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Results for 'memory'

Results 1 - 3 of 3

Effect of board game activities on cognitive function improvement among older adults in adult day care centers

CHING-TENG Yao
2019

Stimulating leisure activities are considered as possible protective factors against dementia and cognitive decline in older adults, particularly due to the enhancement of cognitive reserve. This study tested the effectiveness of board game activities improving the cognitive function of older adults in adult day care centres. This was a quasi‐experimental study. A purposive sampling strategy was used to select 82 subjects who were aged 65 and above with intact mental functions and currently residing in adult day care centres. 41 subjects who participated in a selection of 12 board game activities were assigned to the experimental group and 41 subjects who adhered to their ordinary activities were allocated to the control group. Structured questionnaires of the board game programs were used for data collection. The board game programs showed promising effects in the cognitive function of older adults living in adult day care centres. A possible beneficial effect of board game playing on the risk of dementia could be mediated by a less cognitive decline in older adults. Board game activities may benefit the cognitive function of older adults. Incorporating board game activities into social work care may help develop long‐term care into a more diverse, unique and innovative direction.

Precious memories: a randomized controlled trial on the effects of an autobiographical memory intervention delivered by trained volunteers in residential care homes

WESTERHO Gerben J., et al
2018

Objectives: This study assesses the effects of an autobiographical memory intervention on the prevention and reduction of depressive symptoms in older persons in residential care. Trained volunteers delivered the intervention. Methods: A randomized controlled trial was carried out with depressive symptoms as the primary outcome. The experimental condition received the intervention Precious Memories one-on-one, whereas the control condition had individual unstructured contacts with a volunteer. Participants were 86 older persons living in residential care. There were three measurements: pre-intervention, post-intervention (2 months after the first measurement), and follow-up (8 months after the first measurement). Besides depressive symptoms, the retrieval of specific positive memories was measured as a process variable. Anxiety, loneliness, well-being, and mastery were assessed as secondary outcomes. Results: Depressive symptoms improved equally in the intervention and the control condition at post-measurement. Participants with clinically relevant depressive symptoms also maintained the effects at follow-up in both conditions. The retrieval of specific positive memories improved more in the autobiographical memory intervention, although this was not maintained at follow-up. Anxiety and loneliness improved equally well in both conditions, but no effects were found for well-being or mastery. Conclusion: It is concluded that volunteers can deliver the intervention and contribute to the mental health of this highly vulnerable group of older adults.

The value of peer support on cognitive improvement amongst older people living with dementia

CHAKKALACKAL Lauren
2014

Peer support can play a critical role in improving the wellbeing, social support and practical coping strategies of older people living with dementia. This paper describes selected findings from the Mental Health Foundation’s evaluation of three peer support groups for people living with dementia in extra-care housing schemes. It highlights the groups as a promising approach for maintaining cognitive faculties, reducing social isolation, increasing social networks and improving overall wellbeing. A mixed-method study design examined the impact of the groups on participants’ wellbeing, managing memory, independent living skills and social support. Participants reported positive impact from taking part in the support groups for wellbeing, social support and practical coping strategies. Participants also reported positive benefits of the groups on communication abilities, managing memory and managing their lives. Peer support groups in extra-care housing schemes address the psychological, social and emotional needs of people with dementia. This evaluation adds to the literature on the effectiveness of these interventions for those with cognitive impairment.

Results 1 - 3 of 3

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News

Moving Memory

Moving Memory Practice example about how the Moving Memory Dance Theatre Company is challenging perceived notions of age and ageing.

Chatty Cafe Scheme

Chatty Cafe Scheme Practice example about how the Chatty Cafe Scheme is helping to tackle loneliness by bringing people of all ages together

Oomph! Wellness

Oomph! Wellness Practice example about how Oomph! Wellness is supporting staff to get older adults active and combat growing levels of social isolation

KOMP

KOMP Practice example about how KOMP, designed by No Isolation is helping older people stay connected with their families

LAUGH research project

LAUGH research project Practice example about a research project to develop highly personalised, playful objects for people with advanced dementia
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