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Results for 'organisational culture'

Results 1 - 4 of 4

Developing a wellbeing and strengths-based approach to social work practice: changing culture

GOLLINS Tim, et al
2016

This report discusses the need to for social workers in adult social care to change their workforce culture to one that is 'strengths-based' for promoting well-being, early intervention and prevention. It examines the value of this approach in creating better outcomes for people living more actively in their local communities, generating greater satisfaction for people using services and their carers; and creating a motivated workforce. The report then sets out the key knowledge and skills the social care workforce needs to apply strengths-based approaches in improving people’s lives. It also considers the emerging business case for how a community-focused strengths-based approach can deliver efficiencies for the sector. Cases study examples from Shropshire, Essex County Council, Hertfordshire and Calderdale show how councils and their health partners are developing new ways of working to deliver an alternative health and social care operating model.

Building contingent capacity: shifting power in organisations to become more responsive to the people they serve

KAUR-STUBBS Sukhvinder
2015

This paper sets out research to understand and work within the emerging landscape in which organisations find that the people they serve acquire greater prominence among their multiple stakeholders and power gradients have to adjust accordingly. Respect for the dignity of people and how organisations respond to their needs, wishes, gifts and aspirations are becoming pivotal. Drawing on a survey and participation of 20 sector leaders at a roundtable hosted by the University of Birmingham and funded by the Barrow Cadbury Trust, the research proposes a framework for organisations to review and, if necessary, restate the priority given to people (commonly called users), develop practice that encourages reciprocity in the design and delivery of products and services, and establish processes that are pervious and accountable to people and their networks. At the core of the framework is the concept of contingent capacity. Contingent capacity is purposeful, distributive and empowers workers (staff and volunteers), to listen to and respect people and, inspire their participation. The approach comprises three stages, which include: Purpose and Power – against a backdrop of more assertive citizens and a changing socio-economic environment, reviewing how the organisation continues to respect the dignity of the people it serves and ensures they are able to contribute to decisions that affect them; Reciprocal Engagement – recalibrating practice and culture to give greater priority to people and encourage deep and iterative engagement; and Outcome Plus – ensuring processes optimise value, not just to the organisation but, also, to the people and the wider communities around them.

Assisted living technology and services: a learning development framework

SKILLS FOR CARE
2013

A learning and development framework to support those involved in the commissioning, design or delivery of workforce development. The framework aims to help ensure that the social care workforce has the skills and knowledge to use assisted living technology to enhance the lives of vulnerable people and their carers. Five stages provide the structure for the framework: Readiness; Customer Flow Analysis (guidance to assist the identification of work or service flow in your or your partner's organisation); Workforce Analysis (which provides guidance on how to map tasks and roles to knowledge and skills needed); Learning Design and Delivery (providing tools and resources for learning) and Checking (helping to evaluate the impact of learning). The framework also provides definitions, terminology and language that can be used by all when preparing workforce development products in the assistive living technology field.

Funny things happen at the Grange: introducing comedy activities in day services to older people with dementia: innovative practice

HAFFORD-LETCHFIELD Trish
2013

This paper shares outcomes from the evaluation of a community project where comedy activities were introduced into a day centre for older people with dementia as a result of a partnership between the day centre, a local university and a specialist comedy provider. Four workshops were provided using improvisatory activities and comedy, as a medium to engage older people in reflecting on aspects of their care environment. The main output resulted in a 30 minute ‘mockumentary’ of the ‘Her Majesty the Queen’ visiting the day centre, in the form of a digital reusable learning object to be used by social work and mental health professionals. The evaluation demonstrated some additional outcomes for those involved and highlighted the benefits of laughter and fun in promoting a positive climate.

Results 1 - 4 of 4

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