service. Although public bodies are aware of the benefits of adaptations in supporting independence, ineffective partnership working results in missed opportunities to address needs and avoid and reduce demand and costs in health and social care services. The report makes nine recommendations for improvement, including: for the Welsh Government to set a minimum standard for adaptation work, so people can receive the same standard wherever they live; for local authorities to work more closely with partner agencies who deliver adaptations and streamline the application and delivery processes; and the provision of more accessible versions of information to the public.

Commissioning community development for health: a concise handbook

CHANAN Gabriel, FISHER Brian
2018

A practical guide to help Clinical Commissioning Groups (CCGs), sustainability and transformation partnerships (STPs) and local authorities to commission community development to support health and wellbeing. The guide looks at the role of community development in health and health policy, explains the main features of community development and the role community-based approaches can play in improving services. It includes a seven step framework for building community-led partnerships with local agencies and suggests key performance indicators that can be used to evaluate progress. It also provides a model contract for provision of the community development project and identifies the skill set for community development leaders and staff. The handbook is tailored to current policy in England, but the key principles have wider relevance.

Care and Health Improvement programme: efficiency project

LOCAL GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION
2018

This report provides practice examples from ten councils who took part in the Care and Health Improvement Programme during 2016/17. It describes the innovative approaches they took to achieve greater efficiencies from their adult social care budgets and draws conclusions as to what other councils might learn from them. The examples cover three main areas: managing demand for social care by offering residents a different type of service; more effectively using the capacity in communities to help find new care solutions; and working closer with partners in the NHS to reduce pressures in the care and health system. They highlight the importance of councils dealing with people effectively at their first point of contact; the benefits of using strength-based approaches; that developing social enterprises can be a cost effective way of meeting demand and reducing shortage of supply; and the potential of collaboration between councils to reduce costs and demand for services. The 10 councils are: Bristol City Council, Poole Borough Council, Swindon and Wiltshire Councils; Norfolk County Council; Waltham Forest Council; Somerset Council; Newcastle City Council; Nottingham City Council; and Nottinghamshire County Council.

Results 1 - 10 of 30

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News

Moving Memory

Moving Memory Practice example about how the Moving Memory Dance Theatre Company is challenging perceived notions of age and ageing.

Chatty Cafe Scheme

Chatty Cafe Scheme Practice example about how the Chatty Cafe Scheme is helping to tackle loneliness by bringing people of all ages together

Oomph! Wellness

Oomph! Wellness Practice example about how Oomph! Wellness is supporting staff to get older adults active and combat growing levels of social isolation

KOMP

KOMP Practice example about how KOMP, designed by No Isolation is helping older people stay connected with their families

LAUGH research project

LAUGH research project Practice example about a research project to develop highly personalised, playful objects for people with advanced dementia
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