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Results for 'literature reviews'

Results 1 - 10 of 55

Ambient assisted living technologies to support older adults’ health and wellness: a systematic mapping review

CHOUKOU MA, et al
2021

While the proportion of the Older Adults (OAs) population is growing, this shift raises a challenging question: “How can we support OAs to lead independent and healthy lifestyle?”. Many researchers have been studying Ambient Assisted Living Technologies (or AALTs) over the last three decades to tackle this challenge. However, no literature can provide an overall view of research in the field of AALTs and linkages between technical development and related healthcare needs. Thus, we conducted a systematic mapping review of literature focusing on AALTs (N = 7006) to explore three main research questions: 1) When, where, and how AALTs are studied?; 2) What is the technological maturity level of AALTs used to support a health and wellness, and where were they evaluated and/or implemented?; and 3) To which health and wellness purposes are AALTs deployed? We found several noticeable imbalances in literature and identified some strategies to move this field of investigation further and to bring AALTs applications clser to clinical practice. While research in the area is gradually blossoming, the area mainly leads in only a few countries. Furthermore, the majority of research targeted asymptomatic older adults living at home. We hope this paper will help researchers easily understand what type of research, with whom, and where are available in AALT now. Potential challenges associated with AALTs research are also discussed.

Towards a contemporary social care ‘prevention narrative’ of principled complexity: an integrative literature review

VERITY Fiona, et al
2021

Prevention has become increasingly central in social care policy and commissioning strategies within the United Kingdom (UK). Commonly there is reliance on understandings borrowed from the sphere of public health, leaning on a prevention discourse characterised by the 'upstream and downstream' metaphor. Whilst framing both structural factors and responses to individual circumstances, the public health approach nonetheless suggests linearity in a cause and effect relationship. Social care and illness follow many trajectories and this conceptualisation of prevention may limit its effectiveness and scope in social care. Undertaken as part of a commissioned evaluation of the Social Services and Wellbeing Act (2014) Wales, a systematic integrative review was conducted to establish the key current debates within prevention work, and how prevention is conceptually framed, implemented and evaluated within the social care context. The databases Scopus, ASSIA, CINAHL and Social Care Online were initially searched in September 2019 resulting in 52 documents being incorporated for analysis. A further re-run of searches was run in March 2021, identifying a further 14 documents, thereby creating a total of 66. Predominantly, these were journal articles or research reports (n = 53), with the remainder guidance or strategy documents, briefings or process evaluations (n = 13). These were categorised by their primary theme and focus, as well as document format and research method before undergoing thematic analysis. This highlighted the continued prominence of three-tiered, linear public health narratives in the framing of prevention for social care, with prevention work often categorised and enacted with inconsistency. Common drivers for prevention activity continue to be cost reduction and reduced dependence on the care system in the future. Through exploring prevention for older people and caregivers, we argue for an approach to prevention aligning with the complexities of the social world surrounding it. Building on developments in complexity theory in social science and healthcare, we offer an alternative view of social care prevention guided by principles rooted in the everyday realities of communities, service users and caregivers.

A systematic scoping review of community-based interventions for the prevention of mental ill-health and the promotion of mental health in older adults in the UK

LEE Caroline, et al
2021

Background: Mental health concerns in older adults are common, with increasing age-related risks to physical health, mobility and social isolation. Community-based approaches are a key focus of public health strategy in the UK, and may reduce the impact of these risks, protecting mental health and promoting wellbeing. This study conducted a review of UK community-based interventions to understand the types of intervention studied and mental health/wellbeing impacts reported. Method: This study conducted a scoping review of the literature, systematically searching six electronic databases (2000–2020) to identify academic studies of any non-clinical community intervention to improve mental health or wellbeing outcomes for older adults. Data were extracted, grouped by population targeted, intervention type, and outcomes reported, and synthesised according to a framework categorising community actions targeting older adults. Results: In total, 1,131 full-text articles were assessed for eligibility and 54 included in the final synthesis. Example interventions included: link workers; telephone helplines; befriending; digital support services; group social activities. These were grouped into: connector services, gateway services/approaches, direct interventions and systems approaches. These interventions aimed to address key risk factors: loneliness, social isolation, being a caregiver and living with long-term health conditions. Outcome measurement varied greatly, confounding strong evidence in favour of particular intervention types. Conclusion: The literature is wide-ranging in focus and methodology. Greater specificity and consistency in outcome measurement are required to evidence effectiveness – no single category of intervention yet stands out as ‘promising’. More robust evidence on the active components of interventions to promote older adult's mental health is required.

Social isolation and psychological distress among older adults related to COVID-19: a narrative review of remotely-delivered interventions and recommendations

GORENKO Julie A., et al
2021

The COVID-19 pandemic is associated with several short- and long-term negative impacts on the well-being of older adults. Physical distancing recommendations to reduce transmission of the SARS-CoV2-19 virus increase the risk of social isolation and loneliness, which are associated with negative outcomes including anxiety, depression, cognitive decline, and mortality. Taken together, social isolation and additional psychological impacts of the pandemic (e.g., worry, grief) underscore the importance of intervention efforts to older adults. This narrative review draws upon a wide range of evidence to provide a comprehensive overview of appropriate remotely-delivered interventions for older adults that target loneliness and psychological symptoms. These include interventions delivered by a range of individuals (i.e., community members to mental health professionals), and interventions that vary by implementation (e.g., self-guided therapy, remotely-delivered interventions via telephone or video call). Recommendations to overcome barriers to implementation and delivery are provided, with consideration given to the different living situations.

Smart environments and social robots for age-friendly integrated care services

ANGHEL Ionut, et al
2020

The world is facing major societal challenges because of an aging population that is putting increasing pressure on the sustainability of care. While demand for care and social services is steadily increasing, the supply is constrained by the decreasing workforce. The development of smart, physical, social and age-friendly environments is identified by World Health Organization (WHO) as a key intervention point for enabling older adults, enabling them to remain as much possible in their residences, delay institutionalization, and ultimately, improve quality of life. This study surveyed smart environments, machine learning and robot assistive technologies that can offer support for the independent living of older adults and provide age-friendly care services. This study describes two examples of integrated care services that are using assistive technologies in innovative ways to assess and deliver of timely interventions for polypharmacy management and for social and cognitive activity support in older adults. This study describes the architectural views of these services, focusing on details about technology usage, end-user interaction flows and data models that are developed or enhanced to achieve the envisioned objective of healthier, safer, more independent and socially connected older people.

Social prescribing could empower patients to address non-medical problems in their lives

NATIONAL INSTITUTE FOR HEALTH RESEARCH
2020

This NIHR Alert reports on a review carried out by researchers on the NIHR Evidence Synthesis Working Group to understand how GP social prescribing schemes work and when they are most effective. Researchers reviewed 118 documents evaluating social prescribing schemes and the link worker role in the UK. They found social prescribing schemes increase patients’ confidence, motivation and the skills to manage their own wellbeing - which may reduce their reliance on GPs. These positive outcomes were only achieved when patients, GPs and healthcare managers were clear about the value of social prescribing schemes and when link workers had sufficient time and resources to form a connection with patients, with the voluntary/community sector and with healthcare staff.

Participatory arts, sport, physical activity and loneliness: the role of space and place

WHAT WORKS CENTRE FOR WELLBEING
2020

This briefing summarises the key findings from a qualitative evidence review into the role of place and space in enhancing wellbeing or alleviating loneliness when taking part in participatory arts and sport or physical activity. The review identified five key themes in the evidence base which highlight processes by which participatory arts and sport increase wellbeing and/ or reduce loneliness. They are: belonging and identity; relationships to community and locality; therapeutic and sensory spaces; safe spaces; and pace and rhythm of a space and place. The briefing concludes by suggesting how the evidence could be implemented.

A qualitative evidence review of place and space, intangible assets and volunteering and participatory arts and sport or physical activity for enhancing wellbeing or alleviating loneliness across the adult lifecourse (16+ years)

MANSFIELD Louise, et al
2020

This review identifies evidence on the role of place and space in enhancing wellbeing or alleviating loneliness when taking part in participatory arts and sport or physical activity. The review looked at studies published worldwide between 2009 and 2019, found 59 sources. The qualitative studies included focus on understanding and conceptualising place and space, wellbeing and/or loneliness in participatory arts, sport or physical activity. In these studies, five key thematic areas and their findings have been identified: (i) belonging and identity in place and space (ii) places and spaces of community and locality, (iii) therapeutic and sensory spaces, (iv) safe spaces and (v) temporal aspects of place and space. These themes point to processes by which participatory arts and sport operate to enhance wellbeing and/or alleviate loneliness. Based on the findings, the review has high confidence that places and spaces and placemaking are important in enhancing wellbeing and potentially alleviating loneliness by creating a positive sense of belonging and identity, community and therapeutic or sensory experience in participatory arts, sport or physical activity. It has moderate confidence that places and spaces and placemaking are important in enhancing wellbeing by creating safe spaces for those facing physical or emotional harm via participatory arts, sport or physical activity. It has moderate confidence that the pattern and timing of activities in places and spaces for participatory arts, sport or physical activity i.e. when, how long, who with and what types of activity occur, have a positive influence of wellbeing.

Social prescribing evidence map: summary report

PRICE Sian, HOOKWAY Amy, KING Sian
2017

Summary findings from an evidence mapping to share evidence on the effectiveness and practice of social prescribing to improve the health and well-being of individuals with social, emotional or practical needs. Sixty-two sources met the inclusion criteria for the evidence map. Two main types of social prescribing were identified. Those targeting psychosocial needs and those intended for people who are sedentary and/or overweight or obese. In total six types of social prescribing initiative are described: link worker programmes (schemes linking people to a facilitator who assessed them and referred them on to community support); community arts programmes; a horticultural programme; exercise referral schemes; commercial weight loss programmes and referral to welfare rights advice. The evidence mapping aims to support professionals looking to implement social prescribing interventions within primary and community care settings across Wales

Older people and social isolation: a review of the evidence

KINSELLA Sarah
2015

A review of the current literature and evidence on effective interventions to tackle social isolation amongst older people. Based on the findings from the review, the report recommends that: interventions should be targeted at those most at-risk; base their activities on the evidence of what works; and focus on providing group activities, particularly those which have an arts, educational learning or social focus and are participatory. It also recommends exploring the use of using new technologies, such as the internet and Skype.

Results 1 - 10 of 55

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News

Prevention in social care

Prevention in social care What it means, the policy context, role for commissioners and practitioners and the evidence base.

H4All wellbeing service

H4All wellbeing service Practice example about how H4All Wellbeing Service is using the Patient Activation Measure (PAM) tool

Moving Memory

Moving Memory Practice example about how the Moving Memory Dance Theatre Company is challenging perceived notions of age and ageing.

Chatty Cafe Scheme

Chatty Cafe Scheme Practice example about how the Chatty Cafe Scheme is helping to tackle loneliness by bringing people of all ages together

Oomph! Wellness

Oomph! Wellness Practice example about how Oomph! Wellness is supporting staff to get older adults active and combat growing levels of social isolation

LAUGH research project

LAUGH research project Practice example about a research project to develop highly personalised, playful objects for people with advanced dementia

KOMP

KOMP Practice example about how KOMP, designed by No Isolation is helping older people stay connected with their families
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