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Results for 'learning disabilities'

Results 1 - 10 of 22

ConnectWELL

ConnectWELL

Introducing ConnectWELL - a social prescribing service – initially funded and piloted in 2014 by NHS Rugby CCG, which aims to improve health and wellbeing for patients and clients. ConnectWELL provides Health Professionals with just one, straightforward referral route to the many Voluntary and Community Sector organisations, groups and activities that can address underlying societal causes, manage or prevent compounding factors of ill-health. ConnectWELL has over 900 organisations and activities, ranging from Carers’ support, community groups, disability services, Faith / Religious / Cultural Activities, Housing / Homelessness Support, Mentoring, Music Groups, and volunteering opportunities.

Building bridges to a good life: a review of asset based, person centred approaches and people with learning disabilities in Scotland

McNEISH Di, SCOTT Sarah, WILLIAMS Jennie
2016

This review explores the potential to join up thinking on increased choice and control for people with learning disabilities and the principles of asset based working. Commissioned by the Scottish Commission for Learning Disability, it considers the efficacy of asset based approaches for people with learning disabilities, looks at evidence of the impact these approaches can have on people’s lives and also identifies examples of good practice in Scotland. The review draws on the results of a literature review; interviews with key informants involved in asset based working and learning disability services; and a mapping of projects using asset based principles with people with learning disabilities across Scotland. The results suggest that there are is reason why the focus of assets work cannot be broadened to include opportunities for people with learning disabilities. However it suggests that asset based approaches should be seen in the context of efforts to advance the personalisation and social integration agendas, and that if that they need to fit alongside services, support systems and initiatives. Examples included in the review illustrate how services can add to the assets of individuals and communities, provided they are willing and committed to relating to people and doing things differently. Factors identified that facilitate asset based approaches with people with learning disabilities, include: addressing wider inequalities and stigma; ensuring people with learning disabilities are active participants in place based community development; and tackling attitudinal barriers and established ways of doing things.

The state of Shared Lives in England: report 2017

SHARED LIVES PLUS
2017

This report draws a survey of Shared Lives schemes in England to provide an analysis of services across England for the period 2015/16. The report provides figures on the numbers of people who use Shared Lives services, the type of arrangements they live in (live-in, short break and day support), the regional breakdown of services, the number and characteristics of carers, and staffing levels. The report finds that the Shared Lives sector has grown by 5 per cent over the past year, with approximately 11880 people being supported in Shared Lives arrangements. People with learning disabilities remained the primary users of the service, making up 71 percent of all users. This is despite a small reduction in the number of people with learning disabilities accessing the service in the previous year. The next largest group getting help from Shared Lives were people with mental health problems, who made up 8 per cent of users. Short case studies are included to illustrate the benefits of Shared Lives schemes. It ends with key learning from the past year and identifies some of the key factors and barriers to the successful expansion of Shared Lives.

ExtraCare's Wellbeing Programme

The ExtraCare Charitable Trust

ExtraCare’s Wellbeing Programme was developed in 2002, in partnership with older people who live at ExtraCare’s Schemes and Villages. The concept was launched following a survey, which highlighted that 75% of residents at one location had not accessed any health screening via their GPs or the NHS. A pilot screening scheme subsequently identified 122 previously undetected conditions amongst a population of just 136, highlighting a clear need for the Programme.

Stay Up Late

Stay Up Late

Stay Up Late initiated as a campaign, set up by the punk band Heavy Load who played at many learning disability social clubs and discos, but were frustrated seeing the venues empty at around 9pm. They wanted to challenge and transform the practice of care homes and support workers operating strict rotas, thus excluding a whole population from enjoying late evenings socialising.

Mates 'n Dates

Guideposts Trust

"Before I joined Mates and Dates I didn’t go out in the evening unless it was a family occasion. Now I can look forward to going out once a month and to dates with my girlfriend in-between. It gives me something to look forward to.”

Making it happen: take action to get people with a learning disability, autism and/or challenging behaviour out of inpatient units. A guide for campaigners about Transforming Care Partnerships

MENCAP, CHALLENGING BEHAVIOUR FOUNDATION, NATIONAL AUTISTIC SOCIETY
2016

Guide to help local groups and individuals campaign for change to enable people with a learning disability, autism and/or challenging behaviour to move from inpatient units into the community. The guide highlights NHS England's promise in 'Building the Right Support' to close 35-50 per cent of inpatient beds and develop the right support in the communities by March 2019. It sets out the scale of the challenge and outlines the role of the 48 Transforming Care Partnerships, set up to implement NHS England's plans. The guide then provides advice on how campaigning groups and individuals can contact local Transforming Care Partnerships to find out more about their plans and find out what is being done to develop the right support. It includes a template letter to help contact local Partnerships; a checklist of key principles that should be included in Transforming Care Partnership plans; and a list organisations that can provide further support.

Sixteen (16)

Mutually Inclusive Partnerships

‘16’ is a service that blends tried and tested supported employment approaches with person-centred methods. The goal is to enable service users to achieve their personal employment related outcomes. The service supports a range of groups.

Community Circles

Community Circles

Originally run as a pilot, Community Circles began in 2012 and are now located throughout the UK providing support in the community, by the community, helping people to achieve their goals in a way and place that suits them – from living rooms to care homes. Everyone in a circle gains by being part of something shared, focused and often life changing.

The state of Shared Lives in England: report 2016

SHARED LIVES PLUS
2016

This report draws on a survey of Shared Lives Plus members across the country to provide an analysis of services across England, covering the period 2014/15. The report includes figures on numbers of people using Shared Lives services, the number of carers, staff turnover and motivation, types of arrangement (live in, short breaks and day support) and numbers of users by region. The results show that the number of people using Shared Lives support is continuing to rise. In 2014/15 11,570 people were getting help from Shared Lives compared to 10,440 in 2013/14. People with learning disabilities remain the primary users of Shared Lives support, accounting for 76% of all users. The next largest group getting help via Shared Lives were people with mental health problems who made up 7% of users. The survey also reports a rise in both the number of older people and people with dementia using Shared Lives. There has also been an increase of over 50% in use of Shared Lives as day support. Projected cost savings are provided to show the total savings that could be made if Shared Lives reached its full potential. Short case studies are also included to illustrate the benefits of Shared Lives schemes.

Results 1 - 10 of 22

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