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Results for 'mental health services'

Results 1 - 10 of 20

Evaluation of the Rotherham mental health social prescribing service 2015/16/-2016/17

DAYSON Chris, BENNETT Ellen
2017

Updated findings of an independent evaluation of the Rotherham Social Prescribing Mental Health Service, a service to help users of secondary mental health services build their own packages of support by accessing voluntary activity in the community. Voluntary activities covered four broad themes: befriending and peer support, education and training, community activity groups and therapeutic services. The service was delivered in partnership by Rotherham, Doncaster and South Humber NHS Foundation Trust (RDASH) and a group of local voluntary sector organisations led by Voluntary Action Rotherham. The evaluation looks at the impact of the service on the well-being of service users, the wider outcomes and social benefits, the impact of the service on discharge from secondary mental health services and explores the potential economic benefits of the service. It reports that over the two years of the evaluation, the service had engaged with more than 240 users of secondary mental health services in Rotherham. The service made a significant and positive impact on the well-being of mental health service users, with more than 90 per cent of service users making progress against at least one wellbeing outcome measure. Service users also experienced a range of wider benefits, including taking part in training, volunteering, taking up physical activity and sustained involvement in voluntary sector activity. Initial evidence about discharge from mental health services was also positive. The evaluation estimates that the well-being benefits experienced by service users equate to social value of up to £724,000: a social return on investment of £1.84 for every £1 invested in the service.

Joining the dots: integrating practical support in mental healthcare settings in England

ISAKSEN Mette, WILLIAMS Richard
2017

This report provides an analysis of the advice needs of Citizens Advice clients in England who report having a mental health problem. It shows how recognising the links between people’s mental health and their wider practical problems is crucial both for preventing mental health problems from escalating and improving recovery rates. The report draws on the results of an analysis of client data, a survey of Citizens Advice advisors and a survey of 2,000 people across England. The analysis shows that a growing number of people who turn to Citizens Advice for advice report having mental health problems. In addition, clients with mental health problems tend to have more complex, urgent and multiple advice needs. The report uses Citizen Advice data to explore the advice needs of people with mental health problems across the areas of: finance, essential services, housing, employment, and benefits. It also provides evidence to show that the provision of practical advice and support alongside mental health services can improve patient wellbeing and outcomes and reduce demand on public services. Despite this, the research found that less than a third of people (32 per cent) nationally who access NHS services are referred to advice services, while twice as many (64 per cent) said this would be helpful. The report recommends that service providers should take action to ensure they are responding effectively to the needs of people with mental health problems and calls for government to fund a pilot for integrated practical support in primary mental healthcare settings.

Lamb Street to the pod: the journey from 'service user' to citizen: a case study about Coventry City Council's award-winning Pod

THINK LOCAL ACT PERSONAL, NATIONAL DEVELOPMENT TEAM FOR INCLUSION
2017

This paper describes how Lamb Street Day Centre changed into The Pod, a place providing social brokerage to support and transform the lives of people with severe mental illness whilst also benefitting the wider community. Social brokerage aims to maximise an individual's connection to and inclusion in the community, and help to build social support networks. The Pod receives around 200 referrals a year, and people are supported to re-engage with their communities, access universal opportunities rather than ‘use’ services. The Pod, which is run by Coventry City Council, also hosts a café and manages a city-wide programmes, each bringing people together in a way that leads to positive social change. The paper includes short case studies which show how individuals have benefitted from the Pod.

The Government's response to the Five Year Forward View for Mental Health

GREAT BRITAIN. Her Majesty's Government
2017

This report sets out the Government’s response to the Five Year Forward View for Mental Health report by the Mental Health Taskforce. While accepting the taskforce report’s recommendations in full, this document sets out a far-reaching programme of work to improve mental health services and their links to other public services, and builds mental health prevention and response into the work of Government departments to improve the nation’s mental health and reduce the impacts of mental illness. Key areas covered include: local offer to children and young people; multi-agency suicide prevention plans; tackling alcoholism and drug addiction; access to psychological therapies; improving mental health and employment outcomes; specialist housing support for vulnerable people with mental health problems; behaviour change interventions; developing a complete health and justice pathway to deliver integrated health and justice interventions in the least restrictive setting; developing a 10-year strategy for mental health research; ensuring future updates to the Better Care Fund include mental health and social work services; ensuring GPs receive core mental health training and that the social care workforce is ready to provide high quality social work services in mental health; and ensuring accurate data collation and data sharing.

Review of the grey literature: music, singing and wellbeing

DAYKIN Norma, et al
2016

This report reviews evidence from the grey literature on wellbeing outcomes for music and singing for adults. The evidence was received through a call for evidence placed on the What Works Wellbeing website in 2016. A total of 51 reports were received, of which 32 met the inclusion criteria. These included: 12 reports on music and singing interventions with healthy adults; 12 reports on participants with a range of diagnosed conditions including COPD, Parkinson’s, stroke and mental health conditions; and eight reports on participants living with dementia. An additional five unpublished PhDs were also identified. The report summarises the evaluation methods used in the projects; quantitative and qualitative wellbeing outcomes identified; and process evaluations carried out. The review found evidence of improved mental wellbeing in evaluations of two singing interventions for people in the community experiencing, or at risk of, mental health problems. Two studies of music interventions for older participants in hospital also reported improvements in observed wellbeing. Qualitative findings also suggest that participants involved in singing and music projects report positive outcomes such as improved mood, purpose and social interaction. Adults with dementia also experienced increased engagement, relaxation, and better connection with others. Key issues reported from process evaluations included: barriers to activity, such as lack of accessible transport; institutional barriers, particularly in care home settings where projects rely on the support of care staff and managers. Limitations of the evidence are also briefly discussed.

Conceptualizing spirituality and religion for mental health practice: perspectives of consumers with serious mental illness

STARNINO Vincent R.
2016

Studies show that a high percentage of people with serious mental illness (SMI) draw upon spirituality and religion, resulting in a call for practitioners to incorporate these as part of recovery-related services. A challenge is that there are differing definitions of spirituality and religion presented in the literature which could lead to confusion in practice settings. A qualitative study was conducted with 18 participants with SMI. Findings reveal that there are important nuances, and much overlap, related to how people with psychiatric disabilities define and conceptualize spirituality and religion. Three major conceptualisations of spirituality and religion are presented. Insights from this study are relevant to practitioners interested in incorporating spirituality as part of recovery-oriented practice.

An exploration of the evidence system of UK mental health charities

BUCKLAND Leonora, FIENNES Caroline
2016

To investigate what may need to happen to help mental health charities make more evidence-informed decisions, this report examines how UK charities delivering mental health services currently produce, synthesise, disseminate and use evidence within their organisation. Semi-structured qualitative interviews with 12 mental health service delivery charities of varying sizes and qualitative interviews with four mental health sector experts were carried out. The project used an inclusive definition of evidence comprising: evaluation evidence, user feedback; practitioner evidence and contextual evidence (e.g., research into the prevalence or type of need). In relation to the production of evidence, the report found that mental health charities have focused primarily on producing practitioner and stakeholder evidence. Although larger charities are beginning to carry out more evaluation research, lack of resources remain a problem. It also identified little evidence produced by the charities interviewed being routinely synthesised or included in systematic reviews; weak dissemination channels; and little use of third-party evidence when making decisions. Although the number of charities interviewed was small, the report identifies some important gaps including: the need for more rigorous evaluation research about the effectiveness of charities’ interventions; the potential to make more use of existing the academic literature; and, for more evidence to be actively disseminated within the sector to enable greater learning. Recommendations to improve evidence systems are also included.

Support from the start: commissioning early intervention services for mental ill health

NHS CLINICAL COMMISSIONERS
2016

Presents four case studies to show how Clinical Commissioning Groups and their partners are commissioning early intervention initiatives in mental health services. The case studies cover: Hounslow’s Friends for Life programme, which is helping to boost the resilience of young people; Salford’s early intervention in psychosis; Coventry and Warwickshire’s maternal mental health service; Kernow’s suicide liaison service. The case studies outline progress to date and highlight the value of the intervention. The paper also provides six top tips for commissioners early intervention services in mental health.

Implementing the Five Year Forward View for Mental Health

NHS ENGLAND
2016

Implementation plan which outlines a roadmap for delivering the commitments made in the Five Year Forward View for Mental Health to people who use services and the public in order to improve care. It prioritises objectives for delivery by 2020/21 and is intended as a blueprint for the changes that NHS staff, other organisations and other parts of the system can make. Key principles of the plan include co-production, working in partnership with local public, private and voluntary sector organisations; early interventions and delivering person-centred care. The plan also gives a clear indication to the public and people who use services what they can expect from the NHS, and when. It also outlines future funding commitments, shows how the workforce requirements will be delivered in these priority areas, and how data and payment will support transparency. Separate sections cover: children and young people’s mental health; perinatal mental health; adult mental health – including community, acute, crisis care and secure care; mental health and justice, and suicide prevention. These individual chapters set out national-level objectives, costs and planning assumptions. Chapters also describe cross-cutting work to help sustain transformation, including testing new models of care and ensuring the health and wellbeing of the NHS workforce.

Social prescribing for mental health: a guide to commissioning and delivery

FRIEDLI Lynne
2008

This guidance describes the use of non-medical interventions, sometimes called ‘social prescribing’ or ‘community referral’, to improve mental health and wellbeing. Social prescribing supports improved access both to psychological treatments and to interventions addressing the wider determinants of mental health. It can contribute to greater awareness of the relative contribution to mental wellbeing of individual psychological skills and attributes (e.g. autonomy, positive affect and self-efficacy) and the circumstances of people’s lives: housing, employment, income and status. The guide: examines the benefits of social prescribing; outlines the policy context and evidence base for social prescribing; gives guidance on commissioning social prescribing; provides information on interventions and how to deliver social prescribing; and describes the findings of a social prescribing development project commissioned by Care Services Improvement Partnership (CSIP) North West. Overall, the guidance aims to support localities in developing, implementing and evaluating social prescribing schemes, with a special focus on mental health and wellbeing. The report recommends that social prescribing is made available as part of prevention and early intervention within primary care, and also to support recovery from severe mental distress.

Results 1 - 10 of 20

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