#EXCLUDE#
#EXCLUDE#
#EXCLUDE#
#EXCLUDE#

Find prevention records by subject or service provider/commissioner name

  • Key to icons

    • Journal Prevention service example
    • Book Book
    • Digital media Digital media
    • Journal Journal article
    • Free resource Free resource

Results for 'joint working'

Results 11 - 20 of 22

Local early action: how to make it happen

COOTE Anna, BUA Adrian
2015

Reports on the work of the Southwark and Lambeth Early Action Commission which was set up to explore ways of taking local early action and preventative measures to improve people’s quality of life and reduce pressure on public services. The Commission carried out a review of local strategy, policy and practice; explored more than 30 examples of good practice in the two boroughs and further afield; and engaged with local residents and community-based groups and with other experts, through workshops and interviews. The Commission found the underlying causes of most social problems could be traced to the same social and economic challenges. Although some of these challenges, such as poverty and inequality were linked to national policy, making it hard to tackle them locally areas were identified where local early action could be effective in prevent problems. The Commission identified four goals for early action in Southwark and Lambeth: developing resourceful communities, where residents and groups act as agents of change; preventative places, where the quality of neighbourhoods has a positive impact on how people feel and enables them to help themselves and each other; strong partnerships between organisations; and where local institutions support early action. Case studies of good practice to support the report’s recommendations for prevention and early action are included.

Collaboration readiness: why it matters, how to build it, and where to start

KIPPIN Henry, BILLIALD Sarah
2015

Examines the role of cross-sector collaboration in ensuring the sustainability of public services, focusing on building readiness to deliver collaborative services to the public. The report introduces a Collaboration Readiness Index, bringing together lessons from work with local, national and international public service agencies that are trying to work differently with others to manage future demand and improve social outcomes on the ground. The index comprises six categories, designed to capture and measure the readiness and capacity of: collaborative citizens; collaborative systems; collaborative services; collaborative places; collaborative markets; and collaborative behaviours. This conceptual framework is supported through a more granular focus on 12 collaborative indicators, developed from a practice base and illustrated through case studies. The indicators are: readiness to engage; service user influence; collaborative outcomes; system risk and resilience; cross-sector delivery; demand management capability; place-based insight; civic and community collaboration; collaborative commissioning; provider-side innovation; cross-sector leadership; and behaviour change.

Joint review of investment in voluntary, community and social enterprise organisations in health and care sector

GREAT BRITAIN. Department of Health, et al
2015

This report summarises the initial findings of a review developed in co-production with the statutory and voluntary sectors, exploring how the sector could: maximise and demonstrate its impact; build sustainability and capacity; promote equality and address health inequalities. From January to March 2015 around 4,500 people and organisations were consulted, sharing their views on the current state of the statutory and VCSE sectors, the key challenges they face, including reduced funding, and the potential of the sector, particularly in relation to equality and health inequalities, prevention and resilience, and personalisation and co-production.

Supporting influence on health and wellbeing boards: report from survey 2015

REGIONAL VOICES
2015

This report lays out the results from a survey for the voluntary and community sector (VCS), between December 2014 and January 2015, about how it is engaging with health and wellbeing boards. 119 people responded sharing their experiences from across England. While some good practice for how boards involve the VCS is emerging, some challenges remain. VCS appears to be under-utilised by local partners in health and care. Although there is considerable desire in the VCS to work with HWBs, only 22 per cent of respondents reported being able to link in with local Healthwatch or a sub-group of the HWB and around 30 per cent were able to raise issues with a VCS representative and only 9 per cent of respondents felt their organisation was linked with the work of the HWB (a reduction since the last survey). There is strong awareness that resources for local engagement are limited - with reduced capacity of local authority officers, commissioners (health and LA), the VCS and Healthwatch to work together. VCS organisations ask for clearer routes of engagement; timely involvement; and for information about developments to be shared from the board.

The prevention revolution: transforming health and social care

ACEVO. Taskforce on Prevention in Health
2013

This report sets out a number of recommendations aimed at shifting focus and investment towards the provision of integrated, preventative care and support. It looks at three key areas: changing the culture and practices at the local level; changing national-level frameworks and incentives; and the role of long-term investment in driving transformation. The report calls for a ‘prevention revolution’, in which preventative support, advice and treatment is fully integrated into all stages of the care pathway, with the aim of addressing the wider determinants of ill-health, supporting people to manage long-term conditions more effectively, and providing treatment and support in community settings wherever possible, reducing the need for treatment in acute settings. Throughout the report, there is an emphasis on the role played by voluntary organisations in: providing preventative, holistic care in community settings; fostering innovation; strengthening patient engagement; and catalysing cultural change.

For future living: innovative approaches to joining up housing and health

DAVIES Bill
2014

Examines older people’s expectations from their housing and housing providers and the choices the UK housing market currently offers older and vulnerable people, and explores innovative housing and care solutions that could meet the demands of an ageing population and more widely support people with other social needs. The study drew on both quantitative surveys and qualitative interviews undertaken in previous research to establish what older groups need and expect from the housing market, and then used statistical methods to create a clear picture of the housing that older people inhabit now and the choices that the English housing market offers to them. Having established that the market presents only a limited range of options to older people, the research explored the international literature to identify different models of housing and support, focusing on countries that face similar demographic challenges. The report considers ideas that could potentially be adopted in England and adapted to an English housing and health context. A number of options were tested with two focus groups, involving over-55s and over-65s. Finally, based on the information drawn from the research, and through consultation with external experts, this report outlines a range of possible policy measures designed to ensure that the current and future stock of housing for older people is more effectively focused on supporting their health requirements.

Combatting loneliness: a guide for local authorities

LOCAL GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION
2012

Loneliness is a significant and growing issue for many older people.  Research over decades has found that acute loneliness has been consistently estimated to affect around 10-13% of the population of older people. Over the same time period, there has been a growing percentage of older people who sometimes feel lonely. Loneliness makes older people vulnerable to developing chronic health problems, depression and increases the need for social care services or residential care. This guide offers a brief summary of key research on the issue of loneliness, and some practical steps every local authority, working in partnership with other statutory bodies and their partners, can take to tackle loneliness, setting them in the context of an overall framework for action. The described framework comprises 3 tiers of actions: at the strategic level across the local authority; at the level of the community; and at the level of the individual. Suggested practical steps are illustrated by case studies drawn from around the country.

Beginning with the end in mind: how outcomes-based commissioning can help unlock the potential of community services

NHS CONFEDERATION. Community Health Services Forum
2014

Explains outcomes-based commissioning and outlines how it might help enable service transformation. Outcomes-based commissioning incentivises high-value interventions, shifting resources to services in the community, a focus on keeping people healthy and in their own homes, delivering outcomes that matter to people using the services, and coordinated care. It discusses the opportunities that outcomes-based commissioning gives for providers of community services, including the main technical considerations that will need to be addressed. Health outcomes have become the standard for measuring successful care. More and more people are living with long-term, and often multiple, conditions. This briefing argues that successful care for this group of people is not about providing a cure or a certain number of procedures, but about enabling and supporting them to live as well as possible with their conditions over the long term. Achieving this will involve transforming the system so that all of its parts work in an integrated way towards the outcomes people want and need most. Unlocking the unmet potential in community settings is crucial in both transforming care and improving efficiency. The briefing includes practical examples showcasing how community providers are using innovative ways of supporting and enabling people with high levels of clinical need to be cared for at home or more locally, and are working in partnership with other health and care providers. It will be of interest to all commissioners and providers considering developing an outcomes-based commissioning approach that includes community health services. It is particularly relevant to providers of community services.

New jobs old roles: working for prevention in a whole-system model of health and social care for older people

SMITH Naomi, BARNES Marian
2013

The ‘Partnerships for Older People Projects’ programme provided government funding for local and health authorities to pilot prevention and intervention services in partnership with the voluntary sector and older people between 2006 and 2009. This evaluation of a pilot in southern England used a Theory of Change approach to gather and reflect on data with different groups involved in the delivery of this model of prevention. This whole-system model, although complex and challenging to implement, was considered overall to have been a success and provided significant learning for partners and stakeholders on the challenges and benefits of working across professional and sectoral boundaries. New posts were created as part of the model – two of these, recruited to and managed by voluntary sector partners, were identified as ‘new jobs’, but echoed ‘old roles’ within community and voluntary sector based health and social care. The authors reflect on the parallels of these roles with previously existing roles and ways of working and reflect on how the whole-system approach of this particular pilot enabled these new jobs to develop in appropriate and successful ways.

Prevention matters: delivering a prevention-focused model for adult services in Buckinghamshire County Council

BUCKINGHAMSHIRE COUNTY COUNCIL
2012

Sets out a prevention-focused model of adult health and social care services which place emphasis on maintaining people’s independence and resilience; preventing deterioration into substantial or critical categories of need. The document outlines the current system challenges, the existing lack of joint working between sectors and services, a reactive approach to creating support services and networks and a lack of confidence or capacity to innovate and invest in prevention without an evidence base or business case. It then presents a framework for building the evidence for investment in prevention, proposing a measurement methodology and a definition of the target user group and of outcomes and impact. The document puts forward a new prevention-orientated service model, identifying the high‐level functions, which are shared by different agents and delivery mechanisms, on which the model rests. These are: intelligence and knowledge about the effectiveness of prevention‐related activities, bridging and building networks between formal and informal service delivery, connecting people, maximising existing resources and motivating and enabling. The document examines the core components of the model, which include an intelligence hub, a volunteer hub, community links officers, and community prevention officers. Funding and implementation considerations are also included.

Results 11 - 20 of 22

#EXCLUDE#
Ask about support on integration, STPs and transformation
ENQUIRE
Related SCIE content
Related NICE content
Related external content
Visit Social Care Online, the UK’s largest database of information and research on all aspects of social care and social work.
SEARCH NOW
Submit prevention service example
SUBMIT
What do you think about SCIE's work?
FEEDBACK
#EXCLUDE#
#EXCLUDE#
#EXCLUDE#