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Results for 'nursing homes'

Results 1 - 5 of 5

Using dolls for therapeutic purposes: A study on nursing home residents with severe dementia

CANTARELLA A., et al
2018

Objectives: Among the psychosocial interventions intended to reduce the behavioural and psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSD), doll therapy (DT) is increasingly used in clinical practice. Few studies on DT have been based on empirical data obtained with an adequate procedure; however, none have assessed its efficacy using an active control group, and the scales used to assess changes in BPSD are usually unreliable. The aim of the present study was to measure the impact of DT on people with severe dementia with a reliable, commonly used scale for assessing their BPSD, and the related distress in formal caregivers. Effects of DT on the former's everyday abilities (i.e., eating behaviour) were also examined. Method: Twenty‐nine nursing home residents aged from 76 to 96 years old, with severe dementia (Alzheimer's or vascular dementia), took part in the experiment. They were randomly assigned to an experimental group that used dolls or an active control group that used hand warmers with sensory characteristics equivalent to the dolls. Benefits of DT on BPSD and related formal caregiver distress were examined with the Neuropsychiatric Inventory. The effects of DT on eating behaviour were examined with the Eating Behavior Scale. Results: Only the DT group showed a reduction in BPSD scores and related caregiver distress. DT did not benefit eating behaviour, however. Conclusions: This study suggests that DT is a promising approach for reducing BPSD in people with dementia, supporting evidence emerging from previous anecdotal studies.

Intermediate Care in Cookson's Nursing Home

Somerset Care and Yeovil District Hospital

Cookson’s Court nursing home was opened by Somerset Care in September 2015 with one floor of the new facility reserved solely for the use of the company’s new intermediate care/reablement service, delivered in collaboration with Yeovil District Hospital. “There are no words to express my gratitude, thank you with all my heart. I’ve been born again.” (Service user feedback). In part a response to poor delayed discharge performance in the Somerset area, the collaboration aims to: improve patient flow at Yeovil District Hospital and reduce lengths of stay; provide a reablement focused environment; and improve clinical outcomes and reduce costs.

Getting serious about prevention: enabling people to stay out of hospital at the end of life

GREY Andrew
2015

This report sets out key steps that commissioners can take in collaboration with service providers to enable people who are approaching the end of life to avoid being admitted to hospital when this is possible and appropriate, as well as enabling those who are admitted to make a transition to a community setting quickly. The report argues that as well as reducing the costs to the NHS, enabling people to stay out of hospital at the end of life can make a significant difference to the experiences of dying people and their families. The report makes a number of recommendations for commissioners, service providers and health and social care staff, including: commissioning the increased provision of 24/7 care in community settings, through care homes and hospices, and community health and social care services that can provide care in people’s homes; commissioning anticipatory prescribing of medicines for people approaching the end of life; using available funding, through System Resilience Groups, the Better Care Fund, and Integrated Personal Commissioning, to improve co-ordination between hospitals and community settings, including hospices, for people approaching the end of life; and health and social care staff identifying carers of people who are approaching the end of life and referring them for local authority assessments.

Sustainability, innovation and empowerment: a five year vision for the independent social care sector

CARE ENGLAND
2015

Sets out Care England’s vision for the next five years on how the organisation and the sector plan to deal with a number of issues facing the health and social care system. The report focuses on critical areas of the current social care landscape, including: integrated and person-centred care; falling fees and local authorities’ budgetary constraints; recruitment of nurses; recruitment, pay and training of the care workforce; raising awareness of the value of the sector; the Care Quality Commission and the need for further improvement of the regulation process; learning disabilities; and dementia. The report warns of the risk of a collapse in the system if providers and commissioners do not work together and more nurses are not recruited into the independent sector.

Digital reablement: a personalised service to reduce admissions and readmissions to hospitals and nursing homes

DOUGHTY Kevin, MULVIHILL Patrick
2013

Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to consider the importance of digital healthcare through telecare and portable assistive devices in supporting the reengineering of healthcare to deal with the needs of an older and more vulnerable population wishing to remain in their own homes. Design/methodology/approach: It supports the importance of the assessment process to identify hazards associated with independent living, and the possible consequences of accidents. By measuring and prioritising the risks, appropriate management strategies may be introduced to provide a safer home environment. Findings: A process for assessing and managing these risks has been developed. This can be applied to a wide range of different cases and yields solutions that can support independence. Research limitations/implications: The developed digital reablement process can be used to provide vulnerable people with a robust form of risk management. Practical implications: If telecare services follow the process described in this paper then they will improve the outcomes for their users. Originality/value: The process described in this paper is the first attempt to produce a robust assessment process for introducing telecare services in a reablement context.

Results 1 - 5 of 5

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