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Results for 'markets'

Results 1 - 5 of 5

Assessing social care market and provider sustainability: part A: a guide for local authorities

CORDIS BRIGHT
2015

The Care Act 2014 introduces a regime to oversee the financial stability of the hardest-to-replace care providers, and sets out measures to ensure people’s care is not interrupted if any social care or support providers fail. This guidance aims to help local authorities to fulfil their responsibilities in the event of provider failure by: helping them identify whether the failure of a provider will leave people at risk of being without a means of having their care and support needs met; where there is a risk, identifying those providers who are most important to meeting those needs, and; where the critical or hardest to replace providers are not within the Care Quality Commission Market Oversight Regime, assessing and taking action to reduce the risk of failure or the impact of a failure should one occur. The document begins looking at care markets and providers, introducing a suggested approach to categorising and segmenting care markets, as well as outlining the main reasons for provider failure. It then considers how to identify indicators of market sustainability and how to monitor hard-to-replace providers.

Assessing social care market and provider sustainability: part B: toolkit

CORDIS BRIGHT
2015

Provides a framework to help local authorities implement a test of care market sustainability, and offers insights about when a provider requires further monitoring. Many local authorities have developed highly effective systems for gathering local market intelligence in relation to the part of the market with which they contract for services. This intelligence may be gathered both formally and informally and involve a broad range of approaches. This toolkit is designed to complement such approaches by providing a clear structure for local authorities to consider the totality of the local market, only a proportion of which they will directly contract with. There are five phases to the application of the toolkit: determining local market segmentation; evaluation of external indicators; evaluation of sub market composition indicators; forming a judgement on sustainability and deciding which ‘hard to replace’ providers to monitor; and understanding and monitoring the sustainability of ’hard to replace’ providers.

Assessing social care market and provider sustainability: project report

CORDIS BRIGHT
2015

Summarises the methods and approach, discusses the learning and shares knowledge arising from the ‘Assessing social care market and provider sustainability’ project, which has developed guidance and a toolkit for the Department of Health, the Local Government Association, and the Association of Directors of Adult Social Services. These resources are designed to support implementation of the Care Act 2014 and help local authorities fulfil their responsibilities in the event of a care provider failure.

ADASS budget survey 2015: report

ASSOCIATION OF DIRECTORS OF ADULT SOCIAL SERVICES
2015

An analysis of the state of adult social care finances, providing in-depth intelligence on how adult social care is responding to the twin challenges of meeting increased demand and managing reducing resources. The survey seeks to explore the views of Directors of Adult Social Services across English Local Authorities on how councils are reconciling the growing numbers of people, often with increasingly complex needs, requiring care and support with the significant and sustained reductions in the funding available. The survey data sets out the concerns of councils in making increasingly difficult choices and the attempts to minimise impacts upon front line services. The report suggests that taking the growth in numbers of older and disabled people into account an additional £1.1 billion would be needed to provide the same level of service as last year. The care provision market is becoming increasingly fragile and 56 per cent of directors report that providers are facing financial difficulties. Many local authorities are going to have to pay more if providers are to be able to attract workers as unemployment falls. While directors see increased prevention and integration as their top two areas for savings for this year, next and beyond, many are struggling to balance investment in reducing future demand and costs at a time when budgets to meet existing statutory duties to provide care and support to those most in need are under such pressure. The paper calls upon the Government to urgently ensure that social care funding is protected and aligned with the NHS, including making provision for the social care funding gap alongside the funding gap for the NHS.

COMODAL: COnsumer MODels for Assisted Living: project summary and findings

CONSUMER MODELS FOR ASSISTED LIVING
2015

An evaluation of the 3 year COMODAL (Consumer Models for Assisted Living) project, funded by the Technology Strategy Board, which aims to support the development of a consumer market for electronic assisted living technologies (eALT). The project focuses on those people aged 50-70 who are approaching retirement and older age to gain an in-depth understanding of the barriers to market development and create consumer led business models developed through collaboration with consumers, industry and the third sector. The report focuses on five key strands of the projects: understanding consumer needs; developing solutions and consumer led business models for eALT; development of industry support system for practical implementation of consumer led business models; development of consumer insights guide for industry; and impact, dissemination and exploitation. The report reveals there is a disconnect between industry’s perceptions of what consumers are looking for in the eALT market and that existing businesses in this sector are on the whole set up to serve statutory services rather than consumers. The top three factors that encourage consumers to buy are: believing that a product would really make a difference, a feeling that costs are affordable and worth it, and a belief that the product would make life safer at home.

Results 1 - 5 of 5

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