#EXCLUDE#
#EXCLUDE#
#EXCLUDE#
#EXCLUDE#

Find prevention records by subject or service provider/commissioner name

  • Key to icons

    • Journal Prevention service example
    • Book Book
    • Digital media Digital media
    • Journal Journal article
    • Free resource Free resource

Results for 'person-centred care'

Results 1 - 10 of 23

Asset-based commissioning: better outcomes, better value

FIELD Richard, MILLER Clive
2017

This publication provides an overview of asset-based practice and looks at the development of asset-aware and asset-based commissioning. It makes the case for adopting asset-based commissioning to improve outcomes for individuals and the community and outlines the implications for stakeholders, systems, behaviours and relationships of making this change. Asset-based commissioning is an approach which enables people and communities to become equal co-commissioners and co-producers and make the best use of all assets. The publication includes many examples of past and current innovations and looks at how they could be further developed and implemented at scale to achieve improved, economic, environmental and social outcomes. Key sections: look at the development of asset-based practice, its key principles and the role played by user-led organisations, personalisation, co-production and self-help ; examine how commissioning has evolved over the last three decades and how the current model is moving towards asset-based commissioning; and describe the paradigm shift involved in moving from conventional to asset-based commissioning and synthesises a wide range of asset-based commissioning practices into a unified model. The final section provides a guide to where and how to get started in developing asset-based commissioning and explores how to do this at scale.

Person-centred approaches: empowering people to live their lives and communities to enable to upgrade in prevention, wellbeing, health, care and support

SKILLS FOR HEALTH, SKILLS FOR CARE
2017

This education and training framework, commissioned by Health Education England, sets out core skills to support health and social care workforce to deliver person-centred approaches. It will help to staff communicate meaningfully, ensure they tailor the care and advice they give to suit peoples’ needs. It is applicable across services, sectors and across different types of organisations. The framework begins by describing the values, communication and relationship building skills that everyone delivering services should have to ensure consistent person-centred approaches. It arranges these into three ‘steps’: conversations to engage with people; conversations to enable and support people; and conversations with people to collaboratively manage highest complexity and significant risk. Within each step, the framework outlines behaviours which aim to illustrate what people and their carers would see in practice; learning outcomes; and short practice examples. Where appropriate, the framework encourages shared decision making and ensuring that all information is personalised, accessible and useful. The framework includes tips for delivering training and enablers for embedding a person-centred approach in organisations. The framework has been developed with the participation of health and social care experts and people who are experts by experience.

Flipping the narrative: essays on transformation from the sector's boldest voices

NEW PHILANTHROPY CAPITAL
2017

A compilation of 16 essays from innovative leaders in the charitable sector on how they are thinking about, and putting into action, new ways of achieving social change for the causes and beneficiaries their organisations. It includes contributions from leaders in national charities and smaller innovative organisations based in communities. The essays cover four key themes: strategy and governance – how organisational and governance change can support charities to deliver greater impact; the sector’s relationship with the public – the importance of trust and how charities can develop trust with the public; the sector’s relationship with the state –how to reframe interactions with the state and methods for forming more productive relationships, building on the strengths of the voluntary sector and their ability to understand the challenges of those accessing public services; and new networks and resources – building collaborations with new partners from different sectors and maximising the potential of new resources, such as digital technology and the voices and strengths of the communities they exist to serve.

Living, not existing: putting prevention at the heart of care for older people in Wales

ROYAL COLLEGE OF OCCUPATIONAL THERAPISTS
2017

This report focuses on the important contribution that occupational therapists can make to support further integration of health and social care in Wales. It looks at the role of occupational therapy in helping older people to remain independent and live in their own communities for as long as possible, preventing or delaying the need for expensive care long-term. The report focuses on three key areas: prevention or delaying the need for care and support; helping older people to remain in their communities; and ensuring equality of access to occupational therapy. It provides recommendations to improve the design and delivery of services and examples of best practice and individual case studies to how occupational therapists can contribution to integrated, person-centred services. These include for occupational therapists to work more closely with general practitioners, take on leadership roles to provide expertise to community providers on the development of person and community centred services; and the development of formal partnership agreements across local housing, health and social care sectors to ensure all older people have access to occupational therapy services.

Health, care and housing workshop

CENTRE FOR AGEING BETTER, ANCHOR, HANOVER
2017

Summarises discussions from workshop with people across the health, care and housing sectors to develop joint solutions to enable people to live independently for longer and alleviate pressure on the NHS and social care. The workshops aimed to identify the blockages preventing integration between health, care and housing; solutions to transform the system; and the implications for housing supply, commissioning decisions and care pathways. The three fictional personas were used to explore the experiences of individuals through the current health, care and housing system, and to identify what this might look like in an ideal world. Seven main themes emerged from the discussions: learning from good practice, focussing on the individual and their outcomes, rather than systems and cost savings; leadership from Government in relation to older people and older people’s housing; differences between housing and health that can create barriers to joint working; a more active role for local government and local citizens; the need to monitor the impact of early intervention and prevention; and improvements in current and new housing stock. A list of key actions and links to examples of good practice are included.

Making progress on personal and joined up support: report of a roundtable discussion. Implementing the NICE guideline on older people with social care needs and multiple long-term conditions (NG22)

NATIONAL INSTITUTE FOR HEALTH AND CARE EXCELLENCE
2016

This report summarises discussions from a roundtable event attended by older people and carer representatives, practitioners, providers and commissioners to identify how the NICE guideline on supporting older people with multiple long-term conditions and their carers could best be used and implemented. It also sets out practical examples, actions and ideas to help improve local practice. Small groups discussed how the guideline can help achieve three priorities that the Guideline Committee identified as most important for potential impact and the likely significant challenges. These were: empowering older people and carers; empowering health and social care practitioners; and integration of different care and support options to enable person-centred care. Suggested actions and practice examples in each of the three priority areas.

Stepping up to the place: the key to successful health and care integration

NHS CONFEDERATION, et al
2016

Joint publication from the Association of Directors of Adult Social Services, Local Government Association, NHS Clinical Commissioners and NHS Confederation which describes what a fully integrated, transformed system of health and social care should look like. Sections look at what can be achieved through integration for individuals, communities, local health wellbeing systems, and Government and national bodies; what is needed to make integration happen; what has been learnt about successful integration so far; and the issues that local and national leaders need to tackle. Drawing on a selection of evidence, reports, case studies and local experience, the document highlights three key components for effective integration. These are: shared commitments – to improving local people’s health and wellbeing, providing services around the individual, and a preventative approach; shared leadership and accountability; and shared systems – such as information and technology, payment and commissioning models, and integrated workforce planning. The final sections outline questions for local and national leaders and summarise the key components for effective integration of health and social care.

Making the change: behavioural factors in person- and community-centred approaches for health and wellbeing

BURD Hannah, HALLSWORTH Michael
2016

This report explores the behavioural science theories that suggest new ways of enabling people and communities to take a more active role in managing their own health and provides an accessible introduction to the theories of change. The report is structured around the three areas of capability, opportunity and motivation which researchers have identified as needing to be present for behaviour to occur. It highlights that a multi-faceted approach is needed to enable effective self-care. It identifies five enabling factors that that can influence engagement and self-management behaviours: a growth mindset where people view capabilities as something that can be developed, removing ‘friction costs’, social networks, motivation and goal setting. It also suggests how these factors can be targeted in order to encourage these behaviours. Examples and case studies illustrate the application of the theories. The report is aimed at policymakers, commissioners, service designers and organisations working to promote more person- and community-centred approaches for health and wellbeing.

At the heart of health: realising the value of people and communities

WOOD Suzanne, et al
2016

This report explores the value of people and communities at the heart of health, in support of the NHS Five Year Forward View vision to develop a new relationship with people and communities. It seeks to bring together in one place a wide range of person- and community-centred approaches for health and wellbeing. It provides an overview of the existing evidence base with a particular focus on the potential benefits of adopting these approaches. The report suggests that there is evidence from research and practice to demonstrate the benefits of person- and community-centred approaches, across three dimensions of value: mental and physical health and wellbeing – these approaches have been shown to increase people’s self-efficacy and confidence to manage their health and care, improve health outcomes and experience, to reduce social isolation and loneliness, and build community capacity and resilience, among other outcomes; NHS sustainability – these approaches can impact how people use health and care services and can lead to reduced demand on services, particularly emergency admissions and A&E visits; and wider social outcomes: these approaches can lead to a wide range of social outcomes, from improving employment prospects and school attendance to increasing volunteering. They also can potentially contribute to reducing health inequalities for individuals and communities. The report includes an outline of the ‘Realising the Value’ programme, which is designed to develop the field of person- and community-centred approaches for health and wellbeing by building the evidence base and developing tools, resources and networks to support the spread and increase the impact of key approaches.

Growing old together: sharing new ways to support older people

COMMISSION ON IMPROVING URGENT CARE FOR OLDER PEOPLE
2016

Final report from the Commission on Improving Urgent Care for Older People which provides guidance for those involved in designing care for older people and outlines eight key principles the health and care sector can adopt to improve urgent care for older people. The Commission was established out of a concern that the care system was not meeting the needs of older people, resulting in lower quality of care, a lack of out-of-hospital services as an alternative to A&E, not enough focus on prevention and early intervention, and delayed transfers of care. It brought together a range of experts, received over 60 evidence submissions; carried out visits to sites using innovative ways to deliver care; consulted with NHS Confederation members and patient and carer groups; and commissioned an evidence review. The report draws on the evidence to look at the case for change. It then outlines eight key principles that can be used when redesigning health and social care system: start with care driven by the person’s needs and personal goals; a greater focus on proactive care; acknowledge current strains on the system and allow time to think; the importance of care co-ordination and navigation; greater use of multi-disciplinary and multi-agency teams; ensure workforce, training and core skills reflect modern day requirements; leadership should encourage us to do things differently; and metrics must truly reflect the care experience for older people. Short case studies of innovative practice are included in the report, covering acute and primary care, voluntary sector and local government partners and commissioners.

Results 1 - 10 of 23

#EXCLUDE#
Ask about support on integration, STPs and transformation
ENQUIRE
Related SCIE content
Related NICE content
Related external content
Visit Social Care Online, the UK’s largest database of information and research on all aspects of social care and social work.
SEARCH NOW
Submit prevention service example
SUBMIT
What do you think about SCIE's work?
FEEDBACK
#EXCLUDE#
#EXCLUDE#
#EXCLUDE#