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Results for 'older people'

Results 1 - 10 of 330

ConnectWELL

ConnectWELL

Introducing ConnectWELL - a social prescribing service – initially funded and piloted in 2014 by NHS Rugby CCG, which aims to improve health and wellbeing for patients and clients. ConnectWELL provides Health Professionals with just one, straightforward referral route to the many Voluntary and Community Sector organisations, groups and activities that can address underlying societal causes, manage or prevent compounding factors of ill-health. ConnectWELL has over 900 organisations and activities, ranging from Carers’ support, community groups, disability services, Faith / Religious / Cultural Activities, Housing / Homelessness Support, Mentoring, Music Groups, and volunteering opportunities.

Video calls for reducing social isolation and loneliness in older people: a rapid review (Review)

NOONE Chris, et al
2020

A rapid review to assess the effectiveness of video calls for reducing social isolation and loneliness in older adults. The review also sought to address the effectiveness of video calls on reducing symptoms of depression and improving quality of life. Selection criteria: Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) and quasi‐RCTs (including cluster designs) were eligible for inclusion. Main results: Three cluster quasi-randomised trials, which together included 201 participants were included in this review. The included studies compared video call interventions to usual care in nursing homes. None of these studies were conducted during the COVID-19 pandemic. Each study measured loneliness using the UCLA Loneliness Scale. The evidence was very uncertain and suggests that video calls may result in little to no difference in scores on the Geriatric Depression Scale compared to usual care at three months' follow-up. Conclusion: Based on this review there is currently very uncertain evidence on the effectiveness of video call interventions to reduce loneliness in older adults. The review did not include any studies that reported evidence of the effectiveness of video call interventions to address social isolation in older adults. The evidence regarding the effectiveness of video calls for outcomes of symptoms of depression was very uncertain. Future research in this area needs to use more rigorous methods and more diverse and representative participants.

Falls Management Exercise implementation toolkit

NIHR CLAHRC. East Midlands, NATIONAL INSTITUTE FOR HEALTH RESEARCH
2020

This toolkit provides a suite of resources that commissioners can use to plan, implement and monitor the Falls Management Exercise (FaME) programme. FaME is an evidence-based tailored strength and balance exercise programme that has been shown to reduce the rate of falls, increase physical activity levels and improve wellbeing. The toolkit is an output of the PhISICAL study (Physical activity Implementation Study In Community-dwelling AduLts). Sections of the toolkit cover: Building the case for implementing FaME which includes evidence summaries for commissioners, a costing tool, a business case and real life case studies from FaME class participants; Planning the implementation of FaME, which includes an implementation Gantt chart, a service specification, example delivery models, videos, logic model and key learning from the PhISICAL study; Implementing the programme, which includes sample promotional materials and templates; and Monitoring, evaluation and quality improvement, which provides quality assurance guidance and suggested monitoring tools and schedule.

Signposting and navigation services for older people: economic evidence

BAUER Annette, et al
2019

Health, social care and other local government services can help ‘signpost’ or facilitate links to community and voluntary organisations that can help address social isolation and loneliness. This summary presents evidence on the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of signposting and navigation to tackle loneliness experienced by older people. It draws on evidence from a systematic review funded by The Campaign to End Loneliness. The evidence suggests that signposting and navigation services have the potential to achieve positive return on investments. However, evidence is restricted to a few small-scale studies and modelling. Further research is needed to test those findings.

Help-at-home for older people: economic evidence

BAUER Annette, TINELLI Michela, GUY Danielle
2019

This case summary provides economic evidence on Help-at-home schemes for older people, drawing on an economic evaluation of a scheme run by Age UK in England. Help-at-home schemes are usually run by voluntary and community organisations, and provide older people with a range of community support services to support older people living in their own homes. These services can include emotional, social, practical and financial support. Evidence from the evaluation suggests that Help-at-home schemes save local government and the NHS around £1500 per person per year, owing to people remaining longer in their homes, fewer GP appointments, and fewer hospital admissions. Volunteers providing support may also benefit, making them more likely to find jobs after gaining skills through volunteering. The summary notes that many of the benefits of help-at-home schemes are likely to depend on local infrastructures and how such schemes are run, making it hard to generalise their value.

British Red Cross 'Support at Home' hospital discharge scheme. A small-scale social care intervention: economic evidence

KNAPP Martin, et al
2019

This case summary presents economic evidence on British Red Cross 'Support at Home' hospital discharge scheme. Through the scheme volunteers offer short-term (4–12 week) practical and emotional support for older people recently discharged from the hospital. A British Red Cross evaluation of the schemes effectiveness identified benefits such as enabling safe discharge, supporting carers and enabling patient advocacy. The intervention costs an average £169 per person, including volunteer time. The programme led to savings from older people needing less help with daily activities and improvements in wellbeing. These savings amounted to £884 per person on average (costs are at 2011 price levels). The summary notes that the quality of evidence on the evaluation was not high due to a lack of control group.

Never too late: prevention in an ageing world

INTERNATIONAL LONGEVITY CENTRE UK
2020

This report explores how health care systems can better prevent ill health across people's lives, focusing on people interventions among those aged 50 and over. It presents analysis focussing on a small number of diseases where preventative interventions by healthcare systems could make a real difference to people’s health and wellbeing. These are cardiovascular, lung cancer, type 2 diabetes and HIV. It also considers the case of flu. It presents a snapshot of the potential burden and cost of these diseases, such as costs due to sick days, presenteeism and early retirement. It also provides brief overviews of preventative interventions, which have the potential to help people live healthier for longer. The analysis presented in the report shows that failure to invest in prevention will bring substantial social, health and economic costs. It argues that in order to follow through on commitments to prevention, governments need to improve access to preventative interventions to tackle growing health inequalities; encourage populations, professionals and policymakers to promote good health and prevent illness; and effectively utilise technology to deliver preventative interventions.

A qualitative evidence review of place and space, intangible assets and volunteering and participatory arts and sport or physical activity for enhancing wellbeing or alleviating loneliness across the adult lifecourse (16+ years)

MANSFIELD Louise, et al
2020

This review identifies evidence on the role of place and space in enhancing wellbeing or alleviating loneliness when taking part in participatory arts and sport or physical activity. The review looked at studies published worldwide between 2009 and 2019, found 59 sources. The qualitative studies included focus on understanding and conceptualising place and space, wellbeing and/or loneliness in participatory arts, sport or physical activity. In these studies, five key thematic areas and their findings have been identified: (i) belonging and identity in place and space (ii) places and spaces of community and locality, (iii) therapeutic and sensory spaces, (iv) safe spaces and (v) temporal aspects of place and space. These themes point to processes by which participatory arts and sport operate to enhance wellbeing and/or alleviate loneliness. Based on the findings, the review has high confidence that places and spaces and placemaking are important in enhancing wellbeing and potentially alleviating loneliness by creating a positive sense of belonging and identity, community and therapeutic or sensory experience in participatory arts, sport or physical activity. It has moderate confidence that places and spaces and placemaking are important in enhancing wellbeing by creating safe spaces for those facing physical or emotional harm via participatory arts, sport or physical activity. It has moderate confidence that the pattern and timing of activities in places and spaces for participatory arts, sport or physical activity i.e. when, how long, who with and what types of activity occur, have a positive influence of wellbeing.

Nine ways to connect your care home with the community: a guide for care homes

NATIONAL DEVELOPMENT FORUM FOR INCLUSION, TIMEBANKING UK
2020

This guide draws out some of the lessons from the final evaluation of Time to Connect, a project to help people living in care settings to play a greater part in the life of their community. It makes nine suggestions of ways for a care home to connect with its community, all based on based real-life examples. They include bringing in visiting services, such as leisure or health services; supporting residents to host their own guests and groups; strengthening existing contacts and creating new links in the community; and connecting and organising activities with other care homes.

Quick guide: falls prevention and management in care homes

NHS ENGLAND. North
2019

A guide to help care home staff to manage and prevent falls and risk of fractures, with an emphasis on person centred care and continuous improvement. It looks a preventing falls through activity and exercise; risk factors in falls, risk assessment and screening, management following a fall, and the importance of education. The guide includes key references to national falls prevention in care homes best practice and NICE quality standards. It also provides links to wider resources and tools. The resource can be used to benchmark existing policies and procedures with care homes to ensure the care given reflects evidence-based practice.

Results 1 - 10 of 330

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News

Moving Memory

Moving Memory Practice example about how the Moving Memory Dance Theatre Company is challenging perceived notions of age and ageing.

Chatty Cafe Scheme

Chatty Cafe Scheme Practice example about how the Chatty Cafe Scheme is helping to tackle loneliness by bringing people of all ages together

Oomph! Wellness

Oomph! Wellness Practice example about how Oomph! Wellness is supporting staff to get older adults active and combat growing levels of social isolation

KOMP

KOMP Practice example about how KOMP, designed by No Isolation is helping older people stay connected with their families

LAUGH research project

LAUGH research project Practice example about a research project to develop highly personalised, playful objects for people with advanced dementia
View more: News
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