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Results for 'mental health problems'

Results 1 - 10 of 44

An evaluation of Wolverhampton's social prescribing service: a new route to wellbeing

MASSIE Rachel, AHMAD Nahid
2019

An independent evaluation of Wolverhampton social prescribing pilot service, which was launched in 2017 by the Clinical Commissioning Group in collaboration with Wolverhampton Voluntary Sector Council. The evaluation found that the service, which provides a link between primary care services and voluntary and community organisations for those with non-clinical issues, is highly regarded. A total of 676 referrals were received between May 2017 and December 2018. The most common reasons for referral were loneliness and low-level mental health conditions. Link workers made onward referrals to over 150 groups and services. Participants reported a positive impact on mental health, wellbeing, confidence, self-esteem, and even physical health for those who had been referred. The report estimates that Return on Investment means that for every £1 spent on the social prescribing intervention, there will be a saving of £0.15 for primary care services. The researchers recommended further awareness-raising activities, quarterly progress reports and better communication to service users around the nature of the service and wider access, as well as improved data capture.

Are acceptance and mindfulness‐based interventions ‘value for money’? Evidence from a systematic literature review

DUARTE Rui, et al
2019

Objectives: Acceptance and mindfulness‐based interventions (A/MBIs) are recommended for people with mental health conditions. Although there is a growing evidence base supporting the effectiveness of different A/MBIs for mental health conditions, the economic case for these interventions has not been fully explored. The aim of this systematic review was to identify and appraise all available economic evidence of A/MBIs for the management of mental health conditions. Methods: Eight electronic bibliographic databases (MEDLINE, MEDLINE In‐Process & Other Non‐Indexed Citations, EMBASE, Web of Science, NHS Economic Evaluation Database (EED), Database of Abstracts of Reviews of Effects (DARE), Health Technology Assessment (HTA) database, and EconLit) were searched for relevant economic evaluations published from each database's inception date until November 2017. Study selection, quality assessment, and data extraction were carried out according to published guidelines. Results: Ten relevant economic evaluations presented in 11 papers were identified. Seven of the included studies were full economic evaluations (i.e., costs and effects assessed), and three studies were partial economic evaluations (i.e., only costs were considered in the analysis). The A/MBIs that had been subjected to economic evaluation were acceptance and commitment therapy (ACT), dialectical behaviour therapy (DBT), mindfulness‐based cognitive therapy (MBCT), and mindfulness‐based stress reduction (MBSR). In terms of clinical presentations, the evaluation of cost‐effectiveness of A/MBIs has been more focused on depression and emotional unstable personality disorder with three and four economic evaluations, respectively. Three out of seven full economic evaluations observed that A/MBIs were cost‐effective for the management of mental health conditions. Nevertheless, the heterogeneity of included populations, interventions, and economic evaluation study types limits the extent to which firm conclusions can currently be made. Conclusion: This first substantive review of economic evaluations of A/MBIs indicates that more research is needed before firm conclusions can be reached on the cost‐effectiveness of A/MBIs for mental health conditions.

Moving Memory

Moving Memory Dance Theatre Company

Moving Memory Dance Theatre Company, grew out of a commission in 2010-11, in the run up for the Cultural Olympiad 2012, to develop a dance piece with a group of older women. Following the event, a group of women wanted to continue the dance group so Moving Memory was formed. Skipping forward a few years, along with the performance pieces that Moving Memory creates for public events, they also deliver workshops, bespoke participatory projects and training. Moving Memory's vision is for a society where older people live longer, healthier and more fulfilling lives because they participate in artistic, creative and physical activities. The work they produce – and the way they produce it – aims to challenge perceived notions of age and ageing, by asking audiences and participants to look beyond their assumptions and changing attitudes towards older people.

Londoners said: an analysis of the Thrive LDN community conversations

DAVIE E., et al
2018

This report presents feedback from 17 community workshops, delivered by Thrive LDN in partnership with the Mental Health Foundation, which asked Londoners how they could be better supported to be mentally healthy. The workshops were attended by over 1,000 Londoners including those who commission, provide and use services. In the workshops Londoners gave their views on how Thrive LDN's six aspirations to improve mental health could be delivered. The report includes quotations from attendees. The solutions shared common themes of spreading knowledge, skills and support so that people can better look after themselves and their neighbours. It shows that as well as wanting access to services, Londoners want to be able to help themselves. The report makes recommendations based on the discussions. These include: the development of a network of community champions to tackle isolation; using technological platforms to inform people about support and activities in their community; supporting the development of non-clinical crisis and other wellbeing centres; and providing support for parents through peer-parenting groups.

A systematic review to investigate dramatherapy group work with working age adults who have a mental health problem

BOURNE Jane, ANDERSEN-WARREN Madeline, HACKETT Simon
2018

This study investigated the effects of dramatherapy group work with adults between the ages of 18 and 65 years, who have mental health problems. A systematic review was undertaken using a meta-ethnography to synthesise the existing relevant research. Database searches identified 111 records, from which 12 were included in the review. There was a combined total of n = 194 participants from eleven of the studies; plus one study that did not give exact participant numbers. The included studies were either qualitative or mixed method, with a variety of designs: case studies, interviews, focus groups, observations, questionnaires, evaluations, and use of a variety of measurement tools. There was a range of populations, including: adults with intellectual disabilities, adult offenders, community service users, and in-patients. Participants were from a number of different settings. Overall findings were encouraging and included; improvements in social interaction, improved self- awareness, empowerment and social interaction. No negative effects were reported.

The community navigators study: loneliness in people with complex anxiety or depression

NATIONAL INSTITUTE FOR HEALTH RESEARCH. School for Social Care Research
2018

The summary findings of a study which developed a Community Navigators programme to reduce loneliness for people with anxiety or depression using secondary mental health services. The study also explores the views of participants and mental health services to the intervention and the feasibility of evaluating the programme using a randomised controlled trial. Forty participants with anxiety or depression were recruited and randomised to an intervention group (n=30), who received the programme in addition to standard care, or a control group (n=10), who received standard care and written information about local community resources. Community Navigators were recruited to help people develop new social connections, and to revive or develop existing social relationships with the aim of reducing feelings of loneliness. The study found the intervention was well received by service users. Outcomes indicate that the intervention has potential to reduce loneliness and depression.

Developing peer support in the community: a toolkit

SIDE BY SIDE RESEARCH CONSORTIUM
2017

A toolkit to help people to plan and run mental health peer support in the community. The toolkit will be especially useful for those wanting to set up new projects or those involved in commissioning peer support. It outlines the three main approaches to community-based peer support and lists a core set of values underpinning peer support, and make it different from other forms of mental health support. It also looks at how peer support might be organised and provides guidance on how to better understand and communicate the impact of groups. Sections of the toolkit include reflection questions and activities which were developed alongside more than 10 groups and projects. Links to useful resources are included. The toolkit is based upon research undertaken by the Side by Side evaluation partners, which included St George’s, University of London, the McPin Foundation, and the London School of Economics.

Evaluating the Side by Side peer support programme

BILLSBOROUGH Julie, et al
2017

An evaluation of the Side by Side programme, which aimed to increase the availability and quality of community based peer support for people experiencing mental health problems across England. The programme was led by the mental health charity Mind, in collaboration with Depression Alliance and Bipolar UK. The evaluation covered four areas: developing and testing a set of values and principles for peer support; examining the effectiveness of peer support, including changes in wellbeing; building capacity for peer support; and commissioning peer support. It also explored how peer support took place within Side by Side projects specifically aimed at peers from a Black and Minority Ethnic background. The evaluation found that peer support was valued and helpful to people involved. It also identified six core values that appeared to underpin all forms of peer support - experience in common, safety, choice and control, two way interactions, human connection, and freedom to be oneself. The findings suggest that peer support enabled people to recover a sense of personal agency and usefulness, which was beneficial to their wellbeing. The evaluation also suggests that peer support works best where commissioners, provider organisations and communities work together to develop a range of approaches to peer support and where people are enabled to take control of how and when they engage with the peer support. The evaluation team was a partnership that included a mental health research team from St George’s, University of London, the McPin Foundation.

A society of readers

HILHORST Sacha, LOCKEY Alan, SPEIGHT Tom
2018

This report, commissioned by The Reading Agency, assesses the potential of reading to tackle the issues of loneliness, mental health problems, dementia and lack of social mobility. It looks at evidence in three short literature reviews and highlights findings from reading initiatives. It also forecasts the scale of the challenge posed by an increase in loneliness, mental health problems and dementia over the next decade without effective intervention. Findings from literature reviews suggest that reading can help to combat the growing issue of loneliness, as well as acting as a tool to protect future generations from the loneliness and can also improve common symptoms of both depression and dementia. It concludes by setting out thirteen practical reading-based policies that suggest how the Government can make the most of readings potential. These include for the Government to invest £200 million in using reading to combat loneliness and for more book-based interventions as part of a social prescribing strategy for mental health and dementia.

Evaluation of Re:Connect and Time and Space peer mentoring projects: April 2014-August 2017

MacGREGOR Aisha, CAMERON Julie
2018

Outlines the main findings an evaluation of a mental health carers peer mentoring project, which delivered peer mentoring services across two sites: RE: Connect in Glasgow and Time and Space in Stirling and Clackmannanshire. The project aimed to enable mental health carers receiving peer mentoring to be better supported and have better mental health and wellbeing, and for peer mentors have improved skills and wellbeing. It involved training for peer mentors, an outreach programme to promote the project to professionals and the general public, and learning events to raise profile of mental health carers. The evaluation draws on interviews and surveys conducted with mentees, mentors, volunteers, staff members, and referral agencies. It looks at the successes and challenges experienced by the project. Case studies also provide an insight into the experience and impact of peer mentoring for both mentors and mentees. It reports that over three years, 109 individuals engaged with the project across both sites as mentors (n= 53), mentees (n=44), or volunteers (n=12). The training provided was particularly successful and helped to strengthen confidence and prepare individuals for the mentoring role and mentees also valued being supported by someone who had occupied a caring role. Challenges included the recruitment of mentees, despite direct advertising and outreach work. Overall, the project was successful, demonstrating the potential of the peer mentoring model for future provision.

Results 1 - 10 of 44

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News

Moving Memory

Moving Memory Practice example about how the Moving Memory Dance Theatre Company is challenging perceived notions of age and ageing.

Chatty Cafe Scheme

Chatty Cafe Scheme Practice example about how the Chatty Cafe Scheme is helping to tackle loneliness by bringing people of all ages together

Oomph! Wellness

Oomph! Wellness Practice example about how Oomph! Wellness is supporting staff to get older adults active and combat growing levels of social isolation

KOMP

KOMP Practice example about how KOMP, designed by No Isolation is helping older people stay connected with their families

LAUGH research project

LAUGH research project Practice example about a research project to develop highly personalised, playful objects for people with advanced dementia
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