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Results for 'leisure activities'

Results 1 - 10 of 40

The role of collaborative working between the arts and care sectors in successfully delivering participatory arts activities for older people in residential care settings

BUNGAY Hilary, et al
2021

In the UK support for older people living in residential care to undertake meaningful activities is provided by Activities Co-ordinators. There is also a growing trend for care home providers to invite arts organisations into care settings to deliver a range of arts and cultural activities. These arts and cultural activities are delivered by Arts Facilitators, who are distinct from Activities Co-ordinators because their practice is specifically in an art form. This paper presents findings from the Creative Journeys research project which focused on exploring the role of participatory arts within residential care home in developing and maintaining social relationships between residents and staff. One of the objectives of the research was to identify factors which facilitated or hindered the delivery and impact of the activities. Data collection methods included observations and semi-structured interviews with residents and staff. Thematic analysis was conducted on the qualitative data. It was found that a key factor in the successful delivery of the groups was the working relationship between the Arts Facilitators and the Activities Co-ordinators. This relationship is explored and presented under three main themes: the collaborative process, practicalities and preparation and the approach of the Arts Facilitator. The Activities Co-ordinators’ role is an under-researched area, but they play a central role in supporting visiting arts organisations to deliver the sessions and in enabling residents to attend and engage with meaningful activities.

Evidence on the contribution of community gardens to promote physical and mental health and well-being of non-institutionalized individuals: a systematic review

LAMPERT Tarsila, et al
2021

Objectives: To synthetize the literature about physical and mental health outcomes associated with community gardening. Two main questions were addressed: a) is there evidence, from quantitative studies, that community gardening is associated to physical and mental health and well-being of non-institutionalized individuals? b) Does community gardening provokes any discomfort in terms of physical health, i.e., bodily pain, to their beneficiaries? Methods: A systematic review of the literature was carried out following PRISMA guidelines by searching relevant electronic databases (PubMed, Scopus, and Web of Science). Empirical, quantitative studies published in English with no restrictions concerning the date of publication were considered eligible. The quality of the evidence was appraised using the tool developed by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute of the National Institutes of Health for Observational Cohort and Cross-Sectional Studies. Results: Overall, 8 studies were considered eligible, of which seven studies were rated as having good methodological quality (one scored as fair). Community gardeners had significantly better health outcomes than their neighbours not engaged in gardening activities in terms of life satisfaction, happiness, general health, mental health, and social cohesion. Conclusion: Community gardens are associated to health gains for their users, irrespective of age, being an affordable and efficient way of promoting physical and mental health and well-being. To encourage the design, maintenance, and prospective evaluation of supportive urban environments promoting healthy and, at the same time, sustainable lifestyles, is essential to achieve public health gains and environmental sustainability.

Enabling middle‐aged and older adults accessing community services to reduce social isolation: Community Connectors

GIEBEL Clarissa, et al
2020

A large number of older adults (65+ years) live on their own, and can experience high levels of loneliness. However, accessing activities to engage with their community can be difficult either due to their age and associated comorbidities, such as frailty, or due to financial reasons, for lacking the funds to access transport to activities. The aim of this study was to evaluate an existing service in the North West of England, Community Connectors, which enables people aged 18 and above to access social activities within their community in order to reduce loneliness and social isolation. This study only included middle‐aged and older adults. A total of 13 semi‐structured interviews were performed after people had taken part in the 14‐week Community Connectors programme. Data were coded by two research team members by using thematic analysis. Members of the public were involved in the design of this study, and in the dissemination. Between June 2017 to September 2018, 234 older adults and 53 middle‐aged adults were referred to Community Connectors. Four themes emerged from the interviews: falling out of society; easy self‐referral; structured supportive services; and reconnecting with community. Services often depend on individuals making the first step to access, however, without easy or facilitated access people can becoming isolated. Participants reported on how Community Connectors provided easy and open access that enabled better response to individual needs. The structured support provided individuals with confidence in engaging with community activities and enhanced individuals’ social networks. Community Connectors enables middle‐aged and older adults to engage with social activities in their community, and thus helps participants to feel less lonely and more socially connected. Future work needs to quantitatively measure the impacts of the service on loneliness, depression, and social connectedness in order to fully understand their impact.

Community garden initiatives addressing health and well-being outcomes: a systematic review of infodemiology aspects, outcomes, and target populations

GREGIS Anna, et al
2021

Previous research has suggested that activities such as community gardens could offer a wide range of health benefits. The aim of the article is to systematically review the available literature to analyse the magnitude of the phenomenon, the geographical distribution, and the main characteristics in terms of health outcomes and target populations. The search addresses the question whether the activity in community gardens improves health and well-being outcomes of individuals. From the total amount of 7226, 84 selected articles showed that:(1) up to 50% are published by U.S. universities or institutions; (2) up to 44% of the studies considered “community gardens” as the main activity of the research focus; (3) one-third of the studies included adults; (4) almost 25% of the studies used “general health” as the main outcome when investigating the benefits of community gardens; (5) the percentage of studies that achieved their outcomes was heterogeneous among the different health dimensions. In conclusion, while a certain degree of heterogeneity in the used definition and outcome still exist, community gardens may be a viable strategy for well-being promotion in terms of psychological, social, and physical health and may be considered as an innovative urban strategy to promote urban public health.

Intergroup ‘Skype’ quiz sessions in care homes to reduce loneliness and social isolation in older people

ZAMIR Sonam, et al
2020

Video calls using software such as Skype, Zoom and FaceTime can improve socialisation among older people and family, however it is unknown if video calls are able to improve socialisation among older people and their peers. Twenty-two residents across three British care homes engaged with each other using ‘Skype quiz’ sessions with the support of staff once a month over an eight-month trial. Video calls were accessed via a ‘Skype on Wheels’ intervention that comprised a wheeled device that could hold an iPad, or through Skype TV. Residents met other residents from the three care homes to build new friendships and participate in a thirty-minute quiz session facilitated by eight staff. Staff were collaborators who recruited older people, implemented the intervention and provided feedback that was analysed using thematic analysis. Residents enjoyed being able to see other residents’ faces and surroundings. Analysis of the field notes revealed five themes of: residents with dementia remember faces not technology, inter and intra connectedness, re-gaining sense of self and purpose, situational loneliness overcome and organisational issues create barriers to long-term implementation. Inter-care home connection through video calls to reduce feelings of loneliness in residents seems acceptable and a feasible, low cost model, especially during times of public crisis such as COVID-19

Virtual quizzes involving several care homes are feasible and might reduce loneliness and social isolation

NATIONAL INSTITUTE FOR HEALTH RESEARCH
2021

Summarises findings of a study that trialled connecting care homes virtually via quiz sessions. Simple low-cost video technology allowed residents in different care homes to enjoy taking part in virtual quizzes. Twenty-two care home residents, from three homes, volunteered to take part. Residents with dementia, signs of cognitive decline, and hearing or visual impairments were included. Some residents were non-verbal, or had limited mobility, and some had no prior experience of video calls. Afterwards, staff and residents provided feedback on the benefits and feasibility of the sessions. Four themes emerged from interviews with staff and residents: residents with moderate-advanced dementia remembered faces and conversations but could not recall having seen the technology before – they expressed happiness when remembering conversations with people ‘outside’ of their care home, and answering questions in a ‘game’; residents felt more connected with others – within the same care home, residents learnt more about each other’s backgrounds and interests and across care homes they enjoyed comparing features of their environments; residents re-gained a sense of self by sharing their stories and remembering their pasts with people of a similar age; the virtual quizzes provided relief from loneliness or boredom. Most residents said the video calls helped them to ‘pass the time’ and gave them ‘something to do’. Residents said the quizzes encouraged them to get to know others within the same home more than passive activities, such as watching TV. Across care homes, residents were surprised that there were so many people with similar interests or professions, or who had grown up in the same area as they had.

Activities outside of the care setting for people with dementia: a systematic review

D'CUNHA Nathan Martin, et al
2020

Objectives To summarise the evidence from interventions investigating the effects of out of care setting activities on people with dementia living in residential aged care. Design A systematic review. Methods: A systematic search of electronic databases (PubMed, PsycINFO, Scopus, Web of Science and the Cochrane Library) was performed to identify intervention trials published from journal inception to January 2020. Controlled trials, or quasi-experimental trials, which measured pre-intervention, post-intervention or during-intervention outcomes, where the participants were required to leave the care setting to participate in an intervention, were eligible for inclusion. Quality appraisal of the studies was performed following the Cochrane Collaboration’s Risk of Bias or Newcastle-Ottawa Scale tools. Results: Of the 4155 articles screened, 11 articles met the inclusion criteria from 9 different studies. The number of participants in the studies ranged from 6 to 70 people living with dementia and lasted for 3 weeks up to 5 months. The interventions were aquatic exercise, wheelchair cycling, art gallery discussion groups, an intergenerational mentorship programme, horse riding, walking and outdoor gardening. Overall, the studies indicated preliminary evidence of psychological (n=7), physical (n=4) and physiological (n=1) benefits, and all interventions were feasible to conduct away from the aged care facilities. However, the low number of participants in the included studies (n=177), the absence of a control group in all but three studies, and potential for selection bias, limits the generalisability of the findings. Conclusions: Activities outside of the residential aged care setting have the potential to be effective at providing a range of benefits for people living with dementia. Higher quality studies are required to encourage care providers to implement these type of activities in dementia care settings.

Psychological benefits of attending the theatre associated with positive affect and well-being for subscribers over age 60

MEEKS Suzanne, VANDENBROUCKE Russell J., SHRYOCK S. Kelly
2020

Objectives: Although late adulthood may be a time of greater well-being, optimal aging still characterizes a minority of older adults. Understanding how individuals achieve well-being across adulthood is important for intervention and social policy. This study focused on how attending live theatre might enhance the well-being of a sample of 53 season ticket holders aged 60 and older. Based on a previously tested conceptual framework, we hypothesized that post-performance reports of social-cognitive experience while at the play would predict post-performance positive affect, which in turn would predict well-being. Method: The sample was a subset of volunteers from a large survey study of theatre ticket purchasers. They completed baseline and two-year follow-up measures of well-being, and questionnaires immediately after attending seven plays across two seasons: measures of social engagement, belonging, flow, positive affect, and their reactions to the plays. Results: This study found that sense of belonging, social engagement, and flow were associated with positive affect after performances, as hypothesized. This study also found that the cumulative positive affect experienced after plays in the two seasons predicted change in well-being between baseline and follow-up. Conclusion: The findings suggest that attending performances is a combined social, cognitive, and affective experience that transcends entertainment. Future research might investigate whether the psychological benefit model assessed in this study will generalize to other leisure activities that create similar engagement. The findings have implications for individuals seeking to promote their own well-being, and, possibly more importantly, for policies that support enriching cultural opportunities, particularly in the arts.

Living well with dementia through music: a resource book for activities providers and care staff


2020

A guide to music activities for people with dementia for use by activity leaders, care staff and therapists, drawing on the expertise of people regularly using music in their work. The ideas show the varied ways that music can enhance the daily lives from the early to late stage of dementia. It includes chapters on the creative uses of technology, such as tablets and personal playlists. It also covers general considerations for using music with people living with dementia in institutional settings, including evaluating and recording outcomes.

A systematic review of interventions for loneliness among older adults living in long-term care facilities

QUAN Nicolas G., et al
2019

Objectives: This study aimed to review loneliness interventions for older adults living in long-term care (LTC) facilities over the past 10 years, to categorise interventions by type, and to compare effectiveness of loneliness interventions in these settings. Methods: Systematic review followed PRISMA guidelines. Articles matching search criteria were collected from PubMed, PsycINFO, and Web of Science from 2009 to 2019. The inclusion criteria were as follows: 1) English language, 2) intervention studies with a quantitative measure that compares pre-trial to post-trial changes, 3) loneliness as a primary or secondary outcome 4) subjects age >65, and 5) subjects living in a LTC facility, such as a nursing home, assisted-living, or hospice. Results: A total of 15 intervention studies qualified for systematic review. Most of these interventions were psychological therapies and leisure/skill development interventions. Approximately, 87% of studies reported significant decreases in loneliness following intervention. Laughter therapy, horticultural therapy, and reminiscence therapy were associated with the greatest decreases in loneliness. Discussion: Results suggest that, although less common than interventions in the community, there are several effective interventions to reduce loneliness among older adults living in LTC facilities. Lack of standardised measures and high-quality studies limits comparisons between intervention types and generalizability to different populations.

Results 1 - 10 of 40

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