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Results for 'older people'

Results 111 - 120 of 147

For future living: innovative approaches to joining up housing and health

DAVIES Bill
2014

Examines older people’s expectations from their housing and housing providers and the choices the UK housing market currently offers older and vulnerable people, and explores innovative housing and care solutions that could meet the demands of an ageing population and more widely support people with other social needs. The study drew on both quantitative surveys and qualitative interviews undertaken in previous research to establish what older groups need and expect from the housing market, and then used statistical methods to create a clear picture of the housing that older people inhabit now and the choices that the English housing market offers to them. Having established that the market presents only a limited range of options to older people, the research explored the international literature to identify different models of housing and support, focusing on countries that face similar demographic challenges. The report considers ideas that could potentially be adopted in England and adapted to an English housing and health context. A number of options were tested with two focus groups, involving over-55s and over-65s. Finally, based on the information drawn from the research, and through consultation with external experts, this report outlines a range of possible policy measures designed to ensure that the current and future stock of housing for older people is more effectively focused on supporting their health requirements.

Wiltshire Council: help to live at home service: an outcome-based approach to social care: case study report

OXFORD BROOKES UNIVERSITY. Institute of Public Care
2012

The case study describes the process that Wiltshire Council has used to develop its new ‘Help to Live at Home Service’ for older people and others who require help to remain at home. The approach focused on the outcomes that the older people wish to gain from social care. It involved a complete overhaul of the social care system from the role of the social worker working alongside the customer to determine the required outcomes to the role of the providers of the service who must deliver these outcomes and receive payment based on that delivery. The report aims to promote discussion about how outcomes-based, personalised support can best work in social care in England in the future.

Improving later life: services for older people: what works

AGE UK
2014

This report presents jargon-free summaries of research on key aspects of services for older people, each written by experts in their field. It also draws out seven major themes from the research covering service design, the role of carers, the need for regular assessment, and the importance of social interaction. Contributors cover the following areas: service cost-effectiveness, what works in integrating health and care, dignity of older service users, safeguarding, supporting older people and their carers, council managed personal budgets, paying for social care, involving older people in evaluation and research, preventing isolation and loneliness, promoting inclusion in rural communities, housing with care, home telecare, supporting older people in the community, services for men, falls prevention, assistive technology for people with dementia, cognitive stimulation therapy for people with dementia, and memory services.

An analysis of the economic impacts of the British Red Cross Support at home service

DIXON Josie, et al
2014

This independent economic evaluation of the British Red Cross Support at Home service focuses on four services which were found to improve outcomes in an earlier British Red Cross evaluation. The services all aim to help people to build their confidence and regain their independence during times of particular difficulty.Those evaluated were 'Next Steps', where volunteers provide home visits and monitor how people are coping following hospital discharge; 'Care in the Home' services delivered by staff and volunteers providing social visits, support and help with household tasks; and a Neighbourhood/Community service in Scotland which focused on linking people to existing services and volunteer-led services such as befriending. The final sample for this analysis consisted of a total of 52 people, the majority of who were over 65. Two outcomes were used in the economic analysis: an increased ability to manage daily activities and improved wellbeing. The evaluation identified cost savings that were related to a reduced need for formal/ informal care and general help around the home; a reduced risk of falls and malnutrition, particularly amongst those with unmet care needs; and, to a lesser degree, a reduced need for treatment of depressive symptoms. The total savings identified amounted to more than five times the cost of the service. The average cost of the intervention was £169 per person (based on the services and sample data in the Red Cross evaluation) and the identified savings came to £880 per person.

Tracking your preventative spend: a step-by-step guide

WILKES Laura
2013

This toolkit helps councils to have a clearer understanding of how much of their budget is spent on prevention, how this contributes to the delivery of outcomes and what this means for increasing their activity towards early action programmes. It sets out the five steps to mapping and analysing spend: establishing a project sponsor and steering group; identifying and agreeing aims, objectives and scope of the project; understanding the outcome; mapping preventative services for the chosen outcome; and analysing and mapping budgets. It covers the practical steps taken and the outputs and challenges of each step. The toolkit draws on work carried out by the British Red Cross with the LGiU and Mears to support Camden Council to track their preventative spend against one of the council’s key outcomes from the Adult Social Care Outcomes Framework: to keep older people living independently for longer. The toolkit provides a useful resource for councils, health and wellbeing boards and clinical commissioning groups.

Lifestyles in later life: identity, choice and stigma: AKTIVE working paper 5

HAMBLIN Kate
2014

This paper explores the identities and lifestyle choices of older people participating in the AKTIVE study and considers how telecare can support the maintenance of independence and preferred identities. Focusing on older people living at home with different types of frailty, the AKTIVE project aimed both to enhance understanding of how they (and those supporting them) accessed, engaged with and used the telecare equipment supplied to them, and to explore the consequences for them of doing so. The paper focuses on strategies and situations which enable older people to retain important elements of their identity, including their attachment to home and good relations within families. It also examines the circumstances in which telecare can be a source of stigma for older people, compromising self-perceptions and viewed as a sign of dependency. The paper draws on research evidence about who the older people in the AKTIVE study felt they ‘really are’. Using three key concepts, ‘identity’, ‘choice’ and ‘stigma’, it explores the subjective realities older people shared in talk and interactions during research visits over six to nine months in 2012-13 and outlines the ‘identity-management strategies’, which are conceptualised as a form of resilience, used by older people to maintain or protect cherished elements of their identities and the role of telecare in these choices, behaviours and strategies.

Investing to save: assessing the cost-effectiveness of telecare: summary report

CLIFFORD Paul, et al
2012

This summary report describes the findings of a project evaluating the potential cost savings arising from the use of telecare. Another aim was to develop a methodology that will support routine evaluation and comparison of the cost-effectiveness of local telecare implementations. Evaluation was made of the suitability of telecare for 50 clients for whom Overview Assessments had been completed by FACE Recording & Measuring Systems Ltd. Where telecare appeared suitable, the social care costs of meeting the client’s needs before and after provision of telecare were estimated. Estimates were also made of the total savings achievable by the deployment of telecare. Out of the 50 cases, 33 were identified as potentially benefitting from telecare. The average weekly cost of telecare was £6.25, compared to £167 for the average weekly care package for the sample pre-telecare. The results confirmed previous studies showing that very substantial savings are achievable through the widespread targeted use of telecare. Potential savings lie in the range of £3m to £7.8m for a typical council, or 7.4-19.4% of total older people’s social care budget.

Frail older people and their networks of support: how does telecare fit in?: AKTIVE Working paper 2

YEANDLE Sue
2014

This paper focuses on the different types and configurations of formal and informal support in place, alongside telecare, to assist frail older people, and on how having telecare in place affected, and was influenced by, these arrangements. Based on detailed research with older telecare users and people involved in their care, the paper defines and contrasts three ‘ideal types’ identified as: ‘complex’; ‘family- based’; and ‘privatised support’ caring networks. It considers how telecare interacted with each type of caring network and explores differences in the relevance and applicability of each to frail older people in the AKTIVE study. Focusing on older people living at home with different types of frailty, the AKTIVE project aimed both to enhance understanding of how they (and those supporting them) accessed, engaged with and used the telecare equipment supplied to them, and to explore the consequences for them of doing so. In this paper particular reference is made to differences between older people using telecare who lived alone or with others; and between those who had memory problems or were susceptible to falls. The paper shows how telecare enhanced all three types of network, in at least some examples in the study, although no network type was dependent, or solely reliant, upon it. This highlights that telecare is not a panacea, a substitute for human care or an adequate solution in and of itself.

Coping with change: frail bodies and daily activities in later life: AKTIVE working paper 4

FRY Gary
2014

This paper explores responses to changes arising from bodily frailty observed among older people participating in the AKTIVE study and discussed with them during research visits. Focusing on older people living at home with different types of frailty, the AKTIVE project aimed both to enhance understanding of how they (and those supporting them) accessed, engaged with and used the telecare equipment supplied to them, and to explore the consequences for them of doing so. This paper identifies which daily activities were affected in older age and the strategies older people drew upon to cope. The paper also explores how telecare was combined with other support mechanisms to help older people maintain both practical and recreational daily activities. Throughout, there is discussion about limitations in how care support was sometimes provided, including how telecare was acquired and used by older people and/or those caring for or supporting them, and how far these problems might be overcome by more proactive implementation.

Assistive technology as a means of supporting people with dementia: a review

BONNER Steve, IDRIS Tahir
2012

Awareness of Assistive Technology (AT) products, devices and solutions available is still sketchy and variable around the UK. There is almost a ‘postcode lottery’ relating to the quality of AT solutions available to people with dementia due to the varying approaches taken around the country. This paper reviews the current policy and practice in relation to AT supporting people to live well with dementia, including different housing settings and rounding off with some good practice case studies which highlight the wide array of technology solutions available. Included in this review are: a brief summary of different types of AT; a review of policy initiatives, including legislation, which have attempted to encourage the greater use of AT; ethical considerations; current practice by major housing providers; good practice examples; and people with dementia’s experience.

Results 111 - 120 of 147

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