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Results for 'nutrition'

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Reducing falls in older adults recently discharged from hospital: a systematic review and meta-analysis

NASERI Chiara, et al
2018

Background: older adults are known to have increased falls rates and functional decline following hospital discharge, with substantial economic healthcare costs. This systematic review aimed to synthesise the evidence for effective falls prevention interventions in older adults recently discharged from hospital. Methods: literature searches of six databases of quantitative studies conducted from 1990 to June 2017, reporting falls outcomes of falls prevention interventions for community-dwelling older adults discharged from hospital were included. Study quality was assessed using a standardised JBI critical appraisal tool (MAStARI) and data pooled using Rev-Man Review Manager® Results: sixteen studies (total sample size N = 3,290, from eight countries, mean age 77) comprising 12 interventions met inclusion criteria. Findings: home hazard modification interventions delivered to those with a previous falls history (1 study), was effective in reducing the number of falls (RR 0.63, 95%CI 0.43, 0.93, Low GRADE evidence). Home exercise interventions (3 studies) significantly increased the proportion of fallers (OR 1.74, 95%CI 1.17, 2.60, Moderate GRADE evidence), and did not significantly reduce falls rate (RR 1.27, 95%CI 0.99, 1.62, Very Low GRADE evidence) or falls injury rate (RR 1.16, 95%CI, 0.83,1.63, Low GRADE evidence). Nutritional supplementation for malnourished older adults (1 study) significantly reduced the proportion of fallers (HR 0.41, 95% CI 0.19, 0.86, Low GRADE evidence). Conclusion: the recommended falls prevention interventions for older adults recently discharged from hospital are to provide home hazard minimisation particularly if they have a recent previous falls history and consider nutritional supplementation if they are malnourished.

Staying on my feet. Falls prevention: best practice guide for care homes in Wales

MY HOME LIFE CYMRU
2018

This best practice guide, which has been funded by the Welsh Government, explores what works well in supporting care home residents to remain mobile and to reduce their risk of falling. It draws on the experiences of care home staff attending events in Wales to share their expertise and stories of good practice. The guide includes examples on how care home practitioners can support residents to navigate safely around the home; how they can help residents feel motivated to get out of their chair and engage in physical activity, and how they can encourage residents to drink or eat properly. It also shows how staff have to consider how they help get the balance between reducing the risks of falling with the rights of these individuals to make choices. The guide highlights a number of creative individual strategies. It also includes a Care Home Falls Prevention Wheel which identifies 8 key areas that together can support best practice.

Adding extra years to life and extra life to those years: local government guide to healthy ageing

LOCAL GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION
2018

Guide that sets out priority areas for partnership working to improve later life health. The guide focuses on taking a life course approach and developing healthy behaviours and includes practice examples. The eight case studies in the guide provide examples about what can work to reduce the impact of long-term conditions. The case examples cover tackling loneliness and isolation; preventing falls; getting older people active; using lottery funding to boost healthy ageing; an Olympic legacy for older people; extending the NHS Health Checks programme; getting people talking about their health and reshaping the strategy on health ageing.

The economic value of Dorset POPP services. A focus on two significant issues: malnutrition and fire safety

HARFLETT Naomi, et al
2016

An economic analysis of three schemes from Dorset Partnership for Older People Projects (POPP), focusing on their value and effectiveness in preventing malnutrition and preventing fire related injuries. Dorset POPP schemes use a community led preventative approach and aim to improve the quality of life of older people and to save money by preventing ineffective use of publicly funded services. The report uses published figures of the costs of malnutrition and the economic value of preventing fire injuries and applies the figure to contact monitoring and costs data from three of the Dorset POPP projects to provide an estimate of the potential economic value. The schemes are: the Wayfinder Programme, which provides signposting and support on services such as welfare benefits and pensions, retaining independent living, social activities, telecare and lunch clubs; the Community Initiatives Commissioning Fund (CICF), which funds initiatives identified by local people such as lunch clubs, social clubs, and neighbourcare schemes; and Safe And Independent Living (SAIL) multi-agency referral scheme, which provides a multi-agency referral approach to enabling access to signposting, support, and services. For all of the interventions included in the analysis, just a very small proportion (often less than one per cent) of the contacts or referrals made would be needed to prevent malnutrition or fire related injuries, in order to save money.

Local leadership, new approaches: how new ways of working are helping to improve the health of local communities

PUBLIC HEALTH ENGLAND
2015

Examines how local authorities and health teams are working together to improve the health of local communities through prevention and early intervention. The report features seven case studies. Each one describes a particular programme or close partnership between a local authority and local public health or health care teams, often with the additional support of the voluntary sector. Each initiative focuses on a specific area and/or set of activities, including: integrating wellbeing; transforming the food culture in schools; helping people stay in their own homes; GPs linking people to other sources of support; healthy homes and housing conditions; promoting public health in schools; and active living.

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