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Results for 'older people'

Results 1 - 10 of 182

ConnectWELL

ConnectWELL

Introducing ConnectWELL - a social prescribing service – initially funded and piloted in 2014 by NHS Rugby CCG, which aims to improve health and wellbeing for patients and clients. ConnectWELL provides Health Professionals with just one, straightforward referral route to the many Voluntary and Community Sector organisations, groups and activities that can address underlying societal causes, manage or prevent compounding factors of ill-health. ConnectWELL has over 900 organisations and activities, ranging from Carers’ support, community groups, disability services, Faith / Religious / Cultural Activities, Housing / Homelessness Support, Mentoring, Music Groups, and volunteering opportunities.

Effects of a museum-based social prescription intervention on quantitative measures of psychological wellbeing in older adults

THOMSON Linda J., et al
2018

Aims: To assess psychological wellbeing in a novel social prescription intervention for older adults called Museums on Prescription and to explore the extent of change over time in six self-rated emotions (‘absorbed’, ‘active’, ‘cheerful’, ‘encouraged’, ‘enlightened’ and ‘inspired’). Methods: Participants (n = 115) aged 65–94 years were referred to museum-based programmes comprising 10 weekly sessions, by healthcare and third sector organisations using inclusion criteria (e.g. socially isolated, able to give informed consent, not in employment, not regularly attending social or cultural activities) and exclusion criteria (e.g. unable to travel to the museum, unable to function in a group situation, unlikely to be able to attend all sessions, unable to take part in interviews and complete questionnaires). In a within-participants’ design, the Museum Wellbeing Measure for Older Adults (MWM-OA) was administered pre-post session at start-, mid- and end-programme. A total of 12 programmes, facilitated by museum staff and volunteers, were conducted in seven museums in central London and across Kent. In addition to the quantitative measures, participants, carers where present, museum staff and researchers kept weekly diaries following guideline questions and took part in end-programme in-depth interviews. Results: Multivariate analyses of variance showed significant participant improvements in all six MWM-OA emotions, pre-post session at start-, mid- and end-programme. Two emotions, ‘absorbed’ and ‘enlightened’, increased pre-post session disproportionately to the others; ‘cheerful’ attained the highest pre-post session scores whereas ‘active’ was consistently lowest. Conclusion: Museums can be instrumental in offering museum-based programmes for older adults to improve psychological wellbeing over time. Participants in the study experienced a sense of privilege, valued the opportunity to liaise with curators, visit parts of the museum closed to the public and handle objects normally behind glass. Participants appreciated opportunities afforded by creative and co-productive activities to acquire learning and skills, and get to know new people in a different context.

Social isolation and older black, Asian and minority ethnic people in Greater Manchester

LEWIS Camilla, COTTERELL Natalie
2018

This report summarises the existing literature on social isolation among older black, Asian and minority ethnic (BAME) communities in the UK, including the risk and protective factors of social isolation. It argues that individuals from minority ethnic backgrounds are more likely to experience health, social, and economic inequalities, thereby increasing the risk of social isolation. BAME individuals are more likely to experience discrimination and racism over the course of their lives, which can also increase the risk of social isolation by limiting opportunities for social and economic participation. It also highlights the role cultural and community organisations can play in facilitating access to services and raising awareness about ways of preventing social isolation. It discusses the findings in relation to Greater Manchester's Ambition for Ageing programme and suggests how older BAME communities could be be engaged across Greater Manchester, using co-research methodologies. It concludes that future research must acknowledge variations across and within BAME groups, as well as exploring other factors, including existing gender and class differences.

What is the impact on health and wellbeing of interventions that foster respect and social inclusion in community-residing older adults? A systematic review of quantitative and qualitative studies

RONZI S., et al
2018

Background: Many interventions have been developed to promote respect and social inclusion among older people, but the evidence on their impacts on health has not been synthesised. This systematic review aims to appraise the state of the evidence across the quantitative and qualitative literature. Methods: Eligible studies published between 1990 and 2015 were identified by scanning seven bibliographic databases using a pre-piloted strategy, searching grey literature and contacting experts. Studies were included if they assessed the impact (quantitatively) and/or perceived impact (qualitatively) of an intervention promoting respect and social inclusion on the physical or mental health of community-residing people aged 60 years and older. Titles and abstracts were screened for eligibility by one reviewer. A second reviewer independently screened a 10% random sample. Full texts were screened for eligibility by one reviewer, with verification by another reviewer. Risk of bias was assessed using standardised tools. Findings were summarised using narrative synthesis, harvest plots and logic models to depict the potential pathways to health outcomes. Results: Of the 27,354 records retrieved, 40 studies (23 quantitative, 6 qualitative, 11 mixed methods) were included. All studies were conducted in high and upper middle-income countries. Interventions involved mentoring, intergenerational and multi-activity programmes, dancing, music and singing, art and culture and information-communication technology. Most studies (n = 24) were at high or moderate risk of bias. Music and singing, intergenerational interventions, art and culture and multi-activity interventions were associated with an overall positive impact on health outcomes. This included depression (n = 3), wellbeing (n = 3), subjective health (n = 2), quality of life (n = 2), perceived stress and mental health (n = 2) and physical health (n = 2). Qualitative studies offered explanations for mediating factors (e.g. improved self-esteem) that may lead to improved health outcomes and contributed to the assessment of causation. Conclusions: Whilst this review suggests that some interventions may positively impact on the health outcomes of older people, and identified mediating factors to health outcomes, the evidence is based on studies with heterogeneous methodologies. Many of the interventions were delivered as projects to selected groups, raising important questions about the feasibility of wider implementation and the potential for population-wide benefits.

Preventive interventions for the second half of life: a systematic review

HAJAT Cother, et al
2018

Objective: Recent improvements in life expectancy globally require intensified focus on noncommunicable diseases and age-related conditions. The purpose of this article is to inform the development of age-specific prevention guidelines for adults aged 50 and above, which are currently lacking. Data Source: PubMed, Cochrane database, and Google Scholar and explicit outreach to experts in the field. Study Inclusion and Exclusion Criteria: Meta-analyses, intervention-based, and prospective cohort studies that reported all-cause mortality, disease-specific mortality, or morbidity in adults were included. Data Extraction: A systematic review was undertaken in 2015 using search terms of a combination of and “intervention,” “mortality,” “reduction,” “improvement,” “death,” and “morbidity.” Data Synthesis: Interventions were categorized according to the Center for Evidence-Based Medicine Level of Evidence framework. Results: A summary table reports for each intervention the impact, strength of evidence, initiation, duration, and details of the intervention. Age-decade-specific preventive recommendations have been proposed relating to physical activity, diet, tobacco and alcohol use, medication adherence, screening and vaccination, and mental and cognitive health. Conclusion: Clear recommendations have been made according to the existing evidence base, but further research investment is needed to fill the many gaps. Further, personalized approaches to healthy aging complemented by population-wide approaches and broader cross-sector partnerships will help to ensure greater longevity is an opportunity, rather than a burden, for society.

Creative and cultural activities and wellbeing in later life

ARCHER Libby, et al
2018

This report explores the benefits of participating in creative and cultural activities for wellbeing in later life. It discusses what creative and cultural participation means and the types of activities people take part in, such as dance, craft, literary activities, music and historical activities. It also looks at the factors that can help people get involved and how levels of involvement can differ depending on people’s overall level of wellbeing. It includes examples of initiatives for older people, including Independent Arts’ participatory arts Time & Tide project and Out in the City’, a social initiative for lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender people over 50. It concludes with recommendations for practitioners and policymakers.

Roots and Shoots

SMART Cranleigh

SMART Cranleigh is an innovative community led programme that takes a place-based approach to health and wellbeing. Whilst the goal is to support the wellbeing of all villagers; the impetus for the programme came in part from the realisation that traditional health and social care services were not alone able to meet the needs of people of all ages in a large and fast growing rural village. Specifically they were not adequately meeting the needs of the significant and increasing number of older people within the community.

What works for wellbeing? A systematic review of wellbeing outcomes for music and singing in adults

DAYKIN Norma, et al
2018

Aims: The role of arts and music in supporting subjective wellbeing (SWB) is increasingly recognised. Robust evidence is needed to support policy and practice. This article reports on the first of four reviews of Culture, Sport and Wellbeing (CSW) commissioned by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC)-funded What Works Centre for Wellbeing (https://whatworkswellbeing.org/). Objective: To identify SWB outcomes for music and singing in adults. Methods: Comprehensive literature searches were conducted in PsychInfo, Medline, ERIC, Arts and Humanities, Social Science and Science Citation Indexes, Scopus, PILOTS and CINAHL databases. From 5,397 records identified, 61 relevant records were assessed using GRADE and CERQual schema. Results: A wide range of wellbeing measures was used, with no consistency in how SWB was measured across the studies. A wide range of activities was reported, most commonly music listening and regular group singing. Music has been associated with reduced anxiety in young adults, enhanced mood and purpose in adults and mental wellbeing, quality of life, self-awareness and coping in people with diagnosed health conditions. Music and singing have been shown to be effective in enhancing morale and reducing risk of depression in older people. Few studies address SWB in people with dementia. While there are a few studies of music with marginalised communities, participants in community choirs tend to be female, white and relatively well educated. Research challenges include recruiting participants with baseline wellbeing scores that are low enough to record any significant or noteworthy change following a music or singing intervention. Conclusions: There is reliable evidence for positive effects of music and singing on wellbeing in adults. There remains a need for research with sub-groups who are at greater risk of lower levels of wellbeing, and on the processes by which wellbeing outcomes are, or are not, achieved.

Building relationships between the generations: the case of the co-located nursery

NIGHTINGALE HAMMERSON
2018

This case study describes the development of the UK’s first intergenerational nursery, a partnership between the Apples and Honey Nursery group and the Jewish elderly care home charity Nightingale Hammerson. It covers the different stages of the project, from the initial idea, building community support and setting up a weekly intergenerational baby and toddler group in January 2017, to opening a day nursery within the grounds in September 2017, where intergenerational sessions between nursery children and care home residents take place daily. The report includes feedback from the first year of the intergenerational programme, including the views of families who attend the baby and toddler group, residents of the care home, volunteers, physiotherapists, parents from the new nursery, and staff from both organisations. It also includes early lessons learned as a result of including nursery children into weekly exercise classes with residents and observations from early year's teachers as to the impact of intergenerational play on the very young and those with dementia.

Volunteer peer support and befriending for carers of people living with dementia: an exploration of volunteers’ experiences

SMITH Raymond, et al
2018

With ageing populations and greater reliance on the voluntary sector, the number of volunteer‐led peer support and befriending services for carers of people with dementia in England is set to increase. However, little is known about the experiences of the volunteers who deliver these interventions, many of whom are former carers. Using in‐depth semi‐structured interviews with 10 volunteer peer supporters and befrienders, this exploratory study investigated volunteers’ experiences of delivering the support, the types of relationships they form with carers and their perceptions of its impact upon them and on carers. Data were analysed using framework analysis. Findings showed that volunteers benefitted from their role due to the ‘two‐way’ flow of support. Experiential similarity and having common interests with carers were considered important to the development of mutually beneficial relationships. Volunteers perceived that carers gained emotional and social support, which in turn improved the carers’ coping ability. Being able to see positive changes to carers’ lives was important for volunteers to gain enjoyment and satisfaction from their role. However, volunteers also identified challenges with their role, such as dealing with carers’ emotions. Future research should investigate ways of reducing potential burden on volunteers and explore the impact of volunteering specifically on former carers of people with dementia.

Results 1 - 10 of 182

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