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Results for 'older people'

Results 101 - 110 of 147

Promising approaches: to reducing loneliness and isolation in later life

JOPLING Kate
2015

This report raises concerns that loneliness and social isolation among older people is becoming a serious public health issue. It draws on the views of experts and research evidence to set out a new framework for understanding and tackling loneliness in older people. The approach is based around three key challenges: reaching individuals; understanding the specific circumstances of an individual's loneliness; and supporting individuals to take up services that would help. Sections of the report cover: the foundation services (reaching, understanding and supporting individuals); the types of intervention that are most likely to meet older people's need for social contact; how technology and transport can facilitate social connection; and 'structural enablers' focusing on how services are delivered (i.e., at neighbourhood level, community development, volunteering, and age positive approaches). It also highlights areas where a greater understanding of how to address loneliness within the older community is needed: within care settings; in black and minority ethnic groups; and with lesbian, gay, bisexual and trans older people. Case studies are used throughout to demonstrate the variety of solutions needed to address a very personal and individual problem. Includes specific recommendations for service providers, commissioners and those involved with search.

Preventing loneliness and social isolation in older people

COLLINS Emma
2014

This Insight looks specifically at the prevention of isolation and loneliness amongst older people, with a particular focus on what practitioners in the fields of health and social care should bear in mind when working to tackle this important and growing issue. It highlights the findings from past research and and evidence about what works, summarises the key characteristics of successful interventions, looks at how they relate to the prevention agenda, and the particular role health and social care professionals can play.

Contact the Elderly Tea Parties

Contact the Elderly

Contact the Elderly organise monthly Sunday afternoon tea parties for small groups of older people , aged 75 and over, who live alone.

Thurrock Local Area Co-ordination

Thurrock Council

Local Area Coordination helps vulnerable people in Thurrock find support in their local communities. It forms part of Thurrock's Building Positive Futures programme, which aims to support older and vulnerable people to live well; to increase their health and wellbeing; improve housing and neighbourhoods and create stronger, more hospitable and age-friendly communities. LAC was selected as an approach because more than 20 years of evaluation of its use in Western Australia has shown it to lead to positive outcomes for individuals, build community resilience and reduce demand for formal services.

STEPS to Stay Independent

East Sussex County Council

STEPS to Stay Independent is a short term housing support service provided to older people in East Sussex, enabling them to retain or regain independent living skills so they can continue to live in their own home or move to one that better meets their needs. It is part of the Supporting People programme in East Sussex, alongside another preventative programme Home Works, and extra care and supported housing.

Support at Home

British Red Cross

British Red Cross (BRC) Support at Home services offer short-term practical and emotional support at home to help people regain their independence following a stay in hospital. Evaluations of Red Cross preventative services have found that these services improved the quality of life for people who use services, contributed to cost savings and a reduction in use of formal/informal care.

Neighbourhood Network Schemes (NNS)

Leeds City Council

Neighbourhood Network Schemes (NNS) are community based, locally led organisations that enable older people over 60 across Leeds to live independently and to take an active role within their own communities. Most are small, independent organisations run largely by and for older people, and many have a significant amount of input from volunteers drawn from the local community.

Community Bridge Builders

Halton Borough Council

The Community Bridge Building team is a generic service and Bridge Builders work with adults who have a disability and are socially isolated to connect them with services in their communities. It began in 2007 when adult day care services were restructured, moving from a day centre model (two centres in Widnes and Runcorn) to one where people are supported to take part in activities and voluntary roles in the community. Day services now support only those with the most complex needs. Community Bridge Builders aim to: promote wellbeing and healthy living; encourage equal opportunities for all; identify support needs and overcome them; enable people to make their own choices; promote Independence and reduce isolation; enable people to have a valued role within their community.

Sure Start to Later Life

Halton Borough Council

Following workshops held with older people, who said they wanted an information service specifically aimed at them and that that they wanted information officers to make home visits, Halton Borough Council worked with them to create this service, based on a previous national model.

Going home alone: counting the cost to older people and the NHS

ROYAL VOLUNTARY SERVICE
2014

Assesses the impact of home from hospital services, which focus on supporting older people in their homes following a stay in hospital and seek to reduce the likelihood that they will need to be readmitted to hospital. The report brings together the findings of a literature review (as well as discussions with relevant experts), the results of the survey of 401 people aged 75 or over who had spent at least one night in hospital on one or more occasions within the past five years, and the outputs from a cost-impact analysis using national data and results from the survey. It sets out the policy context in England, Scotland and Wales, with its focus on preventive care, better integration of health and care services, and on shifting care away from the hospital into homes and communities. It then discusses the demand drivers for these schemes, including the ageing population, the growth in hospital readmissions, and decreasing length of stay. The report examines the experiences of older people after leaving hospital, looking at admissions, discharge, need for support following discharge, and type and duration of support. It suggests that home from hospital schemes can help to improve the well-being of their users and to reduce social isolation and loneliness and the number of hospital readmissions, as well as demand for other health and care services. The results of the cost-impact analysis suggest that, were home from hospital schemes appropriately targeted and effective in addressing ‘excess admissions’, they may produce a saving for the NHS of £40.4m per year.

Results 101 - 110 of 147

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