#EXCLUDE#
#EXCLUDE#

Find prevention records by subject or service provider/commissioner name

  • Key to icons

    • Journal Prevention service example
    • Book Book
    • Digital media Digital media
    • Journal Journal article
    • Free resource Free resource

Results for 'loneliness'

Results 1 - 10 of 97

Call&Check: a community service which disrupts the norm

DICKINSON Joe
2019

In this project presentation the author, inventor of Call&Check UK, describes the service which is designed to enable people to live independently and confidently in their own homes. Regular visits are made by a postman/postal operator and who asks five short questions to find out how the recipient is and if there is anything they need. Call&Check works not only for older people in communities but for many others who need that little extra support to live at home.

Agents for change: an evaluation of the Somerset Village Agents programme

COMMUNITY COUNCIL FOR SOMERSET
2017

An evaluation of the Somerset Village Agents programme, which aims to reduce isolation and help connect excluded and vulnerable people with services that support them to improve their independence, health and wellbeing. It uses locally based staff who act as first point of contact for people needing information and support. The evaluation, undertaken jointly by South West Forum and Clarity CiC with support from University of Gloucestershire, included analysis of client data, interviews with clients and discussions with locally based staff. Analysis was carried out between October 2016 and February 2017. The results of the evaluation found that the Somerset Village Agents programme is highly regarded by clients, statutory agencies and voluntary and public organisations who have a connection with the programme. It is also helping the most isolated, lonely and vulnerable people in the community, especially older people and those with disabilities and/or long-term health conditions. Areas for potential improvement identified by the evaluation included expanding reach of the programme to reach more younger people and more work to build community capacity. A cost benefit analysis of the programme estimates that for the 21-month period reviewed the Village Agents programme cost £646,000 to deliver and generated £2.5 million in direct savings to the state and a further £2.74 million in wider social value. The report makes recommendations for the future development of the programme.

Ringing the changes: the role of telephone communication in a helpline and befriending service targeting loneliness in older people

PRESTON Claire, MOORE Stephen
2019

The drive to deliver services addressing loneliness in older people by telephone and online makes it increasingly relevant to consider how the mode of communication affects the way people interact with services and the capacity of services to meet their needs. This paper is based on the qualitative strand of a larger mixed-methods study of a national phoneline tackling loneliness in older people in the United Kingdom. The research comprised thematic analysis of four focus groups with staff and 42 semi-structured interviews with callers. It explored the associations between telephone-delivery, how individuals used the services and how the services were able to respond. To understand these associations, it was useful to identify some constituent characteristics of telephone communication in this context: namely its availability, reach and non-visual nature. This enabled various insights and comparison with other communication media. For example, the availability of the services attracted people seeking frequent emotional support but this presented challenges to staff. More positively, the ability of the services to connect disparate individuals enabled them to form different kinds of satisfying relationships. The evolution of mixed communication forms, such as internet-based voice communication and smartphone-based visual communication, makes analysis at the level of a technology's characteristics useful. Such a cross-cutting perspective can inform both the design of interventions and assessment of their suitability for different manifestations of loneliness.

Bringing people together: how community action can tackle loneliness and social isolation

ANDERSON Zoe, et al
2019

Learning and examples from a range of community and voluntary sector projects tackling social isolation and loneliness in the UK. Drawing on the work of charities, the report considers the causes of loneliness, looks at 'what works' to prevent it and suggests ways to offer support to those who are isolated or lonely. Preventative initiatives include giving something back through volunteering, helping people to take on new interests, and investing in community spaces to help people share interests together. Examples to support those who are lonely or isolated include giving people choices in how to get involved and to make steps manageable, simple solutions such as befriending and peer support, tailoring solutions for different age groups, and using technology such as such as social media and computer tablets to widen access to support. The report shows that supporting people to improve their mindset, building new connections with others, building confidence and developing a new sense of purpose, can have a big impact in reducing feelings of loneliness and isolation. The report is based on interviews with funded organisations and staff in The National Lottery Community Fund staff.

Social, economic and health impacts of WaveLength's work with loneliness and isolation

IRVINE Annie
2015

The findings of a small qualitative research to understand the ways media technology such as radio, TV and tablet computers can contribute to reducing loneliness and social isolation among vulnerable groups. Specifically, the research aimed to understand what differences the technologies provided by the charity WaveLength make in different areas of people’s lives, including emotional, social, economic and health. The study carried out interviews with 11 organisations and 14 individual beneficiaries who had received equipment from WaveLength. A further 16 people took part in face-to-face group discussions with 16 participants. The positive impacts of media technology described by participants fell into three broad categories: alleviating the subjective experience of loneliness and associated negative emotions; reducing social isolation by bringing people into ‘real world’ contact with others; and a broad range of other benefits in areas including: information and interest emotional wellbeing and mental health; physical health; and economic and educational impacts. The findings show that media technology could have positive impacts both in alleviating the negative subjective experience of loneliness at times when people were physically alone and also in reducing more objective social isolation by bringing individuals into greater contact with others.

Everyday technology fighting loneliness

WAVELENGTH, UNIVERSITY OF YORK
2019

Summary findings from research co-produced by the University of York and the charity Wavelength, which suggests that people feel less lonely when they have access to everyday technology such as a radio, television or tablet. The research looked at data collected from 445 people over two years. It found that people who received technology saw a statistically significant reduction in emotional and social loneliness. It also found that they rated their health more positively after being given new technology. The study participants had an average age of 44 and over half had been homeless and experienced poor mental health. The report calls on policy makers to make funding available so that vulnerable people can purchase everyday technology and for free access to a minimum standard of broadband in order to connect greater numbers of people via smart televisions and tablet computers.

Review of key mechanisms in intergenerational practices, and their effectiveness at reducing loneliness/social isolation

BRYER Nia, OWNES Janine
2019

This review examines enablers and barriers to successful intergenerational activities and interventions effectiveness at reducing loneliness and social isolation. It also examines whether there are particular subgroups for whom intergenerational programmes are particularly effective. The review was carried out by researchers at OB3 Research and the Centre for Loneliness Studies at University of Sheffield. It included a literature review, and field work to identify intergenerational interventions and case studies from Wales and the wider UK. The review identified a range of interventions from low level interventions such as raising awareness of ageing issues through to high level intervention where intergenerational activities are embedded into community settings. The findings also indicate that intergenerational practice does more to reduce social isolation and lack of social connections than loneliness. The review identified different benefits for the three groups involved - children/young people, adults and older people. The review also identified a number of enablers that contribute to effective operation of IP (e.g. a visionary leader, a focused perspective) and barriers that hinder action (e.g. time, planning, logistics). The review makes eight recommendations for the Welsh Government to consider in terms of future policy relating to intergenerational practice.

An evaluation of Wolverhampton's social prescribing service: a new route to wellbeing

MASSIE Rachel, AHMAD Nahid
2019

An independent evaluation of Wolverhampton social prescribing pilot service, which was launched in 2017 by the Clinical Commissioning Group in collaboration with Wolverhampton Voluntary Sector Council. The evaluation found that the service, which provides a link between primary care services and voluntary and community organisations for those with non-clinical issues, is highly regarded. A total of 676 referrals were received between May 2017 and December 2018. The most common reasons for referral were loneliness and low-level mental health conditions. Link workers made onward referrals to over 150 groups and services. Participants reported a positive impact on mental health, wellbeing, confidence, self-esteem, and even physical health for those who had been referred. The report estimates that Return on Investment means that for every £1 spent on the social prescribing intervention, there will be a saving of £0.15 for primary care services. The researchers recommended further awareness-raising activities, quarterly progress reports and better communication to service users around the nature of the service and wider access, as well as improved data capture.

Addressing older men's experiences of loneliness and social isolation in later life

WILLIS Paul, et al
2019

A report summarising the key findings from a two-year study to explore how older men from different backgrounds stay socially connected and combat loneliness and social isolation. A total of 111 men aged 65+ from five different groups took part in interviews. The groups were: men who are single or living alone; men living rural areas; men caring for partners; gay men who live alone; and men living with hearing loss. The finding identify variations in experiences of loneliness and social isolation across different groups. Other key findings show that men valued groups that tried to increase social opportunities and interaction; they particularly valued mixed-age groups, and groups that facilitated emotional and social ties with other men. The briefing looks at the implications of the findings for social care, voluntary services, and for policy makers and commissioners of voluntary and community-based service. It calls for greater priority to be given to the long-term resourcing and running of community-groups for older adults. It also recommends there should also be more inclusive, tailored groups for older men in marginalised groups.

Working inclusively to make communities age-friendly: briefing

AMBITION FOR AGEING
2019

This briefing paper looks at how to design effective and inclusive ways of working to reach more older people in minority or marginalised communities. It argues that equality, diversity and inclusivity are central to understanding and reducing social isolation, and looks at key ways to embed inclusion in building age-friendly communities. These include: having a good understanding of communities themselves; designing genuinely inclusive opportunities, as well delivering targeted approaches; and working with an equalities mindset. The briefing draws on learning from research and reflection by the Ambition for Ageing Equalities Board. This briefing will be of interest to those working to tackle loneliness and social isolation of older people from marginalised communities, and those concerned that community and neighbourhood-level work reaches people in marginalised communities.

Results 1 - 10 of 97

#EXCLUDE#
News

Moving Memory

Moving Memory Practice example about how the Moving Memory Dance Theatre Company is challenging perceived notions of age and ageing.

Chatty Cafe Scheme

Chatty Cafe Scheme Practice example about how the Chatty Cafe Scheme is helping to tackle loneliness by bringing people of all ages together

Oomph! Wellness

Oomph! Wellness Practice example about how Oomph! Wellness is supporting staff to get older adults active and combat growing levels of social isolation

KOMP

KOMP Practice example about how KOMP, designed by No Isolation is helping older people stay connected with their families

LAUGH research project

LAUGH research project Practice example about a research project to develop highly personalised, playful objects for people with advanced dementia
View more: News
Related SCIE content
Related external content
Visit Social Care Online, the UK’s largest database of information and research on all aspects of social care and social work.
SEARCH NOW
Submit prevention service example
SUBMIT
What do you think about SCIE's work?
FEEDBACK
#EXCLUDE#
#EXCLUDE#