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Results for 'person-centred care'

Results 1 - 10 of 44

Haven: sharing receptive music listening to foster connections and wellbeing for people with dementia who are nearing the end of life, and those who care for them

GARABEDIAN Claire, KELLY Fiona
2020

This paper reports on research exploring the effects of music played for 12 dyads: a care home resident (‘resident’) with dementia and someone closely connected to him/her (‘carer’). Six individualised music interventions (3 live and 3 pre-recorded) were played by the first author on solo cello within five Scottish non-NHS care homes. All interventions were video-recorded. Semi-structured interviews with carer participants, key staff, and managers explored their responses to interventions. Thick descriptions of video recordings and interview transcripts were thematically coded using Nvivo. A key finding was that structural elements of the interventions combined with characteristics of the music played facilitated an internalised experience of ‘haven’; sonically transporting listeners away from their present reality and fulfilling the basic human needs for inclusion, comfort, identity, occupation and attachment.

Reducing emergency hospital admissions: a population health complex intervention of an enhanced model of primary care and compassionate communities

ABEL Julian, et al
2018

Background: Reducing emergency admissions to hospital has been a cornerstone of healthcare policy. Little evidence exists to show that systematic interventions across a population have achieved this aim. The authors report the impact of a complex intervention over a 44-month period in Frome, Somerset, on unplanned admissions to hospital. Aim: To evaluate a population health complex intervention of an enhanced model of primary care and compassionate communities on population health improvement and reduction of emergency admissions to hospital. Design and setting: A cohort retrospective study of a complex intervention on all emergency admissions in Frome Medical Practice, Somerset, compared with the remainder of Somerset, from April 2013 to December 2017. Method: Patients were identified using broad criteria, including anyone giving cause for concern. Patient-centred goal setting and care planning combined with a compassionate community social approach was implemented broadly across the population of Frome. Results: There was a progressive reduction, by 7.9 cases per quarter (95% confidence interval [CI] = 2.8 to 13.1, P = 0.006), in unplanned hospital admissions across the whole population of Frome during the study period from April 2013 to December 2017, a decrease of 14.0%. At the same time, there was a 28.5% increase in admissions per quarter within Somerset, with a rise in the number of unplanned admissions of 236 per quarter (95% CI = 152 to 320, P<0.001). Conclusion The complex intervention in Frome was associated with highly significant reductions in unplanned admissions to hospital, with a decrease in healthcare costs across the whole population of Frome.

The role and principles of reablement

SOCIAL CARE INSTITUTE FOR EXCELLENCE
2020

This briefing provides an overview of the role and principles of reablement in the social care sector. It describes the different models used to deliver reablement, illustrating the shift from traditional home care towards personalised, outcome-focused care. Reablement is a strengths-based, person-centred approach that promotes and maximises independence and wellbeing. The briefing also outlines elements of effective reablement, which include assessment and goal setting, and managing risk and choice. It is designed for those working in reablement or commissioning it, but may also be useful to carers and people receiving reablement.

The effect of music on wellbeing - case studies

CONROY Jill, FAULKNER Sue
2020

This article reports on a small scale study of the impact of personalised music on residents living with dementia in a care home. Three care homes (Fremantle Trust's Lent Rise House, Lewin House and Meadowside care homes) and nine people living with dementia took part in the two week study. Care staff and activity organisers selected times of day (and night) to play music or a radio station with the resident. The researchers collaborated with Unforgettable (now part of Live Better with Dementia), a company allied to the non-profit organisation Music and Memory which donates iPods to people living in care homes to deliver the intervention. Findings:Qualitative statements from the care homes were invariably positive. Personalised music was found to reduce agitation and improve mood. None of the people living with dementia were able to initiate music themselves, so it required either staff or visitors to play it. Conclusion: the findings suggest that, when compiled in a person-centred way, music can be a source of comfort and calm. It can counter distressing events, alleviate anxiety, and increase sociability. The paper also includes some implications for practice or tips on how to provide personalised music in care homes.

Facilitators and barriers to autonomy: a systematic literature review for older adults with physical impairments, living in residential care facilities

van LOON Jolande, et al
2019

Autonomy is important in every stage of life. However, little is known about how autonomy is enhanced for older adults living in residential care facilities (RCFs). This leads to the research question: which facilitators and barriers to autonomy of older adults with physical impairments due to ageing and chronic health conditions living in RCFs are known? The results will be organised according to the framework of person-centred practice, because this is related to autonomy enhancement. To answer the research question, a systematic literature search and review was performed in the electronic databases CINAHL, PsycINFO, PubMed, Social Services Abstracts and Sociological Abstracts. Inclusion and exclusion criteria were derived from the research question. Selected articles were analysed and assessed on quality using the Mixed Methods Appraisal Tool. Facilitators and barriers for autonomy were found and arranged in four themes: characteristics of residents, prerequisites of professional care-givers, care processes between resident and care-giver, and environment of care. The established facilitators and barriers are relational and dynamic. For a better understanding of the facilitators and barriers to autonomy for older adults with physical impairments living in RCFs, a description is based on the 35 included articles. Autonomy is a capacity to influence the environment and make decisions irrespective of having executional autonomy, to live the kind of life someone desires to live in the face of diminishing social, physical and/or cognitive resources and dependency, and it develops in relationships. The results provide an actual overview and lead to a better understanding of barriers and facilitators for the autonomy of older adults with physical impairments in RCFs. For both residents and care-givers, results offer possibilities to sustain and reinforce autonomy. Scientifically, the study creates new knowledge on factors that influence autonomy, which can be used to enhance autonomy.

Innovations in community-centred support

THINK LOCAL ACT PERSONAL
2019

An online directory which provides examples of innovative and community-centred models of support that improve people's wellbeing. The directory will help commissioners and providers to find out about community-centred approaches that are having a positive impact on people's lives. It covers examples in the following areas: helping people stay well and connected with others; supporting people to contribute; supporting people to live well at home; new models of care and support with accommodation; and regaining independence. The examples are all person-centred, work with people’s strengths; and are about supporting people to have a life and not a service.

Connecting communities and healthcare: making social prescribing work for everyone

DAVISON Ewan
2019

This paper provides insights and examples from the community and voluntary sector on how social prescribing can improve people's health and wellbeing. It highlights key learning for social prescribing practice, which includes: the need to establish good relationships with GPs and other referrers, recruiting Link workers with a blend of experience and knowledge, and looking after their wellbeing; and providing activities that people want and services that meet their needs. The paper also examines some of the wider system challenges and offer examples of solutions our grant holders are developing and testing. It will be useful for those who are thinking of designing new social prescribing schemes or expanding or improving existing ones.

Review of integrated care: focus on falls

HEALTHCARE INSPECTORATE WALES
2019

Based on a review of integrated care for older people who are at risk of experiencing a fall in Wales, this report highlights learning for staff and for health and social care managers. It focuses on services to help people avoid a fall and how to support people who have had a fall, providing examples of desirable and undesirable pathways through the health and care system. It focuses on the three areas: prevention of falls and promotion of independence, for people living in their own home or in a care home; response to falls when they happen in the community, either for someone living at home or in a care home; and following attendance at hospital due to a fall. It also highlights key themes identified from the review and how the affected service users, service providers and commissioners. The review identified examples of good practice but also found a lack of co-ordination and communication between health, social care and voluntary services could often be a barrier to delivering good quality care. The report has been informed by evidence from six individual falls services, the views of staff and older people. It makes eight recommendations for the Welsh Government, health boards and local authorities. The include a National Falls Framework for Wales, to standardise the approach to preventing, treating and reabling older people who are at risk of falling or have already fallen The report will be relevant for service providers, commissioners and service users.

Testing the implementation of the Veder contact method: a theatre-based communication method in dementia care

BOERSMA Petra, et al
2019

Background and Objectives: There is a lack of research on implementation of person-centered care in nursing home care. The purpose of this study was to assess the implementation of the Veder contact method (VCM), a new person-centered method using theatrical, poetic and musical communication for application in 24-hr care. Research Design and Methods: Caregivers (n = 136) and residents (n = 141) participated in a 1-year quasi-experimental study. Foundation Theater Veder implemented VCM on six experimental wards and rated implementation quality. Six control wards delivered care-as-usual. Before and after implementation, caregiver behavior was assessed during observations using the Veder-observation list and Quality of Caregivers’ Behavior-list. Caregiver attitude was rated with the Approaches to Dementia Questionnaire. Quality of life, behavior, and mood of the residents were measured with QUALIDEM, INTERACT and FACE. Residents’ care plans were examined for person-centered background information. Results: Significant improvements in caregivers’ communicative behavior (i.e., the ability to apply VCM, establishing positive interactions) and some aspects of residents’ behavior and quality of life (i.e., positive affect, social relations) were found on the experimental wards with a high implementation score, as compared to the experimental wards with a low implementation score, and the control wards. No significant differences were found between the groups in caregivers’ attitudes, residents’ care plans, or mood. Discussion and Implications: The positive changes in caregivers’ behavior and residents’ well-being on the high implementation score wards confirm the partly successful VCM implementation. Distinguishing between wards with a high and low implementation score provided insight into factors which are crucial for successful implementation.

Going the extra step: a compendium of best practice in dementia care. Preventing unwanted isolation and loneliness for people with dementia living in housing with care

TWYFORD Katey, WELLS Wendy
2019

A collection of examples of extra care schemes and other housing related community services that support people with dementia to develop meaningful relationships, helping to reduce social isolation and loneliness. They include examples of personalised support that can be arranged for residents; examples of groups and social activities; and different organisational and community-based approaches that have been adopted. The examples range from informal arrangements supported by staff or other residents to formal service provision.

Results 1 - 10 of 44

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News

Moving Memory

Moving Memory Practice example about how the Moving Memory Dance Theatre Company is challenging perceived notions of age and ageing.

Chatty Cafe Scheme

Chatty Cafe Scheme Practice example about how the Chatty Cafe Scheme is helping to tackle loneliness by bringing people of all ages together

Oomph! Wellness

Oomph! Wellness Practice example about how Oomph! Wellness is supporting staff to get older adults active and combat growing levels of social isolation

KOMP

KOMP Practice example about how KOMP, designed by No Isolation is helping older people stay connected with their families

LAUGH research project

LAUGH research project Practice example about a research project to develop highly personalised, playful objects for people with advanced dementia
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