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Results for 'older people'

Results 1 - 10 of 160

ConnectWELL

ConnectWELL

Introducing ConnectWELL - a social prescribing service – initially funded and piloted in 2014 by NHS Rugby CCG, which aims to improve health and wellbeing for patients and clients. ConnectWELL provides Health Professionals with just one, straightforward referral route to the many Voluntary and Community Sector organisations, groups and activities that can address underlying societal causes, manage or prevent compounding factors of ill-health. ConnectWELL has over 900 organisations and activities, ranging from Carers’ support, community groups, disability services, Faith / Religious / Cultural Activities, Housing / Homelessness Support, Mentoring, Music Groups, and volunteering opportunities.

The UTOPIA project: using telecare for older people in adults social care. The findings of a 2016-17 national survey of local authority telecare provision for older people in England

WOOLHAM John, et al
2018

This report describes how electronic assistive technology and telecare are used by local authorities in England to support older people. It is based on an online survey of local authority telecare managers to identify local authority’s aims when offering telecare to older people, the methods they use to assess whether their objectives are achieved, and how telecare is operationalised and delivered. The context of the research was to explore why the findings of the earlier the Whole System Demonstrator project - which found no evidence that telecare improved outcomes - have been overlooked by local authorities and policy makers, and whether there is other evidence that could account for WSD findings. The survey results found a third of local authorities used research evidence to inform telecare services and half were also aware of the Whole System Demonstrator. It also found that telecare is used in most local authorities to save money. Although there was some evidence of monitoring, there was no evidence of local authorities adopting agreed standards. The final section of the report provides suggestions for improving telecare service practice. They include the areas of using telecare as a substitute for social care; expanding the focus on telecare beyond risk management, safety and cost reduction; the impact of telecare on family members, carrying out effective assessments, and training.

Promising approaches to living well with dementia

JOPLING Kate
2017

This report provides a practical resource for individuals and organisations working in communities to support people living with dementia, and their carers to live well. Based on work by Age UK and Innovations in Dementia, the report looks beyond the traditional health and care services, to those which require a wider community response. It identifies promising approaches for supporting and enabling people with dementia and their carers in three key areas: personal wellbeing, positive relationships and active daily lives. It also proposes a framework to help understand these different approaches and the way they can be brought together in communities. This framework covers: Foundation services – which support people with dementia to access direct interventions; Direct interventions - to help support personal wellbeing, positive relationships, and active daily lives; Enabling services, which includes technology, transport and housing and care; and Structural factors - approaches in policy and practice which support effective development of appropriate services and systems., such as rights-based approaches and dementia friendly communities. Twenty five case studies are included to highlight the range of activity across the country. It makes recommendations for people with dementia and their carer, service providers and local authorities and health bodies involved with planning community responses to dementia.

Plymouth: local system review report

CARE QUALITY COMMISSION
2018

This local system review of Plymouth is one of 20 targeted reports to examine how older people move through the health and social care system, with a focus on the interfaces between services. It focuses on three key areas: maintaining the wellbeing of a person in their usual place of residence; crisis management; and step down, return to usual place of residence and/ or admission to a new place of residence. As well as analysis of local data, the review sought feedback from system leaders, people delivering care, and people who use services, their families and carers to examine whether services were: safe, effective, caring, responsive, and well led. The review found there was a shared ambition among system leaders for the integration of service delivery in Plymouth and a clear framework for interagency collaboration. It also found examples of staff working in an integrated way. However the experience of people receiving health and social care services was varied, with some negative experiences of discharge from hospital and missed opportunities to better utilise voluntary and community sector services in terms of maintaining people at home and avoiding hospital admission. Suggested areas for improvement include: more attention to commissioning for prevention and early intervention to improve sub optimal performance and the need for organisational development work to break down any organisational barriers and ensure there is a shared understanding among staff of their role in achieving integration at an operation level.

An independent review of Shared Lives for older people and people living with dementia

PPL, CORDIS BRIGHT, SOCIAL FINANCE
2018

Shared Lives is based around a Shared Lives carer sharing their home with an adult in need of care, to encourage meaningful relationships, independent living skills and community integration. This review explores how Shared Lives’ respite service for older people and people with dementia compare to ‘traditional’ forms of care for across three areas: outcomes for service users, carer and care commissioners; direct care costs to commissioners; and impact on the broader health system, such as a reduced usage. The review found that Shared Lives model provides positive outcomes for both service users and carers. It found that Shared Lives arrangements were able to reduce social isolation experience by carers and help increase their general wellbeing. Shared Lives also resulted in increased independence, wellbeing and choice for service users. In addition, the study found that the costs Shared Lives approach are similar to ‘traditional’ respite provision and provide an important option for commissioners. Appendices include details of calculations of the cost of providing Shared Lives respite care and day services; the results of a rapid evidence assessment on outcomes of 'traditional' respite care; and details of Healthcare service usage modelling.

Care and Health Improvement programme: efficiency project

LOCAL GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION
2018

This report provides practice examples from ten councils who took part in the Care and Health Improvement Programme during 2016/17. It describes the innovative approaches they took to achieve greater efficiencies from their adult social care budgets and draws conclusions as to what other councils might learn from them. The examples cover three main areas: managing demand for social care by offering residents a different type of service; more effectively using the capacity in communities to help find new care solutions; and working closer with partners in the NHS to reduce pressures in the care and health system. They highlight the importance of councils dealing with people effectively at their first point of contact; the benefits of using strength-based approaches; that developing social enterprises can be a cost effective way of meeting demand and reducing shortage of supply; and the potential of collaboration between councils to reduce costs and demand for services. The 10 councils are: Bristol City Council, Poole Borough Council, Swindon and Wiltshire Councils; Norfolk County Council; Waltham Forest Council; Somerset Council; Newcastle City Council; Nottingham City Council; and Nottinghamshire County Council.

Tackling loneliness and social isolation: the role of commissioners

HOLMES Pamela, THOMSON Lousia
2018

This briefing explores the opportunities and barriers faced by commissioners seeking to address loneliness and social isolation in older people. It identifies evidence that points the way to a better understanding of effective interventions to tackle loneliness and social isolation, provides examples of emerging practice across the country, and examines what needs to happen next to improve the commissioning environment, and the changes that need to happen in other parts of society. It draws on discussions from a seminar organised by SCIE and Renaisi attended by commissioners, local authorities and third sector representatives, as well as the findings from previous research and evaluation.

Mixing matters: how shared sites can bring older and younger people together and unite Brexit Britain

UNITED FOR ALL AGES
2018

Sets out why increasing connections between generations is key to the health, wellbeing and future of individuals, communities and the country. While Britain has become more age segregated in recent decades, this paper demonstrates there is a growing movement to tackle ‘age apartheid’. The paper focuses on how older and younger people can come together through ‘shared sites’ with many inspiring and practical examples that could be replicated across the UK. Four specific themes are explored: shared care and play; shared housing and living; shared learning and work; and shared community spaces and activities. The paper sets out an ambition to develop 500 shared sites by 2022, arguing that with some 75,000 care homes, nurseries and schools in the UK, there is massive scope for the shared sites challenge to achieve much more.

Comprehensive care: older people living with frailty in hospitals

NIHR DISSEMINATION CENTRE
2017

This review looks at the concept of 'frailty' in older people and what can be done to raise awareness amongst hospital staff, so that they can better identify and manage the needs of this ‘frail’ older people. It features 53 completed and ongoing studies funded by the National Institute of Health Research. The review covers four key aspects of caring for older people living with frailty in hospital: assessment; identifying and managing symptoms associated with frailty in hospital; discharge planning; and caring environments which consider the context in which inpatient diagnosis and treatment is delivered. The review highlights promising evaluations of workplace training and interventions. It also identifies a number of tools, such as the Frailty Index, that can help hospital staff to identify the severity of needs and help to provide targeted support. It also finds good evidence that the Comprehensive Geriatric Assessment (CGA) is a reliable way of diagnosing and meeting the needs of older people with input from multi-disciplinary teams. It also identifies areas where more research is needed, which include: maintaining activities of daily living for people admitted to hospital; and the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of different models of delivering care. The review also includes a series of questions that hospital boards, staff and families can ask about the care of older people with frailty in hospitals. Summaries of the 53 studies are also included.

Room to improve: the role of home adaptations in improving later life

CENTRE FOR AGEING BETTER
2017

This report summarises the findings from an evidence review on how home adaptations can improve later lives and provides recommendations to improve access to, and delivery of, home adaptation and repair services. It shows that both minor and major home adaptations are an effective intervention to improve outcomes for people in later life, including improved performance of everyday activities, improved mental health and preventing falls and injuries. It also identifies good evidence that greatest outcomes are achieved when individuals and families are involved in the decision-making process, and when adaptations focus on individual goals. Based on the findings, the report makes recommendations for commissioners and service provides. These include for Local Sustainability and Transformation partnerships to put in place preventative strategies to support people at risk in their home environment; for local authorities to make use of the Disabled Facilities Grant to fund both major and minor adaptations; and for local authorities to ensure people have access to information and advice on how home adaptations could benefit them, in line with the Care Act 2014.

Results 1 - 10 of 160

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