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Results for 'older people'

Results 1 - 10 of 210

ConnectWELL

ConnectWELL

Introducing ConnectWELL - a social prescribing service – initially funded and piloted in 2014 by NHS Rugby CCG, which aims to improve health and wellbeing for patients and clients. ConnectWELL provides Health Professionals with just one, straightforward referral route to the many Voluntary and Community Sector organisations, groups and activities that can address underlying societal causes, manage or prevent compounding factors of ill-health. ConnectWELL has over 900 organisations and activities, ranging from Carers’ support, community groups, disability services, Faith / Religious / Cultural Activities, Housing / Homelessness Support, Mentoring, Music Groups, and volunteering opportunities.

Occupational therapy fall prevention interventions for community-dwelling older adults: a systematic review

ELLIOTT Sharon, LELAND Natalie E.
2018

OBJECTIVE: Accidental falls among community-dwelling older adults are preventable and increase the risk of morbidity, hospitalization, and institutionalization. We updated and broadened a 2008 systematic review examining the evidence for the effectiveness of fall prevention interventions in improving fall-related outcomes, occupational performance, quality of life, and health care facility readmissions for community-dwelling older adults., METHOD: Literature published from 2008 to 2015 from five electronic databases was searched and analysed, RESULTS: Fifty articles met the inclusion criteria and were critically appraised and synthesized-37 provided Level I; 5, Level II; and 8, Level III evidence. Analysis was organized into four intervention themes: single component, multicomponent, multifactorial, and population based. Mixed evidence was found for single-component and multifactorial interventions, strong evidence was found for multicomponent interventions, and moderate evidence was found for population-based interventions., CONCLUSION: These findings can inform the delivery and integration of fall prevention interventions from acute care to community discharge.Copyright © 2018 by the American Occupational Therapy Association, Inc.

Evaluation of the Homeshare pilots: final report

TRAVERSE, MACMILLAN Tarran, et al
2018

The final evaluation report of Homeshare pilots programme (HSP), which looks at what works to develop a sustainable Homeshare scheme. Homeshare schemes bring together older people who need support to stay in their homes, with young people who provide companionship and low level support in return for an affordable place to live. The evaluation, commissioned by SCIE and conducted by Traverse, identifies which approaches and activities work best, barriers to successful schemes, cost and benefits, and identifies factors that to be used by commissioners to assess bids for Homeshare schemes. It draws on qualitative interviews with pilot leads and staff, local authority stakeholders, referral agencies and with householders and homesharers from the first matches achieved in three HSP sites. It covers experiences of living in a Homeshare, operating a sustainable Homeshare scheme, referral and sustainability, and highlights broader learning for the social care and housing sectors. The results show how that Homeshare can reduce loneliness and improve wellbeing by offering companionship and facilitating inter-generational relationships, as well as addressing the lack of affordable housing options. The report concludes that the programme has been successful in supporting the development of Homeshare sites and provided learning in what works in supporting innovation within delivery of social and housing support.

The state of play: Arts and Older People programme

ARTS COUNCIL OF NORTHERN IRELAND
2018

Summary findings on the impact of the Arts and Older People Programme in Northern Ireland, which aims to provide older people with the opportunity to participate in arts activities that contribute to their health and wellbeing. The programme - which is jointly funded by ACNI, the Baring Foundation and the Public Health Agency - targets poverty, isolation and loneliness and provides opportunities for social interaction to help build confidence and resilience. The report provides details of the programme impact against the agreed performance indicators of: isolation and loneliness, social inclusion, poverty, health/dementia, and strengthening the voice of older people. Includes short case study examples of the initiatives.

Social isolation, loneliness and older people

SMITH Lauren
2018

A literature review on social isolation, loneliness and older people. The review provides citations and short summaries of the literature identified, covering the following themes: the community context, research around interventions, social capital, mental wellbeing, mobility and wellbeing, social inclusion and community building, digital engagement and evaluating interventions. The majority of articles included are systematic reviews and literature reviews. The review was commissioned by an alliance of older people’s forums to contribute to their response to the Scottish Government's draft strategy 'A connected Scotland: tackling social isolation and loneliness and building stronger communities'. It is not comprehensive but aims to provide links to perspectives from academic research that may be less commonly present within contributions to consultations.

What do we know about the relationship between internet-mediated interaction and social isolation and loneliness in later life?

BENEITO-MONTAGUT Roser, CASSIAN-YDE Nizaia, BEGUERIA Arantza
2018

Purpose: Social isolation and loneliness are recognised social, health and wellbeing problems that particularly affect later life. They have been the subject of many recent studies. Studies examining the role of the internet in addressing these problems have multiplied. However, it is still not known whether internet-mediated social interaction has any role in mitigating social isolation and or loneliness. To address this gap, the purpose of this paper is to review previous research that investigates the relationship between internet use for communication and social isolation and loneliness. Design/methodology/approach: This paper reviews the empirical literature published since 2000 and expands on previous literature reviews by including a variety of research designs and disciplines. Findings: Despite the recent increase in studies, there is still little evidence to show internet effects on social isolation and loneliness. It is concluded that future research programmes aimed at reducing them by the use of the internet should include more robust methodological and theoretical frameworks, employ longitudinal research designs and provide a more nuanced description of both the social phenomena (social isolation and loneliness) and internet-mediated social interaction. Originality/value: Previous reviews are not restricted to internet-based studies and include several types of interventions aiming at reducing social isolation and/or loneliness. They do not attempt to disentangle the internet effects of social isolation and loneliness.

Tackling loneliness: briefing

WHAT WORKS CENTRE FOR WELLBEING
2018

Based on a systematic review of evidence reviews, this briefing summarises the evidence on what works in alleviating loneliness in people aged 55 years and older. A total of 364 reviews were identified and 28 were included in the final review. The review found there is a need for greater clarity on the concept of loneliness and how it differs from social isolation, for both researchers and practitioners. Other key findings show that there is no one-size fits-all approach to alleviating loneliness in older population groups and that tailored approaches are more likely to reduce loneliness. A number of different approaches are being used to alleviate loneliness in older adults. These include: leisure activities; therapies; social and community interventions; educational approaches; befriending; and system-wide activities, such as changing the cultures of care. There was no evidence of approaches doing any harm, however there was a suggestion that some technology-based approaches are not suitable for everyone and could reinforce a sense of social isolation. Suggestions are made on how to improve the evidence-based on interventions for loneliness. The briefing also provides a case study of Community Webs, a project to reduce loneliness and social isolation of patients presenting to GP practices by mobilising community assets.

An overview of reviews: the effectiveness of interventions to address loneliness at all stages of the life-course

VICTOR Christina, et al
2018

This systematic review of reviews examines the effectiveness of interventions to alleviate loneliness. Searches retrieved 364 evidence reviews for screening. The final review provides a synthesis of 14 reviews and 14 unpublished grey literature, focused on assessing interventions to alleviate loneliness. The material included is International and from within the UK. All published and grey literature studies included focus on older people. Key findings show that there is no one-size fits-all approach to alleviating loneliness in older population groups and that tailored approaches are more likely to reduce loneliness. A number of different approaches are being used to alleviate loneliness in older adults. These include: leisure activities; therapies; social and community interventions; educational approaches; befriending; and system-wide activities, such as changing the cultures of care. There was no evidence of approaches doing any harm, however there was a suggestion that some technology-based approaches are not suitable for everyone and could reinforce a sense of social isolation. A wide variety of loneliness measures were used, and the concept of loneliness was not clearly defined, with the terms loneliness and social isolation often used interchangeably. The results from controlled study designs in community settings and care homes showed no effect of interventions on loneliness. However, the review notes that loneliness is seldom reported as a primary outcome in the published literature. The review makes a number of recommendations for policy.

'My nature' - an effective tool for residential care

BREWIN Wendy, ORR Noreen, GARSIDE Ruth
2018

Experiencing nature is increasingly recognised as having a positive impact on the health and wellbeing of older people living in care homes. This practice example of "My Nature" activities toolkit designed to solve the problem of access to green spaces, which can be difficult for older people with dementia in care homes. Sensory Trust and the University of Exeter collaborated on developing 'My Nature', an evidence based training toolkit to help care staff identify ways in which nature can not only play a role in a resident's care plan but also support them in their work. The toolkit consists of: evidence booklets, nature based activities and a wall chart. The toolkit was piloted and then evaluated to see how far it could achieve the health and wellbeing gains that access to nature can provide. Two care homes in Cornwall participated in the pilot. Activities demonstrated in the pilots include: nature palettes, nature mapping, painting by nature and a tea tasting party. Key findings from the evaluation: the activities succeeded in getting residents out into the gardens and also stimulated interaction, enjoyment and pleasure. For staff, the activities proved to be adaptable to different contexts, could be planned in advanced and person-centred. Challenges identified include: the activities did not appear to appeal to male residents and care home culture.

Ageing Better: national evaluation short Learning Report – July 2018

CAMPBELL Diarmid, COX Korina
2018

Shares learning from the 14 partners of the Ageing Better programme, which aim to support people aged over 50 who are experiencing, or at risk of, social isolation and loneliness. The report draws on surveys of programme participants, visits to each of the 14 programme areas, and feedback from stakeholders from the partnerships. It reports that. to date, Ageing Better partnerships have worked with approximately 70,000 participants and 13,250 volunteers. The report also shows how Ageing Better, participants are, on average, less socially isolated and lonely, taking a more active role in their communities, have improved health and wellbeing, and are getting involved in delivering and designing projects. It also highlights benefits for volunteers and how Ageing Better is helping organisations improve partnership working and increasing skills, capacity and knowledge among participants helping to deliver and design programmes. Links to the partnership websites are also included.

Results 1 - 10 of 210

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LAUGH research project

LAUGH research project New practice example about a research project to develop highly personalised, playful objects for people with advanced dementia
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