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Results for 'older people'

Results 141 - 147 of 147

Impact and economic assessment of assistive technology in care homes in Norfolk, UK

AL-ORAIBI Saleh, FORDHAM Ric, LAMBERT Rod
2012

This study looked at whether new assistive technology (AT) systems in care homes for elderly residents, reduced the number of falls and demands for formal health services. The project collected retrospective data about the incidence of falls before and after AT systems were installed in two care homes in Norfolk, UK. These homes were selected purposefully because a recent assessment identified the need for upgrading their call system. They had different resident profiles regarding the prevalence of dementia. Standard incident report forms were examined for a period starting ten months before the upgrades to ten months after in Care Home 1 and from six months before to six months afterwards in Care Home 2. Overall there were 314 falls reported during the course of the study; the number reduced from 202 to 112 after the introduction of AT. The mean health care costs associated with falls in Care Home 1 were significantly reduced (more than 50%). In Care Home 2 there was no significant difference in the mean cost. The results suggest that installing an AT system in residential care homes can reduce the number of falls and health care cost in homes with a lower proportion of residents with advanced dementia compared to those with more residents with advanced dementia.

AT and telecare to manage fire risks in the homes of older and vulnerable people

DOUGHTY Kevin, ORTON Mike
2014

Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to identify opportunities where technology interventions could help manage the risks associated with fire and explosions in homes of people who are older or who are vulnerable through other causes such as mental health problems or a history of substance abuse. Design/methodology/approach: The approach focused on reviewing the latest available statistics in order to identify the major causes and rooms in which fire accidents occurred. Findings: The authors found that the number of incidents and fatalities continues to decrease as a result of preventive measures such as a greater use of smoke detectors, but that there remained issues with cooking safety. New products for limiting damage and managing risks are available which could have a positive impact. Research limitations/implications: The paper concludes that the challenges are making both professionals and the public aware of the available technologies and of introducing them following appropriate assessment of needs and risks. Practical implications: Greater resources need to be offered for training of the public and of health and safety professionals. Further funding may be needed to implement the introduction of new technology. Originality/value: This is the most up-to-date review of fire control measures employing assistive technology and telecare for domestic properties and will be of value to community health teams, adults care organisations, housing associations and other public bodies.

The user voice: older people's experiences of reablement and rehabilitation

TRAPPES-LOMAX Tessa, HAWTON Annie
2012

Effective reablement is dependent on service users' co-operation and motivation. It therefore needs to be highly responsive to their needs and views. This study offers specific user views about their experiences in different settings and at different stages of reablement, together with their ideas for how it might work better. The study describes the experiences of 42 older people in rehabilitation services in community hospitals and local authority short-term residential units followed by “usual care” services at home. It is based on semi-structured face-to-face interviews in 2002/3, from East and Mid Devon, England. Findings revealed four main themes: the complexity of rehabilitative need; the influence of the setting; the role of the staff; and the availability of reablement support back at home. The authors concluded that the findings demonstrate changing rehabilitative needs along the care pathway, with implications for commissioners and providers of reablement services.

The effect of telecare on the quality of life and psychological well-being of elderly recipients of social care over a 12-month period: the Whole Systems Demonstrator cluster randomised trial

HIRANI Shashivadan Parbati, et al
2014

Background: Home-based telecare (TC) is utilised to manage risks of independent living and provide prompt emergency responses. This study examined the effect of TC on health-related quality of life (HRQoL), anxiety and depressive symptoms over 12 months in patients receiving social care. Design: A study of participant-reported outcomes [the Whole Systems Demonstrator (WSD) Telecare Questionnaire Study; baseline n = 1,189] was nested in a pragmatic cluster-randomised trial of TC (the WSD Telecare trial), held across three English Local Authorities. General practice (GP) was the unit of randomisation and TC was compared with usual care (UC). Methods: Participant-reported outcome measures were collected at baseline, short-term (4 months) and long-term (12 months) follow-up, assessing generic HRQoL, anxiety and depressive symptoms. Primary intention-to-treat analyses tested treatment effectiveness and were conducted using multilevel models to control for GP clustering and covariates for participants who completed questionnaire measures at baseline assessment plus at least one other assessment (n = 873). Results: Analyses found significant differences between TC and UC on Short Form-12 mental component scores (P < 0.05), with parameter estimates indicating being a member of the TC trial-arm increases mental component scores (UC-adjusted mean = 40.52; TC-adjusted mean = 43.69). Additional significant analyses revealed, time effects on EQ5D (decreasing over time) and depressive symptoms (increasing over time). Conclusions: TC potentially contributes to the amelioration in the decline in users’ mental HRQoL over a 12-month period. TC may not transform the lives of its users, but it may afford small relative benefits on some psychological and HRQOL outcomes relative to users who only receive UC.

Reducing social isolation and promoting well being in older people

HEMINGWAY Ann, JACK Eleanor
2013

A UK charity established a network of 70 friendship clubs in the south of England, facilitated by volunteers, with the aim of promoting well-being for older people. The charity provides venues and transport for participants to meet and enjoy activities locally every week for 2 hours. This article reports on a 3 year research project exploring the impacts of the intervention, using qualitative research methods and including participant observation and individual and focus group interviews. The study was based on 10 of the friendship clubs and collected information from 82 members and 18 volunteers. The article describes the intervention and the study methodology. It presents the results, with illustrative quotations from participants, covering views on the risk of becoming isolated, feeling isolated, and friendship and support. It identifies additional factors that can predispose an individual to become socially isolated, including environment and safety fears, fear of falling, and loss of confidence, and notes that even when living with their families older people can still feel socially isolated. It reports that club members and volunteers viewed themselves as assets for each other, offering support, advice and friendship, and that, overall, the perceived benefits for attendees of attending the friendship clubs fell into 3 key areas: improved well-being, social relations, and mental and physical health.

Early intervention and dementia care: innovation and impact

SEABROOKE Viniti, MILNE Alisoun
2014

Purpose: This study aims to systematically evaluate the impact and effectiveness of two early intervention services in NW Kent. Design/methodology/approach: Data were gathered via evaluation questionnaires for both projects; these included quantitative post-intervention data and qualitative comments. Data on referrals to secondary care and a specialist third sector organisation were also collected for the primary care project. Findings: Findings from the primary care project indicate that targeting a specific age cohort of patients can be effective in terms of: early identification of dementia-related concerns, the provision of support, appropriate referrals to secondary care, and increased referrals to a third sector dementia service. At the end of the project most practitioners felt they were better informed about dementia, more committed to facilitating early diagnosis, and had gained confidence in using a screening tool (the General Practitioner Assessment of Cognition Test). Evidence from evaluating the Carers Group suggests that attendance helped members manage emotional difficulties, increased understanding of dementia, and enhanced coping skills. They also felt less isolated and knew how to access support services. Practical implications: The projects offer two models of intervention: how a proactive third sector agency can work with primary care professionals to enhance commitment to dementia case finding and the provision of group support to relatives of those in receipt of a recent dementia diagnosis. Originality/value: The study provides insights into early intervention in dementia care how to evaluate impact of effectiveness.

Older people's prevention services: comparing perspectives of local authorities and the third sector

NATIONAL INSTITUTE FOR HEALTH RESEARCH. School for Social Care Research
2013

Third sector organisations (TSOs) have historically played a significant role in the delivery of adult social care. Often seen to be associated with qualities such as strong community links, access to disadvantaged groups and innovative practice, TSOs remain a popular choice with local authority commissioners as providers of preventative services. This study explored the views of nine locally commissioned TSOs and two national organisations which provide preventative services for older people. Senior managers were interviewed about their views of the purpose of such services, how the TSO understood their impacts, and their experience of being commissioned by the public sector. The results were added to previous research with local authorities to build a picture of the local authority and third sector relationship. The research identifies positive aspects within the current arrangements, but also gaps in respect of setting and understanding of outcomes and a reliance on personal relationships within the commissioning process.

Results 141 - 147 of 147

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