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Results for 'mental health'

Results 1 - 10 of 46

The power of support from companion animals for people living with mental health problems: a systematic review and narrative synthesis of the evidence

BROOKS Helen Louise, et al
2018

Background: There is increasing recognition of the therapeutic function pets can play in relation to mental health. However, there has been no systematic review of the evidence related to the comprehensive role of companion animals and how pets might contribute to the work associated with managing a long-term mental health condition. The aim of this study was to explore the extent, nature and quality of the evidence implicating the role and utility of pet ownership for people living with a mental health condition. Methods: A systematic search for studies exploring the role of companion animals in the management of mental health conditions was undertaken by searching 9 databases and undertaking a scoping review of grey literature from the earliest record until March 2017. To be eligible for inclusion, studies had to be published in English and report on primary data related to the relationship between domestic animal ownership and the management of diagnosable mental health conditions. Synthesis of qualitative and quantitative data was undertaken in parallel using a narrative synthesis informed by an illness work theoretical framework. Results: A total of 17 studies were included in the review. Quantitative evidence relating to the benefits of pet ownership was mixed with included studies demonstrating positive, negative and neutral impacts of pet ownership. Qualitative studies illuminated the intensiveness of connectivity people with companion animals reported, and the multi-faceted ways in which pets contributed to the work associated with managing a mental health condition, particularly in times of crisis. The negative aspects of pet ownership were also highlighted, including the practical and emotional burden of pet ownership and the psychological impact that losing a pet has. Conclusion: This review suggests that pets provide benefits to those with mental health conditions. Further research is required to test the nature and extent of this relationship, incorporating outcomes that cover the range of roles and types of support pets confer in relation to mental health and the means by which these can be incorporated into the mainstay of support for people experiencing a mental health problem.

Evaluation of Hale Community Connectors Social Prescribing Service 2017

DAYSON Chris, LEATHER David
2018

Reports on initial findings of an independent evaluation of the Community Connectors Social Prescribing Service in Bradford, covering the first nine months of the service (March-November 2017). It aims to answer some key questions about the Community Connectors Social Prescribing Service to support future commissioning by the CCG and its partners. The service was commissioned to improve the health, well-being and social connectedness of local people and reduce unplanned and unnecessary demand on primary and secondary health services. The service involves a referral from a GP of patients who could benefit from additional socially focussed support, followed by a home visit from a Community Connector to help identify what services and activities are available. The evaluation shows that a total of 703 local people were referred to the service for support by their GP. The majority of referrals were to address social issues such as anxiety and social isolation, however, a significant proportion of service users were also in poor health with long term conditions. It also identifies positive outcomes in relation to health, mental well-being, trust of people in their community, social connectedness and service users’ ability to self-care. Although too early to assess the impact on demand for primary and secondary care, service users recording up to nine per cent fewer Accident and Emergency and up to seven per cent fewer GP attendances after referral to the service.

Support for carers with mental health in Wales - Hafal

Hafal

Hafal provide a range of support to people with a serious mental illness and their carers and families. Services include advice and advocacy, family support, carers’ breaks, and carers’ groups to enable mutual support. The organisation also actively campaigns to ensure that the voices of service users and their carers are heard, especially in the planning of local services. Each of these support services are shaped by Hafal’s Recovery Programme and its underlying principles of empowerment and self-management.

Community development in health: a literature review


2016

This literature review offers a brief background to the current state of play in the NHS and statutory services, and ideas that services more flexible, place-based services are likely to offer more effective and efficient outcomes. It then provides an overview of the nature of community development, its relationship to community health and to enhancing the responsiveness of commissioning of services. It brings together evidence which shows how communities can be supported to develop their own strengths and their own trajectories of development. It also examines the health benefits of community engagement, and identifies the limitations of some studies and where evidence that suggests poor outcomes or risks. It looks developing a business case, and what is already known of costs and benefits of community development. It finds that although it is difficult to express costs and benefits of community development in monetary terms, some effective techniques do exist. The evidence shows that community development helps to strengthen and increase social networks and therefore build up social capital. Evidence shows that they to contribute significantly to individual and to community health and resilience. Existing data also suggests that community development in health is cost-effective and provides good value for money. The review includes definitions of community development and key related concepts, including as asset-based approaches, co-production, social networks, social capital, and community capital.

Carers Leeds

Carers Leeds

Carers Leeds is an independent charity that gives support, advice and information to unpaid carers aged 16 and over, which in turn seeks to improve their overall physical, mental health and wellbeing. Established in 1996, a team of expert Carer Support Workers are dedicated to improving the lives of the 72,000 carers in Leeds. Carers Leeds seeks to address both national and local policy of people with care needs being supported in the community and to remain at home, when possible. In many instances, this support is provided by a family member or friend. For this to be sustainable, carers need to be able to look after their own health and social care needs which is why support services directly to support carers are vital.

Report of the annual social prescribing network conference

SOCIAL PRESCRIBING NETWORK
2016

Report of the annual social prescribing network conference, which sets out a definition of social prescribing, outlines principles for effective service provision and the steps needed to evaluate and measure the impact of social prescribing. It also includes an analysis of a pre-conference survey, completed by 78 participants to explore their experience of social prescribing. Key ingredients identified that underpin social prescribing included: funding, healthcare professional buy-in, simple referral process, link workers with appropriate training, patient centred care, provision of services, patient buy-in and benefits of social prescribing. The benefits of social prescribing fell into six broad headings: physical and emotional health and wellbeing; behaviour change; cost effectiveness and sustainability; capacity to build up the voluntary community; local resilience and cohesion; and tackling the social determinants of ill health. Afternoon sessions covered the following topics: obtaining economic data on social prescribing; engaging different stakeholders in social prescribing; standards and regulations that could be applied to social prescribing services; qualities and skills necessary to commission high quality social prescribing services; designing research studies on social prescribing. Short case studies are included. There was consensus from participants that social prescribing provides potential to reduce pressures on health and care services through referral to non-medical, and often community-based, sources of support.

Ways to Wellbeing

York Council for Voluntary Service

Ways to Wellbeing York is a social prescribing service which aims to improve health and wellbeing through working with people referred by GPs to identify their needs and identify local services offering non-medical interventions which may be able to help. The pilot which started in 2016 offers a whole system approach to wellbeing, enabling people attending their GP to be referred to a range of support providing by over 40 voluntary and community services in the city. The service is hosted by York CVS and funded by the City Council and currently offers access to social prescription referrals through four surgeries in York based in areas of greater deprivation. The longer term aim if funding is secured is to provide a city-wide service with a target of 1,000 referrals.

The Recovery Network

KeyRing

The Recovery Network is a therapeutic support system that is jointly provided by Addicts 4 Addicts (a social enterprise providing access to high quality therapeutic interventions/ recovery support for those without the financial means to arrange this themselves) and KeyRing (a charity that supports vulnerable adults to live independently/integrate into the community). As one service user states: “KeyRing has helped me at a critical time of my recovery. After putting the work in to achieve a fair time of abstinence it has enabled me to address and work on the many mental health problems I have and to try and help me to overcome some of them and move forward in my life.”

Music In Mind Camerata in the Community

Manchester Camerata

Manchester Camerata’s involvement with older members of the community began almost ten years ago, in which they ran music composition sessions for people living in care homes alongside Age Friendly Manchester. Since 2012, Camerata runs a programme entitled ‘Music in Mind’, a music-therapy based project for people living with dementia and their carers. This was in response to a growing number of people living with dementia in Greater Manchester, and an interest from Camerata orchestral musicians to deliver this work in partnership with Music Therapists.

The impact of faith-based organisations on public health and social capital

NOVEMBER Lucy
2014

Summarises research evidence on the relationship between faith and health, and on the role of faith communities in improving health and reducing health inequalities. It also provides an overview of faith in the UK and the health problems prevalent within different ethnic and faith communities. The literature was identified through searches carried out on a range of databases and organisational websites, and was structured into two ‘strands’. Strand one looks at how faith based organisations represent communities with poor health outcomes, and provide an opportunity for public health services to access these ‘hard to reach’ groups. Strand two looks at how the social and spiritual capital gained by belonging to a faith community can result in physical and mental health benefits and mitigate other determinants of poor health. Findings from the review included that regular engagement in religious activities is positively related to various aspects of wellbeing, and negatively associated with depressive symptoms. There was also evidence to show that volunteering can positively affect the health and wellbeing of volunteers, and that faith communities represent a large proportion of national volunteering. The report provides recommendations for faith-based organisations and public health bodies, on how they might work effectively in partnership to realise the potential for faith groups of improving health and wellbeing.

Results 1 - 10 of 46

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