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Results for 'local authorities'

Results 1 - 10 of 61

Social determinants of health and the role of local government

LOCAL GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION
2020

This report explores what local government can do to improve health especially by tackling social determinants. Health improvement has always been a fundamental responsibility of local government and this was emphasised further with the transfer of public health responsibilities in 2013. The report argues that there is little use in simply treating people for a health condition if the cause of that condition is not also addressed. Tackling social determinants includes improvements in housing, education and employment as well as ensuring a health promoting environment. Each of the social determinants of health can be improved to give an overall improvement in the health and wellbeing of communities. The roles that local government undertakes to improve health through tackling social determinants include: civic leadership; as employer and anchor institution; securing services; planning and licensing; as champion of prevention. Local government actions and services are centred around the improvement of wellbeing and the prevention of poor outcomes – this is true for children’s services, adult social care and economic development among many others. Opportunities for health improvement by tackling the social determinants of health have been taken up across the country – the report includes detailed examples and case studies illustrating the opportunities for health improvement and what has already been achieved.

Loneliness, social isolation and COVID-19: practical advice

LOCAL GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION, ASSOCIATION OF DIRECTORS OF PUBLIC HEALTH
2020

This briefing provides advice for Directors of Public Health and those leading the response to loneliness and social isolation issues arising from the COVID-19 pandemic. The advice highlights the importance in intervening early to tackle loneliness and social isolation to prevent more costly health and care needs from developing, as well as helping community resilience and recovery. This can only be done at the local level through partnerships, with councils playing a role, as they own most of the assets where community action could or should take place, such as parks, libraries and schools. A table summarises the main risk factors of loneliness and social isolation, including those specific to COVID-19. It then briefly sets out councils’ role in working with partners and using community assets to address and help prevent loneliness and social isolation; looks at the steps councils were taking prior to the pandemic; and the changes that may be needed as a result of COVID-19 and opportunities to embed positive changes, such as greater awareness about the impact of personal behaviours on mental wellbeing.

Handyperson services: defining the added value

FOUNDATIONS
2020

This report highlights the role of Handyperson Services in keeping people safe and healthy in their own homes. It looks at some of the main improvements services can carry out, which can include repairs, home safety checks and home adaptations. It also provides examples of services that provide added value. These include: Middlesbrough Staying Put, County Durham Handyperson Service and Manchester Care & Repair. Figures from a sample survey completed by 78 local authorities in England show that over half of local authorities either provide or commission handyperson services, with 45 percent providing services that aid timely discharge from hospital. The report concludes that the inclusion of Disabled Facilities Grant in the Better Care Fund provides a mechanism to improve the commissioning and targeting of Handyperson Services.

Cost-effectiveness of telecare for people with social care needs: the Whole Systems Demonstrator cluster randomised trial

HENDERSON Catherine, et al
2014

Purpose of the study: to examine the costs and cost-effectiveness of ‘second-generation’ telecare, in addition to standard support and care that could include ‘first-generation’ forms of telecare, compared with standard support and care that could include ‘first-generation’ forms of telecare. Design and methods: a pragmatic cluster-randomised controlled trial with nested economic evaluation. A total of 2,600 people with social care needs participated in a trial of community-based telecare in three English local authority areas. In the Whole Systems Demonstrator Telecare Questionnaire Study, 550 participants were randomised to intervention and 639 to control. Participants who were offered the telecare intervention received a package of equipment and monitoring services for 12 months, additional to their standard health and social care services. The control group received usual health and social care. Primary outcome measure: incremental cost per quality-adjusted life year (QALY) gained. The analyses took a health and social care perspective. Results: cost per additional QALY was £297,000. Cost-effectiveness acceptability curves indicated that the probability of cost-effectiveness at a willingness-to-pay of £30,000 per QALY gained was only 16%. Sensitivity analyses combining variations in equipment price and support cost parameters yielded a cost-effectiveness ratio of £161,000 per QALY. Implications: while QALY gain in the intervention group was similar to that for controls, social and health services costs were higher. Second-generation telecare did not appear to be a cost-effective addition to usual care, assuming a commonly accepted willingness to pay for QALYs.

Evaluating social care prevention in England: challenges and opportunities

MARCZAK Joanna, WISTOW Gerald, FERNANDEZ Jose-Luis
2019

Context: The Care Act 2014 placed a statutory duty on adult social care (ASC) to prevent and delay the development of needs for care and support. There is little clarity about how to translate this national obligation into effective local practice. Objectives: This exploratory study sought to lay the foundations for understanding approaches to this new duty by identifying: emerging local understandings of prevention; associated implementation strate­gies; and the potential for designing evaluation frameworks. Methods: Local perspectives were secured through: in-depth interviews in six English local authorities; reviews of local strategy, implementation documents and reviews of data sources; and methods for evaluating local initiatives in sampled authorities. Findings: The findings indicate important differences between and within local authorities in conceptuali­sations of prevention. Although willingness to commission services was strongly linked to the availability of evidence on what works in prevention, council conducted limited local evaluations. This study also found limited collaboration between ASC and Health in developing joint prevention approaches, in part due to differ­ences in conceptualisation and also constraints arising from different priorities and information systems. Limitations: The exploratory nature of the study and the small sample size limits the generalisability of its findings. Overall, the number of local authorities and respondents allowed us to explore a range of local views, opinions and practices related to the prevention agenda in a variety of contexts, however the findings are not generalisable to all English local authorities. Implications: This study suggests that the limited local evidence about prevention, combined with finan­cial austerity, may lead to disproportionate investment in a small number of interventions where existing evidence suggests cost-savings potential, which, in turn, may impact authorities’ ability to fulfil their statutory duties related to preventing and delaying the needs for care and support. In this connection, this study highlights the potential for developing local evaluation strategies utilising existing but largely unexploited local administrative data collections.

Evidence, insight, or intuition? Investment decisions in the commissioning of prevention services for older people

MILLER Robin, et al
2013

English adult social care commissioners are expected to make ‘evidence based’ decisions on how best to invest public sector funding. This study explores the types of evidence that commissioners use in relation to prevention services for older people and the other factors that influence their investment decisions. A study of local authority Directors of Adult Social Services (DASSs) was used to identify three local prevention interventions. Semi-structured interviews with leads for these interventions explored the evidence and other factors that influenced the investment process. Commissioners drew on a variety of published evidence, in particular that deriving from central government and its regional representative bodies, and third sector organizations with specialist knowledge. Local evidence was also generated through the undertaking of pilots and gathering of performance data. Alongside these ‘rational’ decision-making processes were strong political, personal, and relational dimensions related primarily to the influence of elected members and the hierarchical power of DASSs. Capturing experiential evidence and knowledge of service users and frontline practitioners, being clear about expected impacts and monitoring accordingly, and using recognized evaluation tools would provide further local evidence and enable better comparison and sharing across local authorities.

Reaching out: guide to helping principal and local councils tackle loneliness

LOCAL GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF LOCAL COUNCILS
2019

A practical guide to help principal authorities and local councils to work together to tackle loneliness. The guide outlines the current loneliness policy context and uses a range of case studies to demonstrate effective models working in practice. It highlights four ways in which loneliness can be tackled at a local level: finding ways to reach and understand the needs of those experiencing loneliness; providing services that directly improve the number and quality of relationships that people have; providing support such as transport and technology to help sustain connections; and providing the right environment by creating the right structures and conditions locally to support those affected by, or at risk of, loneliness. Case studies include schemes to tackle loneliness and isolation in rural communities; older people's lunch clubs; supporting socially isolated adults and using tablet computers and video conferencing; and a model of Enhanced Primary Care. The guide includes useful check lists, advice on how to measure and evaluate outputs, and links to additional resources.

The lives we want to lead: the LGA green paper for adult social care and wellbeing

LOCAL GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION
2018

A consultation paper from the Local Government Association, which seeks views on the future of care and support for adults and their unpaid carers. The paper puts forward options to secure the immediate and long-term funding for adult social care, and makes the case for a shift towards preventative, community-based personalised care, which helps maximise people's health, wellbeing and independence. It also considers the importance of housing, public health, other council services, in supporting wellbeing and prevention. Sections cover: differing views about the future of long-term funding for social care; the wider changes needed across care and health to bring out a greater focus on community-based and person-centred prevention; the role of public health and wider council services in supporting and improving wellbeing; and the nature of the relationship between social care and health, integration, accountability and how the new NHS funding could be used for maximum impact. Thirty consultation questions are included throughout the report. The consultation will run until 26 September 2018.

The 'front door' to adult social care

AUDITOR GENERAL FOR WALES
2019

To meet the aims of the Social Services and Well-being (Wales) Act 2014, local authorities need to have created a comprehensive ‘front door’ to social care and to have in places an effective Information, Advice and Assistance (IAA) service. This audit report considers the effectiveness of IAA services in Wales, the availability of preventative and community-based support, and the systems put in place to ensure those who need care and support or are at risk are identified and helped. It also considers the impact of the front door on demand for social care and in respect of improving wellbeing. Although local authorities are supporting people to access a wider range of support options, there is a lack of comprehensive understanding of what is available and the preventative services that are needed. It also found that carers are still not getting equal access to the services they need. Based on the findings, the report concludes that councils are preventing social-care demand, but there is variation in the availability, accessibility and quality of information, advice and assistance services. It makes recommendations to help improve access to information, advice and assistance services.

Disabled Facilities Grant (DFG) and other adaptations: external review

MACKINTOSH Shelia, et al
2018

This review, commissioned by the Department of Health and Social Care, looks at how the Disabled Facilities Grant (DFG) currently operates and makes evidence based recommendations for how it should change in the future. It review aims to develop more effective ways of supporting more people to live in suitable housing so they can stay independent for longer and makes the case for more joint working across housing, health and social care. The focus of the review is on how the disabled or older person can be put at the centre of service provision and what would make it easier for them to access services. It also looks at the role of DFG in prevention and how it can deliver this more effectively. It draws on a range of evidence, including: analysis of data from LOGASnet returns; consultation events attended by local authorities and home improvement agencies; interviews with staff from selected local authorities; and a short review of the academic, policy and practice literature. The conclusions and recommendations include: renaming the grant to reflect that it is part of a broader set interventions to help people remain independent; improved integration of services; better partnership working between health and care and different professions; raising the upper limit of the grant; and changes to the current formula for allocating funding; and updating of the existing means testing regulations. The review also identifies additional research to be carried out.

Results 1 - 10 of 61

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News

Moving Memory

Moving Memory Practice example about how the Moving Memory Dance Theatre Company is challenging perceived notions of age and ageing.

Chatty Cafe Scheme

Chatty Cafe Scheme Practice example about how the Chatty Cafe Scheme is helping to tackle loneliness by bringing people of all ages together

Oomph! Wellness

Oomph! Wellness Practice example about how Oomph! Wellness is supporting staff to get older adults active and combat growing levels of social isolation

KOMP

KOMP Practice example about how KOMP, designed by No Isolation is helping older people stay connected with their families

LAUGH research project

LAUGH research project Practice example about a research project to develop highly personalised, playful objects for people with advanced dementia
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