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Results for 'leisure activities'

Results 1 - 10 of 33

Psychological benefits of attending the theatre associated with positive affect and well-being for subscribers over age 60

MEEKS Suzanne, VANDENBROUCKE Russell J., SHRYOCK S. Kelly
2020

Objectives: Although late adulthood may be a time of greater well-being, optimal aging still characterizes a minority of older adults. Understanding how individuals achieve well-being across adulthood is important for intervention and social policy. This study focused on how attending live theatre might enhance the well-being of a sample of 53 season ticket holders aged 60 and older. Based on a previously tested conceptual framework, we hypothesized that post-performance reports of social-cognitive experience while at the play would predict post-performance positive affect, which in turn would predict well-being. Method: The sample was a subset of volunteers from a large survey study of theatre ticket purchasers. They completed baseline and two-year follow-up measures of well-being, and questionnaires immediately after attending seven plays across two seasons: measures of social engagement, belonging, flow, positive affect, and their reactions to the plays. Results: This study found that sense of belonging, social engagement, and flow were associated with positive affect after performances, as hypothesized. This study also found that the cumulative positive affect experienced after plays in the two seasons predicted change in well-being between baseline and follow-up. Conclusion: The findings suggest that attending performances is a combined social, cognitive, and affective experience that transcends entertainment. Future research might investigate whether the psychological benefit model assessed in this study will generalize to other leisure activities that create similar engagement. The findings have implications for individuals seeking to promote their own well-being, and, possibly more importantly, for policies that support enriching cultural opportunities, particularly in the arts.

Living well with dementia through music: a resource book for activities providers and care staff


2020

A guide to music activities for people with dementia for use by activity leaders, care staff and therapists, drawing on the expertise of people regularly using music in their work. The ideas show the varied ways that music can enhance the daily lives from the early to late stage of dementia. It includes chapters on the creative uses of technology, such as tablets and personal playlists. It also covers general considerations for using music with people living with dementia in institutional settings, including evaluating and recording outcomes.

A systematic review of interventions for loneliness among older adults living in long-term care facilities

QUAN Nicolas G., et al
2019

Objectives: This study aimed to review loneliness interventions for older adults living in long-term care (LTC) facilities over the past 10 years, to categorise interventions by type, and to compare effectiveness of loneliness interventions in these settings. Methods: Systematic review followed PRISMA guidelines. Articles matching search criteria were collected from PubMed, PsycINFO, and Web of Science from 2009 to 2019. The inclusion criteria were as follows: 1) English language, 2) intervention studies with a quantitative measure that compares pre-trial to post-trial changes, 3) loneliness as a primary or secondary outcome 4) subjects age >65, and 5) subjects living in a LTC facility, such as a nursing home, assisted-living, or hospice. Results: A total of 15 intervention studies qualified for systematic review. Most of these interventions were psychological therapies and leisure/skill development interventions. Approximately, 87% of studies reported significant decreases in loneliness following intervention. Laughter therapy, horticultural therapy, and reminiscence therapy were associated with the greatest decreases in loneliness. Discussion: Results suggest that, although less common than interventions in the community, there are several effective interventions to reduce loneliness among older adults living in LTC facilities. Lack of standardised measures and high-quality studies limits comparisons between intervention types and generalizability to different populations.

The intergenerational evaluation toolkit

JARROTT Shannon
2019

Intergenerational shared sites and intergenerational programmes that bring younger and older generations together can have many positive benefits. This Toolkit provides three resources to support programme providers and researchers to demonstrate the impact of intergenerational programming and the practices which achieve outcomes. The toolkit includes an Intergenerational Practice Evaluation tool to evaluate single intergenerational activities and the impact of programmes over time; a guide to planning an intergenerational evaluation; and a list of reliable outcome measures. The toolkit has been developed following 15 years of collaborative innovative practice and evaluation research.

The role of the visual arts in the resilience of people living with dementia in care homes

NEWMAN Andrew, et al
2019

This study responds to a gap in the literature relating to the resilience of people living with dementia in care homes. The research applied an ecopsychosocial framework of resilience, theorising that sources of resilience may be personal, social and structural. Visual arts enrichment activities were examined to see how they might provide opportunities for resilience. The data used for this study were qualitative and originated from people with dementia aged between 70 and 99 years old (N = 48) living in four care homes in North East England, United Kingdom and staff/carers/family members (N = 37). The results showed that visual arts enrichment activities supported the resilience of those with dementia through creative expression, increased communication, improved self-esteem, and influenced relationships with carers and family members. It is concluded that even those with advanced dementia are capable of demonstrating resilience which can be supported by, and explored through, visual arts enrichment activities.

Effect of board game activities on cognitive function improvement among older adults in adult day care centers

CHING-TENG Yao
2019

Stimulating leisure activities are considered as possible protective factors against dementia and cognitive decline in older adults, particularly due to the enhancement of cognitive reserve. This study tested the effectiveness of board game activities improving the cognitive function of older adults in adult day care centres. This was a quasi‐experimental study. A purposive sampling strategy was used to select 82 subjects who were aged 65 and above with intact mental functions and currently residing in adult day care centres. 41 subjects who participated in a selection of 12 board game activities were assigned to the experimental group and 41 subjects who adhered to their ordinary activities were allocated to the control group. Structured questionnaires of the board game programs were used for data collection. The board game programs showed promising effects in the cognitive function of older adults living in adult day care centres. A possible beneficial effect of board game playing on the risk of dementia could be mediated by a less cognitive decline in older adults. Board game activities may benefit the cognitive function of older adults. Incorporating board game activities into social work care may help develop long‐term care into a more diverse, unique and innovative direction.

Treasury of arts activities for older people

Postlethwaite Liz
2019

A collection of 50 participatory arts activities to provide practical ideas and inspiration for those working with older people in any setting. The collection includes short activities that take 15 minutes or less, longer activities, and planned workshops of 45 minutes or more. They cover visual art, music, movement and dance, performance and stories and poetry. The publication also provide min-guides that explore the challenges of working with older people, things to consider when working in different settings or when working with people with dementia. A selection of links are also included to help develop further skills.

Impact of a dementia-specific program of equine-assisted activities: providers’ perspectives

FIELDS Beth, WOOD Wendy, LASSELL Rebecca
2019

Purpose: Establishing acceptability of complex interventions to stakeholders is vital in early scientific development. The purpose of this paper is to ascertain the acceptability of a program of equine-assisted activities (EAAP) for people with dementia by elucidating programmatic practices needed to enhance their safety and quality of life (QoL) from the perspectives of service providers. Design/methodology/approach: Semi-structured interviews with five providers were analyzed using a basic qualitative approach. Findings: Providers perceived the EAAP as acceptable and revealed potential mechanisms of change supporting well-being, including aspects related to the physical and social environment and person with dementia. Linkages identified among the EAAP and its physical and social context support its complexity. Providers explicated program practices that promoted safety and QoL, such as implementing staff trainings and tailoring activities to each person’s preferences and needs. These practices aligned with best dementia care approaches, underscoring that the EAAP is a promising complex intervention that merits further scientific development. Originality/value: This work is novel and adds to the literature by illuminating the role of a community-based, animal-assisted program for enhancing the QoL of older adults with dementia residing in institutional care facilities.

The Kinect Project: group motion-based gaming for people living with dementia

DOVE Erica, ASTELL Arelene
2019

Engaging in enjoyable activities is an essential part of well-being, but people with dementia can find participation increasingly difficult. Motion-based technologies can provide meaningful engagement in a wide range of activities, but for people with dementia to take advantage of these devices requires a good understanding of how best to select and present these activities to this population. The objective of this study was to explore the use of motion-based technology (Xbox Kinect) as a group activity for people with dementia who attend adult day programmes. This qualitative study took place in an adult day programme for older adults with age-related challenges. Participants (n = 23) were observed while playing a digital bowling game presented on Xbox Kinect one hour per week for a period of 20 weeks, to capture naturalistic data. Field notes generated through observations were transcribed and analysed to identify emerging themes. The findings revealed three predominant themes which illustrate the potential of motion-based technology as a group activity for people with dementia who attend adult day programmes: (a) the importance of having a trained trainer, (b) learning versus mastery and (c) playing ‘independently together’. People with dementia can learn to play games presented on motion-based technology and enjoy doing so. Furthermore, using the technology in a group setting fostered an encouraging and supportive environment which further contributed to the leisure experience. However, to be used most effectively, staff must be trained to set-up and interact with the technology, as well as introduce, teach and support people with dementia to use it.

Cultural engagement and incident depression in older adults: evidence from the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing

FANCOURT Daisy, TYMOSZUK Urszula
2019

Background: There is a recognised need for the identification of factors that might be protective against the development of depression in older adults. Over the past decade, there has been growing research demonstrating the effects of cultural engagement (which combines a number of protective factors including social interaction, cognitive stimulation and gentle physical activity) on the treatment of depression, but as yet not on its prevention. Aims: To explore whether cultural engagement in older adults is associated with a reduced risk of developing depression over the following decade. Method: Working with data from 2148 adults in the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing who were free from depression at baseline, the study used logistic regression models to explore associations between frequency of cultural engagement (including going to museums, theatre and cinema) and the risk of developing depression over the following 10 years using a combined index of the Centre for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale (CES-D) and physician-diagnosed depression. Results: There was a dose–response relationship between frequency of cultural engagement and the risk of developing depression independent of sociodemographic, health-related and social confounders. This equated to a 32% lower risk of developing depression for people who attended every few months (odds ratio (OR) = 0.68, 95% CI 0.47–0.99, P = 0.046) and a 48% lower risk for people who attended once a month or more (OR = 0.52, 95% CI 0.34–0.80, P = 0.003). Results were robust to sensitivity analyses exploring reverse causality, subclinical depressive symptoms and alternative CES-D thresholds. Conclusions: Cultural engagement appears to be an independent risk-reducing factor for the development of depression in older age.

Results 1 - 10 of 33

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News

Moving Memory

Moving Memory Practice example about how the Moving Memory Dance Theatre Company is challenging perceived notions of age and ageing.

Chatty Cafe Scheme

Chatty Cafe Scheme Practice example about how the Chatty Cafe Scheme is helping to tackle loneliness by bringing people of all ages together

Oomph! Wellness

Oomph! Wellness Practice example about how Oomph! Wellness is supporting staff to get older adults active and combat growing levels of social isolation

KOMP

KOMP Practice example about how KOMP, designed by No Isolation is helping older people stay connected with their families

LAUGH research project

LAUGH research project Practice example about a research project to develop highly personalised, playful objects for people with advanced dementia
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