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Results for 'music'

Results 1 - 10 of 23

In-home use of personalized music for persons with dementia

KULIBERT Danica, et al
2019

Although evidence is mounting that personalised music has beneficial effects for long-term care residents with dementia, little research has examined the effects of personalised music for the majority of persons with dementia living at home. These individuals live at home with care partners who may also benefit from having music that is personalised for their loved one. Using the Music & MemorySM program of personalised playlists delivered via iPod Shuffles®, the current study examined the effects of the Music & Memory program for persons with dementia by using the Bath Assessment of Subjective Quality of Life in Dementia scale and a Music Listening Experience Scale developed for this study. This study also administered three scales that captured care partner experiences. Transcripts of the Bath Assessment of Subjective Quality of Life in Dementia administrations at the beginning of the study and 3 months later, plus interviews about the Music & Memory program, were then analysed using the interpretive phenomenological analysis method. Themes about the Music & Memory program and life living with dementia for from diagnosed persons and their care partners are discussed.

Treasury of arts activities for older people

Postlethwaite Liz
2019

A collection of 50 participatory arts activities to provide practical ideas and inspiration for those working with older people in any setting. The collection includes short activities that take 15 minutes or less, longer activities, and planned workshops of 45 minutes or more. They cover visual art, music, movement and dance, performance and stories and poetry. The publication also provide min-guides that explore the challenges of working with older people, things to consider when working in different settings or when working with people with dementia. A selection of links are also included to help develop further skills.

Impact of individualised music listening intervention on persons with dementia: A systematic review of randomised controlled trials

GAVIOLA Minah Amor, et al
2019

Objective: To summarise the evidence regarding the impact of individualised music listening on persons with dementia. Methods: Six electronic databases (CINAHL, Medline, ProQuest, PsycINFO, Music Periodicals and Cochrane) were searched up to July 2018 for randomised controlled trials (RCTs) evaluating the efficacy of individualised music listening compared to other music and non–music‐based interventions. Results: Four studies were included. Results showed evidence of a positive impact of individualised music listening on behavioural and psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSDs) including agitation, anxiety and depression and physiological outcomes. Evidence for other outcomes such as cognitive function and quality of life was limited. Conclusions: The limited evidence suggests individualised music listening has comparable efficacy to more resource‐intensive interventions. However, there was a small number of RCTs and some outcomes were evaluated by a single study. This limits the conclusions drawn, warranting more RCTs evaluating other outcomes beyond the BPSDs.

Testing the implementation of the Veder contact method: a theatre-based communication method in dementia care

BOERSMA Petra, et al
2019

Background and Objectives: There is a lack of research on implementation of person-centered care in nursing home care. The purpose of this study was to assess the implementation of the Veder contact method (VCM), a new person-centered method using theatrical, poetic and musical communication for application in 24-hr care. Research Design and Methods: Caregivers (n = 136) and residents (n = 141) participated in a 1-year quasi-experimental study. Foundation Theater Veder implemented VCM on six experimental wards and rated implementation quality. Six control wards delivered care-as-usual. Before and after implementation, caregiver behavior was assessed during observations using the Veder-observation list and Quality of Caregivers’ Behavior-list. Caregiver attitude was rated with the Approaches to Dementia Questionnaire. Quality of life, behavior, and mood of the residents were measured with QUALIDEM, INTERACT and FACE. Residents’ care plans were examined for person-centered background information. Results: Significant improvements in caregivers’ communicative behavior (i.e., the ability to apply VCM, establishing positive interactions) and some aspects of residents’ behavior and quality of life (i.e., positive affect, social relations) were found on the experimental wards with a high implementation score, as compared to the experimental wards with a low implementation score, and the control wards. No significant differences were found between the groups in caregivers’ attitudes, residents’ care plans, or mood. Discussion and Implications: The positive changes in caregivers’ behavior and residents’ well-being on the high implementation score wards confirm the partly successful VCM implementation. Distinguishing between wards with a high and low implementation score provided insight into factors which are crucial for successful implementation.

Non-pharmacological interventions for people with dementia: a review of reviews

MEYER Claudia, O'KEEFE Fleur
2018

Objective: Aged care services increasingly respond to the needs of people with dementia. Non-pharmacological approaches are preferable to reduce responsive behaviours, improve/maintain functional capacity and reduce emotional disorders. This rapid review of systematic reviews aimed to consolidate the evidence for non-pharmacological interventions and determine outcome effectiveness. Methods: Systematic review literature was comprehensively searched for non-pharmacological interventions for dementia in residential care. Quality ratings used adapted GRADE methodology, and ease of implementation assessed. Results: Of 629 abstracts screened, 81 full-text articles were retrieved, 38 articles included. The strongest evidence for reducing responsive behaviours was music, sensory stimulation, simulated presence and validation therapies. Exercise and light therapy improved/maintained activities of daily living, while cognitive stimulation and reminiscence improved cognition. Strongest evidence for reducing emotional disorders was music, psychological interventions and reminiscence. Conclusion: Much evidence of varying quality exists, with resource-constrained residential care providers now able to make evidence-based decisions about non-pharmacological interventions.

‘Now he sings’. the my musical memories reminiscence programme: personalised interactive reminiscence sessions for people living with dementia

EVANS Simon C., GARABEDIAN Claire, BRAY Jennifer
2019

This paper explores the impact of the My Musical Memories Reminiscence Programme (MMMRP), an innovative intervention that adopts a music-based reminiscence approach. MMMRP builds on the format of the popular Singing for the Brain sessions with the aim of increasing opportunities for interaction and reminiscence amongst people living with dementia. Data were collected pre- and post-intervention and three months later using structured observation, interviews and focus groups. Results suggest that the programme had a positive impact on participants by promoting engagement, reminiscence and social interaction. For some individuals the impacts continued beyond their participation in the programme. A range of key facilitators for successful implementation of this approach were identified including the Session Leader role, the involvement of informal carers and the input of volunteers.

Briefing for the Cross-Party Group on Arts and Health

WELSH NHS CONFEDERATION
2019

Arts-based projects provide innovative, person-centred approaches to improving the health and wellbeing of the population. This briefing provides case studies to show how NHS organisations and others are working together use arts based initiatives to tackle loneliness and isolation in Wales. They include The Remote Choir, which allows people to participate from the comfort of their own homes; a Hidden Talents is a creative music project for adults who live with learning disabilities; and Story Care and Share which brings together lonely and isolated people together through storytelling.

Cultural engagement and incident depression in older adults: evidence from the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing

FANCOURT Daisy, TYMOSZUK Urszula
2019

Background: There is a recognised need for the identification of factors that might be protective against the development of depression in older adults. Over the past decade, there has been growing research demonstrating the effects of cultural engagement (which combines a number of protective factors including social interaction, cognitive stimulation and gentle physical activity) on the treatment of depression, but as yet not on its prevention. Aims: To explore whether cultural engagement in older adults is associated with a reduced risk of developing depression over the following decade. Method: Working with data from 2148 adults in the English Longitudinal Study of Ageing who were free from depression at baseline, the study used logistic regression models to explore associations between frequency of cultural engagement (including going to museums, theatre and cinema) and the risk of developing depression over the following 10 years using a combined index of the Centre for Epidemiological Studies Depression Scale (CES-D) and physician-diagnosed depression. Results: There was a dose–response relationship between frequency of cultural engagement and the risk of developing depression independent of sociodemographic, health-related and social confounders. This equated to a 32% lower risk of developing depression for people who attended every few months (odds ratio (OR) = 0.68, 95% CI 0.47–0.99, P = 0.046) and a 48% lower risk for people who attended once a month or more (OR = 0.52, 95% CI 0.34–0.80, P = 0.003). Results were robust to sensitivity analyses exploring reverse causality, subclinical depressive symptoms and alternative CES-D thresholds. Conclusions: Cultural engagement appears to be an independent risk-reducing factor for the development of depression in older age.

Arts on prescription for community‐dwelling older people with a range of health and wellness needs

POULOS Roslyn G., et al
2019

Published evidence for the role of participatory art in supporting health and well‐being is growing. The Arts on Prescription model is one vehicle by which participatory art can be delivered. Much of the focus of Arts on Prescription has been on the provision of creative activities for people with mental health needs. This Arts on Prescription program, however, targeted community‐dwelling older people with a wide range of health and wellness needs. Older people were referred to the program by their healthcare practitioner. Professional artists led courses in visual arts, photography, dance and movement, drama, singing, or music. Classes were held weekly for 8–10 weeks, with six to eight participants per class, and culminated with a showing of work or a performance. Program evaluation involved pre‐ and postcourse questionnaires, and focus groups and individual interviews. Evaluation data on 127 participants aged 65 years and older were available for analysis. This study found that Arts on Prescription had a positive impact on participants. Quantitative findings revealed a statistically significant improvement in the Warwick–Edinburgh Mental Well‐being Scale (WEMWBS) as well as a statistically significant increase in the level of self‐reported creativity and frequency of creative activities. Qualitative findings indicated that the program provided challenging artistic activities which created a sense of purpose and direction, enabled personal growth and achievement, and empowered participants, in a setting which fostered the development of meaningful relationships with others. This evaluation adds to the evidence base in support of Arts on Prescription by expanding the application of the model to older people with a diverse range of health and wellness needs.

'What would life be: without a song or a dance, what are we?' A report from the Commission on Dementia and Music

BOWELL Sally, BAMFORD Sally-Marie
2018

This report examines the current landscape of using therapeutic music with people with dementia, outlines the value and benefits of music therapy, and looks at what needs to be done to ensure that everyone with dementia is able to access music. Informed by the Commission on Dementia and Music, the report brings together a wide range of evidence, including academic papers, written and oral evidence, and evidence from site visits. The evidence shows that music can help to minimise symptoms of dementia, such as agitation and can help tackle anxiety and depression. Evidence also shows that music can help improves the quality of life for people with dementia by increasing social interaction and decreasing stress. The report also shows that although the dementia and music environment is supported by a dedicated network of individuals and organisations, they work in a complex and poorly coordinate system. The field is also defined by sporadic access, with only relatively few people with dementia having access. It concludes that the sector would benefit from increased funding, further cost-effective research to boost recognition and funding, and increased public awareness about the benefits of music. The report includes recommendations to help improve access to music for people with dementia.

Results 1 - 10 of 23

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News

Moving Memory

Moving Memory Practice example about how the Moving Memory Dance Theatre Company is challenging perceived notions of age and ageing.

Chatty Cafe Scheme

Chatty Cafe Scheme Practice example about how the Chatty Cafe Scheme is helping to tackle loneliness by bringing people of all ages together

Oomph! Wellness

Oomph! Wellness Practice example about how Oomph! Wellness is supporting staff to get older adults active and combat growing levels of social isolation

KOMP

KOMP Practice example about how KOMP, designed by No Isolation is helping older people stay connected with their families

LAUGH research project

LAUGH research project Practice example about a research project to develop highly personalised, playful objects for people with advanced dementia
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