Coronavirus guidance for social care and social work

#EXCLUDE#
#EXCLUDE#

Find prevention records by subject or service provider/commissioner name

  • Key to icons

    • Journal Prevention service example
    • Book Book
    • Digital media Digital media
    • Journal Journal article
    • Free resource Free resource

Results for 'older people'

Results 1 - 10 of 338

ConnectWELL

ConnectWELL

Introducing ConnectWELL - a social prescribing service – initially funded and piloted in 2014 by NHS Rugby CCG, which aims to improve health and wellbeing for patients and clients. ConnectWELL provides Health Professionals with just one, straightforward referral route to the many Voluntary and Community Sector organisations, groups and activities that can address underlying societal causes, manage or prevent compounding factors of ill-health. ConnectWELL has over 900 organisations and activities, ranging from Carers’ support, community groups, disability services, Faith / Religious / Cultural Activities, Housing / Homelessness Support, Mentoring, Music Groups, and volunteering opportunities.

New horizons in supporting older people's health and wellbeing: is social prescribing a way forward?

HAMILTON-WEST Kate, MILNE Alisoun, HOTHAM Sarah
2020

Older people’s health and care needs are changing. Increasing numbers live with the combined effects of age-related chronic illness or disability, social isolation and/or poor mental health. Social prescribing has potential to benefit older people by helping those with social, emotional or practical needs to access relevant services and resources within the local community. However, researchers have highlighted limitations with the existing evidence-base, while clinicians express concerns about the quality of onward referral services, liability and upfront investment required. The current article provides a critical review of evidence on social prescribing, drawing on the RE-AIM Framework (Glasgow et al., 1999) to identify questions that will need to be addressed in order to inform both the design and delivery of services and the evolving research agenda around social prescribing. The authors emphasise the need for researchers and planners to work together to develop a more robust evidence-base, advancing understanding of the impacts of social prescribing (on individuals, services and communities), factors associated with variation in outcomes and strategies needed to implement effective and sustainable programmes. They also call on policymakers to recognise the need for investment in allied initiatives to address barriers to engagement in social prescribing programmes, provide targeted support for carers and improve access to older adult mental health services. The article concludes that social prescribing has potential to support older people’s health and wellbeing, but this potential will only be realised through strategic alignment of research, local level implementation and national policy and investment.

Promising approaches revisited: effective action on loneliness in later life

JOPLING Kate
2020

Drawing on the expertise and experience of leading figures in the field, academic literature and other evidence, this report presents an update to an earlier framework for loneliness interventions published in 2015. The framework helps to make sense of the different ways we can address loneliness, and explains how these approaches fit together to create an effective community response. The guide offers examples of these approaches in action so that organisations can find inspiration from others. The new guide learns the lessons of the last five years – as well as the impact of the pandemic and how organisations tackling loneliness have adapted. Its key message is that to tackle loneliness, different types of support need to be in place. People need to have the infrastructure to engage in social life, whether that is about digital, transport or a built environment that supports social life. Finally, there are direct ways of reducing loneliness whether that is one-to-one or in groups, or psychological support. A key change to the framework is the addition of the built environment as part of the ‘gateway infrastructure’ that helps tackle loneliness, recognising the role shops, cafes and pubs play as places to meet.

All those who wander are not lost: walking with purpose in extra care, retirement and domestic housing

BARRETT Julie, EVANS Simon, PRITCHARD-WILKES Vanessa
2020

Sets out the findings from a mixed methods study exploring walking with purpose in extra care, retirement and domestic housing settings, along with the perceptions and responses of staff and family carers. The term ‘wandering’ has become a label with negative overtones in the context of dementia care and suggests aimlessness, whereas in fact there is often a purpose or aim behind this activity. In recognition of this, the term ‘walking with purpose’ is used in this study while also acknowledging that this includes ‘wandering’ as a normal and valuable human activity. The study indicates that, although residents who walk with purpose constitute a minority of people living in retirement and extra care housing schemes, managing walking with purpose can be a challenge for management and staff and can occupy a disproportionate amount of their time. The findings emphasise the importance of: getting to know the resident, finding out their motivations and reasons for walking and trying to accommodate their wishes; ensuring staff receive appropriate training in understanding and addressing walking with purpose; ensuring the design of the physical environment supports the way-finding abilities of people living with dementia. Example design recommendations that emerged from this study include: gardens and outdoor spaces must be secure and enclosed; provide safe indoor and outdoor walking routes with frequent places to rest and interesting things to see and do along the way; design features to assist with way-finding. The paper also supports the use of assistive technology devices such as contact ID wrist bands, door sensors, speaking door sensors, GPS trackers and alarm mats.

Simply the best? Making Leeds the best city to grow old in

MELANIE HENWOOD ASSOCIATES
2020

Research exploring the local strategic policy context for meeting the care and health need of older people in Leeds, and how the Leeds Neighbourhood Networks understand and contribute to the agenda. The Leeds Neighbourhood Network (LNN), comprised of 37 locally led ‘schemes’ operated by a number of voluntary sector organisations, provides preventative support to older people in order to enable them to continue living independently and participate in their communities. They assist with a range of services and activities that promote the independence, health and wellbeing of older people throughout Leeds. This paper outlines the number of opportunities and challenges the LNNs face within the strategic policy context, and looks at the potential for Leeds to share more widely the benefits of its approach and experience. It describes how the LNNs are firmly rooted in their local neighbourhoods and understand the needs and preferences of local citizens they are in touch with and suggests there is an opportunity for them to develop a more outward looking style and connect people to a much wider range of community assets and resources. Furthermore, the LNNs could be more closely involved in supporting self-management for people with long-term conditions, and for health practitioners to benefit from being able to access groups of people needing support with diabetes, or COPD, or similar chronic conditions. Among the challenges, the paper cites the extremely diverse nature of LNNs, the risk that other third sector organisations perceive their own contribution to be less valued, the need to constantly adjust and tailor the ‘offer’ to reflect the changing needs of the older population, the lack of synergy between the LNNs and partners, the difficulties in implementing and evidencing strengths and asset-based approaches and the uncertainty about future funding and the direction of government policy.

Promising approaches revisited: supplementary case studies

JOPLING Kate
2020

This supplement is a companion piece to the report Promising Approaches Revisited: Effective action on loneliness in later life. That report sets out the different elements needed for effective action to reduce loneliness. These case studies show the framework in action, illustrating how each element may work in practice. They cover: connectors services, including social prescribing; direct solution including group-based interventions and one-to-one approaches; gateway infrastructure such as digital technology and the built environment; and neighbourhood approaches.

The After Party evaluation report on a socially distanced care home project: March – July 2020

MAGIC ME
2020

This evaluation summarises outcomes for those involved in The After Party project, including care home residents and staff, volunteers, artists and staff from the care providers; and provides a short overview of Magic Me’s Cocktail in Care Homes (CICH) project, with a focus on the context of how The After Party began. The study also includes learning and suggestions for future work, in light of outcomes and learning from The After Party. For over 10 years Magic Me trained volunteers who were seeking connections with their local communities to come into their local care homes and have a party with residents. The After Party was developed as a way of keeping up the links with these key CICH sites during the pandemic, in place of the planned last few parties to mark the end of the CICH programme. Each month, After Party care partners received newsletters from Magic Me, which included artist actions and activities, alongside personalised messages from CICH Volunteers. After Party ‘care packages’ were sent via post by the artists, which included creative activities and resources, physical items, i.e. letters, artworks and/ or physical representations of artworks produced by volunteers and the wider public who have taken part in the creative activities throughout the month. They are physical mementos for residents, staff and the home/scheme. The evaluation found that Magic Me provided very easy to use care packages which met the needs of residents, were helpful to care staff, motivated volunteers and generated a great deal of happiness and interaction at a very difficult time. Benefits were felt by all involved. Although it was impossible to create the same sense of connection as when meeting face to face, it seems that The After Party managed to capture some of the energy and colour of the CICH parties and this was transferred into the online project.

Loneliness and social isolation interventions for older adults: a scoping review of reviews

FAKOYA Olujoke A., MCCORRY Noleen K., DONNELLY Michael
2020

Background: Loneliness and social isolation are growing public health concerns in our ageing society. Whilst these experiences occur across the life span, 50% of individuals aged over 60 are at risk of social isolation and one-third will experience some degree of loneliness later in life. The aim of this scoping review was to describe the range of interventions to reduce loneliness and social isolation among older adults that have been evaluated; in terms of intervention conceptualisation, categorisation, and components. Methods: Three electronic databases (CINAHL, Embase and Medline) were systematically searched for relevant published reviews of interventions for loneliness and social isolation. Inclusion criteria were: review of any type, published in English, a target population of older people and reported data on the categorisation of loneliness and/or social isolation interventions. Data extracted included: categories of interventions and the reasoning underpinning this categorisation. The methodology framework proposed by Arskey and O’Malley and further developed by Levac, et al. was used to guide the scoping review process. Results: A total of 33 reviews met the inclusion criteria, evaluating a range of interventions targeted at older people residing in the community or institutionalised settings. Authors of reviews included in this paper often used the same terms to categorise different intervention components and many did not provide a clear definition of these terms. There were inconsistent meanings attributed to intervention characteristics. Overall, interventions were commonly categorised on the basis of: 1) group or one-to-one delivery mode, 2) the goal of the intervention, and 3) the intervention type. Several authors replicated the categorisation system used in previous reviews. Conclusion: Many interventions have been developed to combat loneliness and social isolation among older people. The individuality of the experience of loneliness and isolation may cause difficulty in the delivery of standardised interventions. There is no one-size-fits-all approach to addressing loneliness or social isolation, and hence the need to tailor interventions to suit the needs of individuals, specific groups or the degree of loneliness experienced. Therefore, future research should be aimed at discerning what intervention works for whom, in what particular context and how.

Loneliness and isolation in long-term care and the COVID-19 pandemic

SIMARD Joyce, VOLICER Ladislav
2020

Editorial. In all countries affected by COVID-19, the message that is being sent by government officials and medical experts is “stay at home” and “isolate in place.” The isolation is especially difficult for people living in nursing homes and assisted living communities. This article provides some easy to implement ideas, with little or no cost or hiring additional staff, and can decrease the loneliness of residents in nursing homes or assisted living communities The article concludes that preventing loneliness in institutionalized persons is at least as important as helping them with personal hygiene. This is especially important during the COVID-19 pandemic when residents must be protected from contact with other individuals to reduce the risk of infection. Implementation of some of the strategies listed in this article requires education of staff members and supply of required items; however, this effort can significantly improve the quality of life of residents affected by pandemic restrictions.

Video calls for reducing social isolation and loneliness in older people: a rapid review (Review)

NOONE Chris, et al
2020

A rapid review to assess the effectiveness of video calls for reducing social isolation and loneliness in older adults. The review also sought to address the effectiveness of video calls on reducing symptoms of depression and improving quality of life. Selection criteria: Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and quasi‐RCTs (including cluster designs) were eligible for inclusion. Main results: Three cluster quasi-randomised trials, which together included 201 participants were included in this review. The included studies compared video call interventions to usual care in nursing homes. None of these studies were conducted during the COVID-19 pandemic. Each study measured loneliness using the UCLA Loneliness Scale. The evidence was very uncertain and suggests that video calls may result in little to no difference in scores on the Geriatric Depression Scale compared to usual care at three months' follow-up. Conclusion: Based on this review there is currently very uncertain evidence on the effectiveness of video call interventions to reduce loneliness in older adults. The review did not include any studies that reported evidence of the effectiveness of video call interventions to address social isolation in older adults. The evidence regarding the effectiveness of video calls for outcomes of symptoms of depression was very uncertain. Future research in this area needs to use more rigorous methods and more diverse and representative participants.

Results 1 - 10 of 338

#EXCLUDE#
News

Moving Memory

Moving Memory Practice example about how the Moving Memory Dance Theatre Company is challenging perceived notions of age and ageing.

Chatty Cafe Scheme

Chatty Cafe Scheme Practice example about how the Chatty Cafe Scheme is helping to tackle loneliness by bringing people of all ages together

Oomph! Wellness

Oomph! Wellness Practice example about how Oomph! Wellness is supporting staff to get older adults active and combat growing levels of social isolation

KOMP

KOMP Practice example about how KOMP, designed by No Isolation is helping older people stay connected with their families

LAUGH research project

LAUGH research project Practice example about a research project to develop highly personalised, playful objects for people with advanced dementia
View more: News
Related SCIE content
Related external content
Visit Social Care Online, the UK’s largest database of information and research on all aspects of social care and social work.
SEARCH NOW
Submit prevention service example
SUBMIT
#EXCLUDE#
#EXCLUDE#