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Results for 'performance evaluation'

Results 1 - 10 of 23

Report of the annual social prescribing network conference

SOCIAL PRESCRIBING NETWORK
2016

Report of the annual social prescribing network conference, which sets out a definition of social prescribing, outlines principles for effective service provision and the steps needed to evaluate and measure the impact of social prescribing. It also includes an analysis of a pre-conference survey, completed by 78 participants to explore their experience of social prescribing. Key ingredients identified that underpin social prescribing included: funding, healthcare professional buy-in, simple referral process, link workers with appropriate training, patient centred care, provision of services, patient buy-in and benefits of social prescribing. The benefits of social prescribing fell into six broad headings: physical and emotional health and wellbeing; behaviour change; cost effectiveness and sustainability; capacity to build up the voluntary community; local resilience and cohesion; and tackling the social determinants of ill health. Afternoon sessions covered the following topics: obtaining economic data on social prescribing; engaging different stakeholders in social prescribing; standards and regulations that could be applied to social prescribing services; qualities and skills necessary to commission high quality social prescribing services; designing research studies on social prescribing. Short case studies are included. There was consensus from participants that social prescribing provides potential to reduce pressures on health and care services through referral to non-medical, and often community-based, sources of support.

Understanding local needs for wellbeing data measures and indicators

BROWN Helen, ADBALLAH Saamah, TOWNSELY Ruth
2017

This report presents a new Local Wellbeing Indicator set for local authorities, public health leaders and Health and Wellbeing boards to help local decision-makers better understand the wellbeing of their local populations, and how they can act to improve it. The set is the product of a six-month scoping project co-commissioned by the Office for National Statistics (ON) and Public Health England (PHE), in collaboration with the What Works Centre for Wellbeing and Happy City. The report outlines the rationale for the selection of indicators, details the methodology used, and presents the indicators. The final framework consists of an ‘ideal’ set and a ‘currently available’ set of Local Wellbeing indicators, recognising that some of the indicators proposed in the ideal set are not yet available at the local authority level. The ‘ideal’ set is based on a core of 26 indicators of individual wellbeing and its determinants. The ‘currently available’ set contains 23 indicators. Both the ‘ideal’ and ‘currently available’ sets are built around seven domains: personal wellbeing, economy, education and childhood, equality, health, place and social relationships. The report also includes recommendations for additional ‘deeper dive’ support indicators that provide more detailed insight in specific areas and contexts. The indicators aim to meet the need for a practical local translation of the Measuring National Wellbeing programme Office, introduced by the Office for National Statistics (ONS) in 2011.

Policy briefing: music, singing and wellbeing in adults with diagnosed conditions or dementia

WHAT WORKS WELLBEING
2016

Drawing on the available evidence, this briefing examines what music and singing interventions work to improve wellbeing of adults living with diagnosed conditions or dementia. While there is ample evidence looking at the impact of music and singing on clinical outcomes such as pain management, coping with hospitalisation, coping with symptoms and managing symptoms of dementia, this new evidence focuses on wellbeing for those living with diagnosed conditions or dementia. Specifically, it focuses on self-reported measures of quality of life; life satisfaction; and anxiety or depression. The paper suggests that there is strong evidence that brief music therapy is an effective intervention to support wellbeing of palliative care patients in hospital settings and initial evidence that music therapy can contribute to improved spiritual wellbeing in hospice patients. There is strong evidence targeted, culturally relevant music interventions can decrease depression in nursing students in a college environment and initial evidence that music therapy can alleviate anxiety in undergraduate students. There is promising evidence that targeted, culturally relevant music and singing interventions can enhance mental wellbeing and decrease depression in older people with chronic conditions in residential and community settings and initial evidence that participation in individual personalised music listening sessions can reduce anxiety and/or depression in nursing home residents with dementia and that listening to music may enhance overall wellbeing for adults with dementia. There is initial evidence that participation in extended community singing programmes can improve quality of life and social and emotional wellbeing in adults living with chronic conditions.

Systematic review: music, singing and wellbeing for adults living with diagnosed conditions

DAYKIN Norma, et al
2016

A systematic review of wellbeing outcomes of music and singing for adults, encompassing data from 1364 participants with identified health conditions such as stroke, COPD and mental health conditions. The review does not include clinical studies of music and singing, including interventions for patients in hospital, where the focus is on clinical outcomes such as pain management or coping with symptoms or hospitalisation. The evidence points to wellbeing outcomes including reduced depression and anxiety in people of all ages. In relation to adults with adults with chronic conditions such as stroke, COPD and cancer, the studies report reduced stress and improved wellbeing across a range of outcomes. Specifically, the review finds that there is high quality evidence that: targeted, culturally relevant music interventions can decrease depression in nursing students in a college environment; brief music therapy is an effective intervention to support wellbeing of palliative care patients in hospital settings. There is moderate quality evidence that: targeted, culturally relevant music interventions, including playing a musical instrument and singing, can decrease depression in older people with chronic conditions in residential and community settings; participants report a wide range of wellbeing benefits from singing including relaxation, distraction, reduction in anxiety, spiritual uplifting and improvements in mood, emotional wellbeing, confidence, enjoyment and a ‘feel good factor’; participation in a music project can raise participants’ awareness of the significance of music in their life. This in turn can have a positive effect on awareness of health and quality of life and can encourage behaviour change.

Systematic review: music, singing and wellbeing for adults living with dementia

VICTOR Christina, et al
2016

A systematic review of the subjective, self-reported wellbeing outcomes of music and singing in adults living with dementia. The review encompasses data from 249 participants in quantitative and qualitative studies from Australia, Canada, Finland, France, and the United Kingdom. It encompasses interventions focusing upon singing or listening to music. Three key domains of wellbeing are reported: quality of life, depression and anxiety. Studies and findings where the methodology entails observation by a researcher or clinician of the effects of music and singing on the wellbeing of people with dementia were excluded. In addition, the review excluded studies where the outcome was defined in terms of dementia or clinical symptoms or where the focus was on outcomes for carers. Given these caveats the key findings are that for people with dementia music and signing are important aspects of subjective wellbeing that can promote domains of subjective wellbeing, social connections and maintenance of identity. Active participation seemed to be less beneficial than listening to music but this is only a very tentative finding which needs support by further research. On the current evidence base, the review supports the development of policy and practice of support for music and singing interventions for wellbeing outcomes for people with dementia but suggests that interventions should reflect both active and passive forms of engagement.

Warm, safe and well: the evaluation of the Warm at Home programme

BENNETT Ellen, et al
2016

This report presents the findings from an evaluation of the Foundations Independent Living Trust Ltd (FILT) SSE Warm at Home (WAH) Programme. The programme, whose funding came via a financial penalty (or redress payment) imposed by the energy regulator Ofgem on the energy company SSE, provided funds to enable the homes of vulnerable householders to become more energy efficient and/or easier to keep warm, addressing the negative impact that fuel poverty and cold homes have on the physical and mental health of both adults and children. Funds were channelled through HIAs operating across England. The funding enabled HIAs to provide energy efficiency advice and warm homes-related practical interventions to their clients (new and existing), typically older homeowners with a long-term illness or disability and/or on a low income. The report indicates that improvements in health and wellbeing were reported once work had been completed. The greatest health and wellbeing improvements were experienced by those who received heating installation or replacement, and for those whom the highest cost work (£1,000 or more) was undertaken. Overall the WAH Programme appears to be a cost-effective intervention from a health perspective but there are variations in relation to the type and cost of intervention. The Programme is estimated to have led to an additional 121.8 QALYs. If the assumed total QALY gained across the whole Programme is converted into a monetary value using the NHS threshold of £20,000, then the value of the benefits gained amounts to £2,436,000. For every £1 of the £637,000 funding distributed to vulnerable households, the WAH Programme produced almost £4 of benefits in terms of better health.

Social isolation in mental health: a conceptual and methodological review: scoping review 14

WANG Jingyi, et al
2016

Social isolation and related terms such as loneliness have been increasingly discussed in the field of mental health. However, there is a lack of conceptual clarity and consistency of measurement of these terms and understanding of overlaps. This report provides definitions and brief explanations of relevant conceptual terms from the literature, and proposed a conceptual model covering different aspects of social isolation. Aspects of social isolation covered include loneliness, social support, social network, social capital, confiding relationships, and alienation. The conceptual model contains five domains to include all elements of current conceptualisations. These five domains are: social network: quantity; social network: structure; social network: quality; appraisal of relationships: emotional; appraisal of relationships: resources. It then proposes well established measures in the field of mental health for each conceptual domains of social isolation. The authors discuss the strengths and limitations of the approach. The developed model can help researchers and intervention developers to identify expected outcomes of interventions precisely and choose the most appropriate measures for use in mental health settings.

The power of peer support: what we have learned from the Centre for Social Action Innovation Fund

GRAHAM Jullie Tran, RUTHERFORD Katy
2016

This report looks at the value of peer support and the part it can play in a people-powered health system. It also shares practical insights from 10 organisations involved in Nesta’s Centre for Social Action Innovation Fund on how peer support can be effectively scaled and spread to benefit more people. The ten case studies provide details of the peer support innovations and evidence of their impact to date. The peer support models developed included one-to-one peer support, group peer support and digital approaches. From the ten peer support innovations, the report highlights key learning about the realities of delivering peer support across a range of conditions and with very different groups of people. These covers engaging people in peer support; recruiting, training and supporting peer facilitators; and evaluating and improving peer support. The report finds that peer support has the potential to improve psychosocial outcomes, behaviour, wellbeing outcomes, and service use. It also found that reciprocity was an important motivator for volunteers and that the most effective volunteers were trained and well supported. It concludes with what the future might hold for those working with and commissioning peer support in England. Recommendations include developing relationships with public service professionals to help them understand the value of peer support and embedding peer support alongside existing services.

Harnessing social action to support older people: evaluating the Reducing Winter Pressures Fund

GEORGHIOU Theo, et al
2016

Presents the findings of an evaluation of seven social action projects funded by the Cabinet Office, NHS England, Monitor, NHS Trust Development Authority and the Association of Directors of Adult Social Services. The aim of the Reducing Winter Pressures Fund was to scale up and test projects that used volunteers to support older people to stay well, manage health conditions or recover after illness, and thereby reduce pressure on hospitals. The organisations supported by the fund comprised a range of national and local charities. These projects fell into three broad categories: community-based support, supporting discharge from hospital wards, and supporting individuals in A&E department to avoid admissions. Between them, the projects offered a wide range of services to older people – both direct (for example help with shopping or providing transport) and indirect (linking with other services). The evaluation resulted in a mixed set of findings. From the interviews with staff, volunteers and local stakeholders, there was evidence of services that had made an impact by providing practical help, reassurance and connection with other services that could reduce isolation and enable independence. Those involved with the projects felt that volunteers and project staff could offer more time to users than pressurised statutory sector staff, which enabled a fuller understanding of a person’s needs while also freeing up staff time. However, the analysis of hospital activity data in the months that followed people's referral into the projects did not suggest that these schemes impacted on the use of NHS services in the way that was assumed, with no evidence of a reduction in emergency hospital admissions, or in costs of hospital care following referral to the social action projects. The one exception was the project based in an A&E department, which revealed a smaller number of admissions in the short term. The report questions whether these sorts of interventions can ever be fully captured solely using hospital-based data and conceptualising reduced or shortened admissions as a key marker of success.

Community navigation in Brighton and Hove: evaluation of a social prescribing pilot

FARENDEN Clair, et al
2015

An evaluation of the community navigation service, a one-year social prescribing pilot. The model for the pilot was based on Age UK national templates, drawing from their vast knowledge and experience of delivering other similar services across the UK. Community navigators work in GP surgeries to assess patients non-medical support needs and help them access groups, services and activities that can broadly improve their health and wellbeing. The evaluation found that navigation is effective for patients, GP surgeries and volunteers. Patients feel listened to and understood by navigators, have increased access to the right services at the right time and are able to take the next steps towards improving their health and wellbeing. GPs continue to increase referrals, are satisfied with the quality of the service and are seeing positive benefits for their patients. Navigators value their volunteering role and suggest the training and support provided by the staff team enables them to carry it out effectively. 393 patients were referred across 16 surgeries during the first 12 months of the pilot and 741 referrals were made to groups, services and activities patients would not have otherwise accessed. The service attracted a highly experienced and skilled volunteer team to carry out the community navigator role. Most navigators have a previous or current career in healthcare, social services, teaching or counselling. The evaluation examines in detail: the impact on primary and secondary care; community navigation activities, outputs and outcomes; the social value; cost-benefit analysis; lessons, challenges and successes; and risk and opportunities. A set of key recommendations derived from the learning from the pilot are included.

Results 1 - 10 of 23

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