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Results for 'long term conditions'

Results 1 - 10 of 32

ConnectWELL

ConnectWELL

Introducing ConnectWELL - a social prescribing service – initially funded and piloted in 2014 by NHS Rugby CCG, which aims to improve health and wellbeing for patients and clients. ConnectWELL provides Health Professionals with just one, straightforward referral route to the many Voluntary and Community Sector organisations, groups and activities that can address underlying societal causes, manage or prevent compounding factors of ill-health. ConnectWELL has over 900 organisations and activities, ranging from Carers’ support, community groups, disability services, Faith / Religious / Cultural Activities, Housing / Homelessness Support, Mentoring, Music Groups, and volunteering opportunities.

Effects of participating in community assets on quality of life and costs of care: longitudinal cohort study of older people in England

MUNFORD Luke Aaron, et al
2020

Objectives: Improving outcomes for older people with long-term conditions and multimorbidity is a priority. Current policy commits to substantial expansion of social prescribing to community assets, such as charity, voluntary or community groups. This study uses longitudinal data to add to the limited evidence on whether this is associated with better quality of life or lower costs of care. Design: Prospective 18-month cohort survey of self-reported participation in community assets and quality of life linked to administrative care records. Effects of starting and stopping participation estimated using double-robust estimation. Setting: Participation in community asset facilities. Costs of primary and secondary care. Participants 4377 older people with long-term conditions. Intervention Participation in community assets. Primary and secondary outcome measures Quality-adjusted life years (QALYs), healthcare costs and social value estimated using net benefits. Results: Starting to participate in community assets was associated with a 0.017 (95% CI 0.002 to 0.032) gain in QALYs after 6 months, 0.030 (95% CI 0.005 to 0.054) after 12 months and 0.056 (95% CI 0.017 to 0.094) after 18 months. Cumulative effects on care costs were negative in each time period: £−96 (95% CI £−512 to £321) at 6 months; £−283 (95% CI £−926 to £359) at 12 months; and £−453 (95% CI £−1366 to £461) at 18 months. The net benefit of starting to participate was £1956 (95% CI £209 to £3703) per participant at 18 months. Stopping participation was associated with larger negative impacts of −0.102 (95% CI −0.173 to −0.031) QALYs and £1335.33 (95% CI £112.85 to £2557.81) higher costs after 18 months. Conclusions: Participation in community assets by older people with long-term conditions is associated with improved quality of life and reduced costs of care. Sustaining that participation is important because there are considerable health changes associated with stopping. The results support the inclusion of community assets as part of an integrated care model for older patients.

Quality and cost-effectiveness in long-term care and dependency prevention: the English policy landscape. CEQUA report

MARCZAK Joanna, FERNANDEZ Jose-Luis, WITTENBERG Raphael
2017

This report summarises policy developments in England in relation to quality and cost-effectiveness and dependency prevention in long-term care. These policy aims focus on maximising the cost-effectiveness of the social care system, so that service users’ and carers’ quality of life is maximised within available resources. The report provides an overview of the long-term care system in England. It then reviews key recent policy developments in four areas: reducing dependency cost-effectively; strategies for maximising care coordination; supporting unpaid carers; and use of innovative care models, with a focus on technological solutions and personalisation. An appendix lists key features of the Care Act 2014 and the Better Care Fund relevant to prevention.

The impact of telehealth on use of hospital care and mortality: research summary

STEVENTON Adam, BARDSLEY Martin
2012

The impact of telehealth on hospital use, patient admission and mortality were evaluated in three trial sites in England. The sites were from the Department of Health’s Whole System Demonstrator pilots. The evaluation focused on the use of telehealth to people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, diabetes or heart failure. It used a large randomised controlled trial which included over 3,000 participants (1,584 control and 1,570 intervention) in which groups of patients either received the telehealth intervention or acted as controls by receiving their usual care. Statistically significant differences in rates of emergency hospital admission and mortality were found during the twelve months of the trial between control and intervention groups. For intervention patients, the overall costs of hospital care (including emergency admissions, elective admissions and outpatient attendances) were £188 per patient less than those for controls. However, this cost difference was not statistically significant. As well as summarising the main findings the research summary highlights the limitations of the research and other issues that need to be considered in relation to the findings.

A systematic review of the benefits of home telecare for frail elderly people and those with long-term conditions

BARLOW James, et al
2007

This systematic review of 68 randomised controlled trials and 30 large scale observational studies, two-thirds from the USA and 10% from the UK, finds that the most effective telecare interventions appear to be automated vital signs monitoring (for reducing health service use) and telephone follow-up by nurses (for improving clinical indicators and reducing health service use). The cost-effectiveness of these interventions is less certain. Far less evidence about mental health conditions, such as dementia or depression, was found than for physical health conditions, such as heart disease and diabetes. In addition, very few studies were found on the effects of home safety and security systems such as fall detectors and alarm systems, despite their widespread use.

Facilitators and barriers to autonomy: a systematic literature review for older adults with physical impairments, living in residential care facilities

van LOON Jolande, et al
2019

Autonomy is important in every stage of life. However, little is known about how autonomy is enhanced for older adults living in residential care facilities (RCFs). This leads to the research question: which facilitators and barriers to autonomy of older adults with physical impairments due to ageing and chronic health conditions living in RCFs are known? The results will be organised according to the framework of person-centred practice, because this is related to autonomy enhancement. To answer the research question, a systematic literature search and review was performed in the electronic databases CINAHL, PsycINFO, PubMed, Social Services Abstracts and Sociological Abstracts. Inclusion and exclusion criteria were derived from the research question. Selected articles were analysed and assessed on quality using the Mixed Methods Appraisal Tool. Facilitators and barriers for autonomy were found and arranged in four themes: characteristics of residents, prerequisites of professional care-givers, care processes between resident and care-giver, and environment of care. The established facilitators and barriers are relational and dynamic. For a better understanding of the facilitators and barriers to autonomy for older adults with physical impairments living in RCFs, a description is based on the 35 included articles. Autonomy is a capacity to influence the environment and make decisions irrespective of having executional autonomy, to live the kind of life someone desires to live in the face of diminishing social, physical and/or cognitive resources and dependency, and it develops in relationships. The results provide an actual overview and lead to a better understanding of barriers and facilitators for the autonomy of older adults with physical impairments in RCFs. For both residents and care-givers, results offer possibilities to sustain and reinforce autonomy. Scientifically, the study creates new knowledge on factors that influence autonomy, which can be used to enhance autonomy.

Wellbeing Service

H4ALL

Hillingdon H4All is a social prescription/wellbeing service that supports patients 65 and over to better manage long term health conditions and social isolation. The service operates as a Community Interest Company (CIC) and is a collaboration between five prominent local third sector charities namely Age UK Hillingdon, Disablement Association Hillingdon (DASH), Harlington Hospice, Hillingdon Carers and Hillingdon Mind and is commissioned by Hillingdon CCG. The service is an augmentation of the former Primary Care Navigator (PCN) project which was managed by Age UK Hillingdon and funded by Hillingdon CCG in 2014. The new service was established in April 2016 and used learning from the former PCN project to provide an enhanced service with the following features:

Evaluation of Hale Community Connectors Social Prescribing Service 2017

DAYSON Chris, LEATHER David
2018

Reports on initial findings of an independent evaluation of the Community Connectors Social Prescribing Service in Bradford, covering the first nine months of the service (March-November 2017). It aims to answer some key questions about the Community Connectors Social Prescribing Service to support future commissioning by the CCG and its partners. The service was commissioned to improve the health, well-being and social connectedness of local people and reduce unplanned and unnecessary demand on primary and secondary health services. The service involves a referral from a GP of patients who could benefit from additional socially focussed support, followed by a home visit from a Community Connector to help identify what services and activities are available. The evaluation shows that a total of 703 local people were referred to the service for support by their GP. The majority of referrals were to address social issues such as anxiety and social isolation, however, a significant proportion of service users were also in poor health with long term conditions. It also identifies positive outcomes in relation to health, mental well-being, trust of people in their community, social connectedness and service users’ ability to self-care. Although too early to assess the impact on demand for primary and secondary care, service users recording up to nine per cent fewer Accident and Emergency and up to seven per cent fewer GP attendances after referral to the service.

Adding extra years to life and extra life to those years: local government guide to healthy ageing

LOCAL GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION
2018

Guide that sets out priority areas for partnership working to improve later life health. The guide focuses on taking a life course approach and developing healthy behaviours and includes practice examples. The eight case studies in the guide provide examples about what can work to reduce the impact of long-term conditions. The case examples cover tackling loneliness and isolation; preventing falls; getting older people active; using lottery funding to boost healthy ageing; an Olympic legacy for older people; extending the NHS Health Checks programme; getting people talking about their health and reshaping the strategy on health ageing.

Tapping the potential: lessons from the Richmond Group's practical collaborative work in Somerset

NEW PHILANTHROPY CAPITAL
2018

This report captures early learning from a project to building meaningful collaboration between the voluntary and statutory sector in Somerset. It is the latest report from the Doing the Right Thing programme, which aimed to achieve better outcomes for people living with long-term health conditions and reduced demand on health and social care services through collaborative design and delivery. The report identifies benefits of collaboration and system change led by the voluntary and community sector. It also highlights some of the challenges around sustainability, measuring outcomes and ensuring involvement of large national charities is inclusive of the wider voluntary sector in a place. Key findings highlight the benefits of coming to collaboration with no pre-conceived ideas about products or providers; that turning an open-ended conversation between the voluntary sector and public bodies into a productive collaboration requires resource; the benefits of bridging organisations, such as the Richmond Group, and people who make it their job to connect divergent cultures, languages, and priorities; and the agility and stability that voluntary sector leadership can offer to place-based collaborations in a changing healthcare landscape. The report also discusses the wider implications of the research, and the issues it raises around health and care transformation, placed-based collaboration, and evidence for complex interventions. The report will be of particular interest to those seeking to improve collaboration and commission services across the health and care system and also provides practical insights into cross-sector collaboration.

Results 1 - 10 of 32

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News

Moving Memory

Moving Memory Practice example about how the Moving Memory Dance Theatre Company is challenging perceived notions of age and ageing.

Chatty Cafe Scheme

Chatty Cafe Scheme Practice example about how the Chatty Cafe Scheme is helping to tackle loneliness by bringing people of all ages together

Oomph! Wellness

Oomph! Wellness Practice example about how Oomph! Wellness is supporting staff to get older adults active and combat growing levels of social isolation

KOMP

KOMP Practice example about how KOMP, designed by No Isolation is helping older people stay connected with their families

LAUGH research project

LAUGH research project Practice example about a research project to develop highly personalised, playful objects for people with advanced dementia
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