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Results for 'loneliness'

Results 1 - 10 of 140

Ageing Better Isle of Wight: final evaluation report

HARFLETT Naomi
2020

Final evaluation report for Ageing Better Isle of Wight – a five-year Programme funded by the National Lottery Community Fund that aimed to make the Isle of Wight a great place to grow older, encourage better relations between generations, and tackle social isolation and loneliness. Over five years of delivery the AB IOW Programme has had a significant impact across a number of areas and generated substantial learning. 16,836 older people participated in 16 projects across all areas of the Island. These included: care navigators; community navigators; alternative transport; Alzheimer cafe; one-to-one creative sessions for people in residential care; care for carers; digital inclusion; education; men in shed; employment support; mental health peer support; good neighbour scheme; older-preneurs; an online directory of local events and services; singing groups. In total, 11 organisations were directly involved in delivery of the Programme and organisations across the voluntary, public and private sectors Island wide were affected by the impact of the work of the projects. Key areas of impact included: reducing social isolation – for an estimated two thirds of participants levels of social isolation were either reduced or maintained; improving wellbeing – there was a statistically significant increase in the mean wellbeing scores of national evaluation questionnaire respondents, and 50% of respondents participating in AB IOW projects experienced an improvement in wellbeing; value for money – analysis of the costs and the benefits of the projects found that in part due to good use of volunteers and existing community facilities, the projects delivered support, advice and interventions at a low unit cost per participant; becoming an Age Friendly Island – AB IOW has had a notable impact on the voluntary, public and private sectors on the IOW.

Evaluation of Ageing Better Isle of Wight

NATIONAL DEVELOPMENT TEAM FOR INCLUSION
2020

Final evaluation report for Ageing Better Isle of Wight – a five-year Programme funded by the National Lottery Community Fund that aimed to make the Isle of Wight a great place to grow older, encourage better relations between generations, and tackle social isolation and loneliness. Over five years of delivery the AB IOW Programme has had a significant impact across a number of areas and generated substantial learning. 16,836 older people participated in 16 projects across all areas of the Island. These included: care navigators; community navigators; alternative transport; Alzheimer cafe; one-to-one creative sessions for people in residential care; care for carers; digital inclusion; education; men in shed; employment support; mental health peer support; good neighbour scheme; older-preneurs; an online directory of local events and services; singing groups. In total, 11 organisations were directly involved in delivery of the Programme and organisations across the voluntary, public and private sectors Island wide were affected by the impact of the work of the projects. Key areas of impact included: reducing social isolation – for an estimated two thirds of participants levels of social isolation were either reduced or maintained; improving wellbeing – there was a statistically significant increase in the mean wellbeing scores of national evaluation questionnaire respondents, and 50% of respondents participating in AB IOW projects experienced an improvement in wellbeing; value for money – analysis of the costs and the benefits of the projects found that in part due to good use of volunteers and existing community facilities, the projects delivered support, advice and interventions at a low unit cost per participant; becoming an Age Friendly Island – AB IOW has had a notable impact on the voluntary, public and private sectors on the IOW.

Telephone befriending: a valuable service during lockdown

HEALTHWATCH ENFIELD
2020

This report gives a brief overview of the telephone befriending scheme set up in the London Borough of Enfield during the Coronavirus pandemic and a snapshot of issues raised by residents identified as being vulnerable or at risk. Overall, Healthwatch Enfield volunteers made 413 telephone befriending calls during this period. The main issue raised by participants was the impact of social isolation on health and wellbeing including mental health issues, with those residents with ongoing health needs being particularly concerned. Recipients appreciated food parcels and medicines delivery but also valued the support of family and neighbours. Most of the recipients were pleased to receive the calls and a core continued to receive these throughout the period. The report suggests that the scheme should be continued if people request it, with established organisations being asked to support the calls. If or when a second wave arises, arrangements should be made to re-establish the full service.

Helping to tackle loneliness through open data on local services: research report

LOCAL GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION
2020

This document sets out the findings and emerging recommendations from a project to explore how better management of data can provide a more reliable, more trusted, more accessible and more extensive set of information about local activities, services and support to tackle loneliness. From June 2019 to March 2020, three pilot areas, Elmbridge District Council, Hull City Council and Blackburn with Darwen Council, have been investigating efficient ways of collecting information, exploring how a range of stakeholders can play a role in capturing data and helping keep it up to date and testing and refining underpinning data standards and taxonomies. Section two of this report sets out the issues that exist and the benefits that can be achieved through improving how information is managed locally. Section three introduces the pilots and then relays some of the related experiences and decisions in the course of their involvement. Section four provides summary learning through a maturity model and a broad range of issues, barriers and lessons learned. Section five sets out an outline plan and provides some understanding of the costs and resources that may need to be in place. Section six introduces the technical considerations. The report makes a number of recommendations, calling on place-based leaders to champion the importance and the value of accurate and reliable information about local services in supporting the success of critical initiatives such as social prescribing; and on local partners to work collaboratively and adopt the Open Referral UK standard that has been developed in partnership with the Open Data Community.

Supporting access to activities to enhance well‐being and reduce social isolation in people living with motor neurone disease

SIMPSON Suzanne, et al
2020

Purpose: People living with Motor Neurone Disease (plwMND) have emphasised the importance of psychological support and well‐being in helping them manage their condition. Social prescribing is a formal process of referring patients with largely socioeconomic and psychosocial issues to a link worker to co‐design a plan to improve their health and well‐being. Intervention involves supporting engagement in meaningful activities based within the individual's local community. This pilot project aimed to explore the application of social prescribing with plwMND. Methods: A cohort of plwMND were supported by an occupational therapist and link worker to identify and access community‐based activities. Qualitative interviews were completed post‐intervention with the plwMND and the link workers. Findings were analysed using thematic analysis. Results: A total of nine plwMND took part in this pilot service, and five plwMND and four link workers were interviewed. PlwMND valued participation and wanted to engage in community‐based activities. Those with mild symptomatology were able to access activities and reported a positive impact on their well‐being. Those with more complex needs, particularly reduced mobility, experienced significant barriers to participation. Barriers included transport, equipment provision, lack of company to support participation and lack of confidence using mobility aids in a community environment. Link workers valued joint working with an occupational therapist. Conclusion: Social prescribing aims to address the health inequalities of those living with long‐term conditions, although currently it likely excludes plwMND. Future work needs to quantitatively evaluate the effects of the service on the well‐being of plwMND.

Promising approaches revisited: effective action on loneliness in later life

JOPLING Kate
2020

Drawing on the expertise and experience of leading figures in the field, academic literature and other evidence, this report presents an update to an earlier framework for loneliness interventions published in 2015. The framework helps to make sense of the different ways we can address loneliness, and explains how these approaches fit together to create an effective community response. The guide offers examples of these approaches in action so that organisations can find inspiration from others. The new guide learns the lessons of the last five years – as well as the impact of the pandemic and how organisations tackling loneliness have adapted. Its key message is that to tackle loneliness, different types of support need to be in place. People need to have the infrastructure to engage in social life, whether that is about digital, transport or a built environment that supports social life. Finally, there are direct ways of reducing loneliness whether that is one-to-one or in groups, or psychological support. A key change to the framework is the addition of the built environment as part of the ‘gateway infrastructure’ that helps tackle loneliness, recognising the role shops, cafes and pubs play as places to meet.

Tackling loneliness

BELLIS Alexander, LOFT Philip
2020

This briefing examines the Government loneliness strategy ‘A connected society: a strategy for tackling loneliness – laying the foundations for change’ and the steps taken so far by the Government. The strategy set out a wide variety of cross-departmental measures that the Government would take to provide 'national leadership' to tackle loneliness in England. The paper focuses in particular on progress made in relation to social prescribing; community infrastructure – housing, community spaces, transport, digital inclusion, arts, culture and leisure; and targeted support. The briefing also looks at research into the causes and impact of loneliness and possible interventions. The impact of the Covid-19 pandemic on loneliness is also considered, alongside the measures introduced by the Government in response. Finally, this paper briefly outlines the situation in Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland.

Connecting communities: a qualitative investigation of the challenges in delivering a national social prescribing service to reduce loneliness

HOLDING Eleanor, et al
2020

Loneliness is a global public health concern linked to a range of negative health outcomes (Cacioppo & Cacioppo, 2018. The Lancet. 391(10119), 426). Internationally, this has led to the development of a number of interventions, but these are rarely implemented or evaluated on a large scale. This paper is one of the first of its kind to describe elements of an evaluation of a large‐scale national social prescribing scheme to reduce loneliness, deploying individual link workers to signpost people to community activities. Reporting on findings from interviews with staff (n = 25 of which 6 were repeat interviews) and volunteers (n = 9) between October 2017 and December 2018 in localities across the United Kingdom. We reflect on the complexities of the link worker role, the challenges of service delivery and the importance of community infrastructure. There was evidence that highly skilled link workers who had developed positive relationships with providers and service‐users were key to the success of the intervention. As well as providing an effective liaison and signposting function, successful link workers tailored the national programme to local need to proactively address specific gaps in existing service provision. For social prescribing services to be successful and sustainable, commissioners must consider additional funding of community infrastructure.

Social prescribing

EATON Matthew
2020

This paper details the development of social prescribing policies in England and provides an overview of schemes in the devolved nations. Social prescribing is a means for GPs and other healthcare professionals to refer patients via a link worker to non-clinical services in the local community. Link workers help people to understand the underlying issues affecting their health and wellbeing and work with them to co-produce a personalised care and support plan. People can take up a range of activities and services including the arts, nature-based activities, physical activity classes and counselling. This briefing examines the background and path to social prescribing, looking at key initiatives and reports; Government policy; the benefits of social prescribing; and social prescribing in the devolved nations.

Promising approaches revisited: supplementary case studies

JOPLING Kate
2020

This supplement is a companion piece to the report Promising Approaches Revisited: Effective action on loneliness in later life. That report sets out the different elements needed for effective action to reduce loneliness. These case studies show the framework in action, illustrating how each element may work in practice. They cover: connectors services, including social prescribing; direct solution including group-based interventions and one-to-one approaches; gateway infrastructure such as digital technology and the built environment; and neighbourhood approaches.

Results 1 - 10 of 140

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News

Moving Memory

Moving Memory Practice example about how the Moving Memory Dance Theatre Company is challenging perceived notions of age and ageing.

Chatty Cafe Scheme

Chatty Cafe Scheme Practice example about how the Chatty Cafe Scheme is helping to tackle loneliness by bringing people of all ages together

Oomph! Wellness

Oomph! Wellness Practice example about how Oomph! Wellness is supporting staff to get older adults active and combat growing levels of social isolation

KOMP

KOMP Practice example about how KOMP, designed by No Isolation is helping older people stay connected with their families

LAUGH research project

LAUGH research project Practice example about a research project to develop highly personalised, playful objects for people with advanced dementia
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