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Results for 'models'

Results 1 - 10 of 14

Asset-based commissioning: better outcomes, better value

FIELD Richard, MILLER Clive
2017

This publication provides an overview of asset-based practice and looks at the development of asset-aware and asset-based commissioning. It makes the case for adopting asset-based commissioning to improve outcomes for individuals and the community and outlines the implications for stakeholders, systems, behaviours and relationships of making this change. Asset-based commissioning is an approach which enables people and communities to become equal co-commissioners and co-producers and make the best use of all assets. The publication includes many examples of past and current innovations and looks at how they could be further developed and implemented at scale to achieve improved, economic, environmental and social outcomes. Key sections: look at the development of asset-based practice, its key principles and the role played by user-led organisations, personalisation, co-production and self-help ; examine how commissioning has evolved over the last three decades and how the current model is moving towards asset-based commissioning; and describe the paradigm shift involved in moving from conventional to asset-based commissioning and synthesises a wide range of asset-based commissioning practices into a unified model. The final section provides a guide to where and how to get started in developing asset-based commissioning and explores how to do this at scale.

'Three Conversation Model' Transforming Lives Cambridgeshire County Council Adults Learning Disabilities Team

Cambridgeshire County Council

East Cambridgeshire Learning Disability Partnership is a multi disciplinary team providing social care and specialist health input to adults with learning disabilities living in the community. In 2014, Cambridgeshire County Council started its Transforming Lives programme to meet new requirements arising from the Care Act, and as part of this programme the East Cambridgeshire Learning Disability Partnership team began to pilot the Three Conversation Model (pioneered by Partners for Change) in October of that year. The model is now well established in the team and has been rolled out across the council.

Good practice in social prescribing for mental health: the role of nature-based interventions

BRAGG R., LECK C.
2017

Building on early findings from Natural England, this research the value of nature-based or green care interventions within social prescribing services for people with mental health problems and highlights good practice in social prescribing services for commissioners. It draws on the results of an evidence review and an event for health and social care professionals involved with social prescribing in Leeds. The report looks at definitions of green care, models of social prescribing, examples of good practice, suggestions for scaling up nature-based interventions with social prescribing, and evidence of effectiveness and cost effectiveness. The review identified a number of different social prescribing models currently operating in England. The case studies included in the report suggest that good practice in social prescribing depends on good partnerships, high levels of cooperation and joint ownership between a wide range of individuals, groups and organisations with very different organisational cultures. Barriers to the sustainability and scaling up of social prescribing included the lack of a consistent referral mechanism and lack of direct funding for the social prescription element delivered by third sector providers. The report identifies key areas for future action

New care models and prevention: an integral partnership

NHS CONFEDERATION, et al
2016

This publication looks at what new care models are doing on prevention and what the emerging practice looks like. Key to the realisation of the Forward View vision and principles has been the development of ‘new care models’ which have prevention and public health at their heart, and are forging ahead. The new models include: integrated primary and acute care systems (PACS), multispecialty community providers (MCPs), enhanced health in care homes, urgent and emergency care, and acute care collaborations. Through a rigorous process, involving workshops and the engagement of key partners and patient representative groups, 50 new care model ‘vanguards’ were selected, taking the lead on the development and implementation of new care models. This publication looks at how five of the vanguards are addressing prevention. These are: All Together Better Sunderland (MCP); West Wakefield Health and Wellbeing (MCP); Sutton Homes of Care (enhanced health in care homes); Connecting Care – Wakefield District (enhanced health in care homes); and Solihull Together for Better Lives (urgent and emergency care). The case studies all show the importance of having as full an understanding as possible of the needs of the local population, including in some cases through risk stratification. Working across organisational and professional boundaries, and getting staff on board, involved and equipped to deliver care in new ways has also proven to be essential. Equally important is tapping into and getting the most out of the experience and skills of carers, volunteers and third sector organisations, and empowering people to ‘self-care’. At the same time, initiatives such as social prescribing have the potential to greatly improve people’s wellbeing. These case studies highlight the need to look beyond the boundaries of health and social care services to the way people actually live their lives, and tailor the support accordingly

Dementia friendly communities: guidance for councils

LOCAL GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION, INNOVATIONS IN DEMENTIA
2015

This guidance looks at current best practice and learning in the creation of dementia friendly communities, how it fits within the broader policy landscape, and what actions councils can take, and are already taking in supporting people with dementia by creating local dementia friendly communities. It illustrates how simple changes to existing services, and awareness raising for those who come into day-to-day contact with people with dementia such as staff working in libraries or in leisure centres, can help people with dementia feel more confident and welcome in using council services. The guide looks at what a dementia friendly community is, why dementia is a key issue for councils and the role councils can play. It then presents a framework to help develop to plan, develop and assess the dementia friendliness of any community, organisation or process. The framework covers five domains: the voices of people with dementia and their supporters, the place, the people, resources, and networks. For each domain information is included on: the background to the issue, key actions that councils can take to make this happen, and examples or case studies of existing practice. The guide for those who have a role in leading, planning, commissioning and delivering public services; including health and wellbeing boards, and those responsible for health and social care services.

Powerful people: reinforcing the power of citizens and communities in health and care: report

MUIR Rick, QUILTER-PINNER Harry
2015

This report argues that giving citizens greater control over their health and care can both promote the redesign of services, so that they are developed around citizens needs and aspirations, and also save money by supporting people to manage their conditions themselves. The report begins by looking at what empowerment in health and care means and the benefits it can bring in terms of autonomy, better health outcomes, patient satisfaction, and reductions in cost. It then describes previous programmes and initiatives which aimed to give citizens and communities greater power and why these approaches have not been entirely successful. It then describes five models of care which actively empower citizens and communities and address the deficiencies of previous initiatives. The models described are: social prescribing; brokerage and integration; peer support; asset-based community development; and technology-enabled care plans, which provide people with the tools to better manage their condition themselves. The final chapter identifies five enablers of systems change to help encourage the development and wider adoption of these new models of care: finance, devolving power and integration, recruitment and training workforce, the adoption new technology, empowering citizens to have greater control of their health and care.

MDT development: working toward an effective multidisciplinary/multiagency team

NHS ENGLAND
2015

One of three handbooks to support commissioners, GP practices and community health and care professionals in planning and providing personalised care for people living with long term conditions. The handbook brings together information about multi-disciplinary and integrated teams and looks at the types of teams that need to be in place to deliver integrated healthcare. It provides definitions of multi-disciplinary and multi-agency teams and also sets out a tool, the MDT Continuum, that describes different types of care team functioning. Four models or stages of multidisciplinary teams are presented, ranging from from unidisciplinary to transdisciplinary team working. Good practice examples representing each of the stages or models. The final section provide information to help integrated commissioning. Other handbooks published separately cover risk stratification and case finding and personalised care and support planning.

Local area coordination: from service users to citizens

BROAD Ralph
2012

An exploration of how local area coordination can support people to pursue their vision for a good life, build stronger communities and help reform care services in England and Wales. Local area coordinators, from within their own local communities, provide information, advice and support to help people to solve their own problems. Instead of focusing on deficits, they help people focus on their own vision for a good life, building on their own assets and relationships and acting as a bridge to communities. The model is built on seven key principles, which include: citizenship; relationships; information; the gifts that each member of the community can bring; expertise; leadership; and services as a back up to natural support. The report argues that local area coordination offers the chance for the whole service system to rebalance itself and to focus on local solutions and stronger communities, whilst also offering a powerful catalyst to wider social care system reform.

Wiltshire Council: help to live at home service: an outcome-based approach to social care: case study report

OXFORD BROOKES UNIVERSITY. Institute of Public Care
2012

The case study describes the process that Wiltshire Council has used to develop its new ‘Help to Live at Home Service’ for older people and others who require help to remain at home. The approach focused on the outcomes that the older people wish to gain from social care. It involved a complete overhaul of the social care system from the role of the social worker working alongside the customer to determine the required outcomes to the role of the providers of the service who must deliver these outcomes and receive payment based on that delivery. The report aims to promote discussion about how outcomes-based, personalised support can best work in social care in England in the future.

Commissioning assisted living technologies: guidance

SKILLS FOR CARE
2014

The practice guidance has been produced to support people who have the responsibility for commissioning assisted living technology (ALT) and assisted living services (ALS). These services include : telecare; digital participation services which educate, entertain and encourage social interaction to enrich the lives of people in need of social support; and wellness services which encourage people to adopt and maintain healthy lifestyles. The guide looks at general principles, such as establishing a vision and defining the strategy; carrying out a local needs assessment; service specification and procurement; and developing systems to measure performance and impact. Although primarily developed for commissioners based in social care settings, it may also be useful for those working across housing or health services. An accompanying research report and toolkit have also been produced.

Results 1 - 10 of 14

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