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Results for 'older people'

Results 1 - 10 of 298

ConnectWELL

ConnectWELL

Introducing ConnectWELL - a social prescribing service – initially funded and piloted in 2014 by NHS Rugby CCG, which aims to improve health and wellbeing for patients and clients. ConnectWELL provides Health Professionals with just one, straightforward referral route to the many Voluntary and Community Sector organisations, groups and activities that can address underlying societal causes, manage or prevent compounding factors of ill-health. ConnectWELL has over 900 organisations and activities, ranging from Carers’ support, community groups, disability services, Faith / Religious / Cultural Activities, Housing / Homelessness Support, Mentoring, Music Groups, and volunteering opportunities.

Day centres for older people: a systematically conducted scoping review of literature about their benefits, purposes and how they are perceived

ORELLANA Katharine, MANTHORPE Jill, TINKER Anthea
2020

With a policy shift towards personalisation of adult social care in England, much attention has focused on individualised support for older people with care needs. This article reports the findings of a scoping review of United Kingdom (UK) and non-UK literature, published in English from 2005 to 2017, about day centres for older people without dementia and highlights the gaps in evidence. This review, undertaken to inform new empirical research, covered the perceptions, benefits and purposes of day centres. Searches, undertaken in October/November 2014 and updated in August 2017, of electronic databases, libraries, websites, research repositories and journals, identified 77 relevant papers, mostly non-UK. Day centres were found to play a variety of roles for individuals and in care systems. The largest body of evidence concerned social and preventive outcomes. Centre attendance and participation in interventions within them impacted positively on older people's mental health, social contacts, physical function and quality of life. Evidence about outcomes is mainly non-UK. Day centres for older people without dementia are under-researched generally, particularly in the UK. In addition to not being studied as whole services, there are considerable evidence gaps about how day centres are perceived, their outcomes, what they offer, to whom and their wider stakeholders, including family carers, volunteers, staff and professionals who are funding, recommending or referring older people to them.

Together in the 2020s: twenty ideas for creating a Britain for all ages by 2030

UNITED FOR ALL AGES
2020

This report presents 20 innovative ideas to bring older and younger people together and create a stronger society. The ideas cover three areas of public life: practical intergenerational projects, social and economic policies, and culture, media and sport. The report also highlights how intergenerational projects can change attitudes, improve older people’s health and care, tackle loneliness and increase trust and understanding between generations. The ideas include enabling more care homes to become community hubs; extending schools’ opening hours to provide community spaces for intergenerational activities; scaling up homesharing schemes for older and younger people; and the creation of a government department to join up and support intergenerational action. The recommendations draw on contributions from twenty five national and local organisations.

The intergenerational evaluation toolkit

JARROTT Shannon
2019

Intergenerational shared sites and intergenerational programmes that bring younger and older generations together can have many positive benefits. This Toolkit provides three resources to support programme providers and researchers to demonstrate the impact of intergenerational programming and the practices which achieve outcomes. The toolkit includes an Intergenerational Practice Evaluation tool to evaluate single intergenerational activities and the impact of programmes over time; a guide to planning an intergenerational evaluation; and a list of reliable outcome measures. The toolkit has been developed following 15 years of collaborative innovative practice and evaluation research.

Ageing Better in Camden: interim evaluation report

REMBISZEWSKI Perla, BIDEY Tim, VANSON Tim
2018

The first of two interim evaluation reports to explore the outcomes projects commissioned by Ageing Better in Camden (ABC), a six-year programme to address social isolation and loneliness in older people living in Camden. This report focuses on the progress of 8 projects, which include a Digital Inclusion project; North London Cares Intergenerational and Men’s Action projects; Community Action Projects, and LGBT+ Connect providing opportunities for older Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Trans people in Camden to socialise. Each project focused chapter includes details of participants, evidence of impact and individual case studies. The evaluation draws on qualitative data from conversations with project participants and project leads, as well as quantitative data from demographic surveys. Early findings suggest that the projects are achieving the anticipated positive impacts for older people. Positive impacts include: improved mental and physical well-being; new friendships and connections; improved confidence and independence; relationship building across communities and generations. The evaluation found that frontline staff played a key role in enabling participants to achieve positive impacts.

Connecting communities: housing at the heart of integrated health and social care in Scotland

HANOVER SCOTLAND
2019

A summary of findings from the Connecting Communities project, an action research project in a mix of amenity, sheltered and very sheltered Hanover housing developments in Scotland. The research aimed to understand what matters most to people living, visiting and working in Hanover housing. It also aimed to test out ways to build connectedness and increase wellbeing. The report describes the methodology used and sets out the lessons for the housing, health and care sectors. It also demonstrates how the organisation is using 'Five ways to Well-being' to improve the wellbeing of their residents. The five ways are: Connecting, Being active; Taking notice; Keep learning; and Giving to create a sense of purpose and belonging. Personal stories are used to illustrate the benefits of the approach. The findings show that home is fundamental to the well-being of people and the sustainability of communities. It makes recommendations for better engagement with older people when services are being developed and for a better understanding of the networks and supports which already exist in communities. The report highlights that housing associations should be fully included in the ongoing integration of health and care.

Is co-living a good choice to support healthy, happy ageing at home? Summary and conclusions

BURGESS Gemma
2019

A summary of research carried out by the Cambridge Centre for Housing and Planning Research to explore the extent to which co-living housing models might provide a good housing solution for people as they get older. Co-living is a form of housing that combines private living spaces with shared communal facilities, and explicitly seeks to promote social contact and build community. Models include cohousing communities where people live together in a community setting and homeshares, where an older person lives alongside a younger person. This research summary outlines some of the benefits and risks of co-living models.

Ageing better: working with older people to reduce social isolation and loneliness. A guide for Housing Associations

AGE BETTER IN SHEFFIELD
2019

A short guide providing evidence about what’s worked in reducing social isolation and homelessness among older people, focusing on work in the housing sector. It draws on lessons from some of the 14 partners who are delivering projects as part of the Ageing Better programme, which was funded by the National Lottery Community Fund. It identifies five key messages, which include for housing associations: to consider how they can strengthen their strategic and operational roles in addressing social isolation and loneliness; to develop an understand of local areas, mapping areas where older people are at most risk; to share their expertise in co-production to benefit local communities; and to consider further work with care homes for more long-term work to address loneliness and isolation. Although focusing on the housing sector, many of the themes identified have wider applicability to the design of any programmes seeking to reduce loneliness and isolation across all age groups.

The role of the visual arts in the resilience of people living with dementia in care homes

NEWMAN Andrew, et al
2019

This study responds to a gap in the literature relating to the resilience of people living with dementia in care homes. The research applied an ecopsychosocial framework of resilience, theorising that sources of resilience may be personal, social and structural. Visual arts enrichment activities were examined to see how they might provide opportunities for resilience. The data used for this study were qualitative and originated from people with dementia aged between 70 and 99 years old (N = 48) living in four care homes in North East England, United Kingdom and staff/carers/family members (N = 37). The results showed that visual arts enrichment activities supported the resilience of those with dementia through creative expression, increased communication, improved self-esteem, and influenced relationships with carers and family members. It is concluded that even those with advanced dementia are capable of demonstrating resilience which can be supported by, and explored through, visual arts enrichment activities.

Facilitators and barriers to autonomy: a systematic literature review for older adults with physical impairments, living in residential care facilities

van LOON Jolande, et al
2019

Autonomy is important in every stage of life. However, little is known about how autonomy is enhanced for older adults living in residential care facilities (RCFs). This leads to the research question: which facilitators and barriers to autonomy of older adults with physical impairments due to ageing and chronic health conditions living in RCFs are known? The results will be organised according to the framework of person-centred practice, because this is related to autonomy enhancement. To answer the research question, a systematic literature search and review was performed in the electronic databases CINAHL, PsycINFO, PubMed, Social Services Abstracts and Sociological Abstracts. Inclusion and exclusion criteria were derived from the research question. Selected articles were analysed and assessed on quality using the Mixed Methods Appraisal Tool. Facilitators and barriers for autonomy were found and arranged in four themes: characteristics of residents, prerequisites of professional care-givers, care processes between resident and care-giver, and environment of care. The established facilitators and barriers are relational and dynamic. For a better understanding of the facilitators and barriers to autonomy for older adults with physical impairments living in RCFs, a description is based on the 35 included articles. Autonomy is a capacity to influence the environment and make decisions irrespective of having executional autonomy, to live the kind of life someone desires to live in the face of diminishing social, physical and/or cognitive resources and dependency, and it develops in relationships. The results provide an actual overview and lead to a better understanding of barriers and facilitators for the autonomy of older adults with physical impairments in RCFs. For both residents and care-givers, results offer possibilities to sustain and reinforce autonomy. Scientifically, the study creates new knowledge on factors that influence autonomy, which can be used to enhance autonomy.

Results 1 - 10 of 298

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News

Moving Memory

Moving Memory Practice example about how the Moving Memory Dance Theatre Company is challenging perceived notions of age and ageing.

Chatty Cafe Scheme

Chatty Cafe Scheme Practice example about how the Chatty Cafe Scheme is helping to tackle loneliness by bringing people of all ages together

Oomph! Wellness

Oomph! Wellness Practice example about how Oomph! Wellness is supporting staff to get older adults active and combat growing levels of social isolation

KOMP

KOMP Practice example about how KOMP, designed by No Isolation is helping older people stay connected with their families

LAUGH research project

LAUGH research project Practice example about a research project to develop highly personalised, playful objects for people with advanced dementia
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