#EXCLUDE#
#EXCLUDE#
#EXCLUDE#
#EXCLUDE#

Find prevention records by subject or service provider/commissioner name

  • Key to icons

    • Journal Prevention service example
    • Book Book
    • Digital media Digital media
    • Journal Journal article
    • Free resource Free resource

Results for 'person-centred care'

Results 1 - 10 of 30

Community Webs: final evaluation report

BROWN C., et al
2018

Evaluation of Community Webs, a pilot project funded by Bristol Ageing Better (BAB) and Better Care Bristol (BCB), a social prescribing service which enables GP patients to access social activities and non-medical support services available in their local community. The evaluation of used both qualitative and quantitative methods to understand the process of delivery, short-term outcomes for clients and key costs linked to the project. The evaluation findings include client profiles and patterns of service use, patient experience of the linkworker service, GP and practice staff perceptions of the service, and links between service participation and client outcomes. The main reasons for practitioners making referrals were social isolation, low confidence and self-esteem and practical support needs (including welfare benefits, housing and form filling). The results suggest that Community Webs is beneficial for patients and GPs, in particular through its person-centred methods which have resulted in significant improvements to patients’ health and wellbeing. Patients have been provided with the right information to help them to access social, emotional and practical support, and have been able to make positive choices regarding their broader health and wellbeing needs. GP’s and practice staff have demonstrated trust in the voluntary and community sector, and in social prescribing in particular, by continuing to refer their patients into the service. The report also highlights that there is no ‘one size fits all’ in relation to social prescribing services and the value of exploring both the individual and community ‘assets’. Learning and recommendations are included.

Effect of horticultural therapy on wellbeing among dementia day care programme participants: a mixed-methods study

HALL Jodi, et al
2018

Fourteen people attending an adult day programme were recruited to a structured horticultural therapy programme which took place over 10 weeks. The effects were assessed using Dementia Care Mapping and questionnaires completed by family carers. High levels of wellbeing were observed while the participants were engaged in horticultural therapy, and these were sustained once the programme was completed. This study adds to the growing evidence on the benefits of horticultural therapy for people with dementia who have enjoyed gardening in the past.

Preventive interventions for the second half of life: a systematic review

HAJAT Cother, et al
2018

Objective: Recent improvements in life expectancy globally require intensified focus on noncommunicable diseases and age-related conditions. The purpose of this article is to inform the development of age-specific prevention guidelines for adults aged 50 and above, which are currently lacking. Data Source: PubMed, Cochrane database, and Google Scholar and explicit outreach to experts in the field. Study Inclusion and Exclusion Criteria: Meta-analyses, intervention-based, and prospective cohort studies that reported all-cause mortality, disease-specific mortality, or morbidity in adults were included. Data Extraction: A systematic review was undertaken in 2015 using search terms of a combination of and “intervention,” “mortality,” “reduction,” “improvement,” “death,” and “morbidity.” Data Synthesis: Interventions were categorized according to the Center for Evidence-Based Medicine Level of Evidence framework. Results: A summary table reports for each intervention the impact, strength of evidence, initiation, duration, and details of the intervention. Age-decade-specific preventive recommendations have been proposed relating to physical activity, diet, tobacco and alcohol use, medication adherence, screening and vaccination, and mental and cognitive health. Conclusion: Clear recommendations have been made according to the existing evidence base, but further research investment is needed to fill the many gaps. Further, personalized approaches to healthy aging complemented by population-wide approaches and broader cross-sector partnerships will help to ensure greater longevity is an opportunity, rather than a burden, for society.

Innovative models of health, care and support for adults

SOCIAL CARE INSTITUTE FOR EXCELLENCE
2018

This briefing explains that innovative, often small-scale models of health, social care and support for adults could be scaled up to benefit as many people as possible. The challenge is to make scaling up successful. The briefing is based on research conducted during the spring of 2017 by Nesta, SCIE, Shared Lives Plus and PPL. It includes real life examples and case studies to show how stakeholders are involved in building and growing successful and sustainable innovations in health, care and support which provide new ways of delivering relationship-based care. It also identifies key challenges and facilitators to scaling up innovative models and makes recommendations to help make impactful innovative models become part of mainstream care. It includes case studies from North London Carers – a community network of young professionals and older neighbours which helps to reduce loneliness and increase wellbeing; Age UK’s Personalised Integrated Care programme – which brings together voluntary organisations and health and care services to support for older people living with multiple long-term conditions who are at risk of recurring hospital admission; Shared lives - adults either live with or regularly visit their chosen carer; North Yorkshire Innovation Fund – which provides funding to support voluntary and community organisations providing innovative intervention or prevention measures; and Wigan’s place-based approach. To help innovative models to flourish and scale up, it identifies keys to success as: a shared ambition to embed person- and community-centred ways of working; co-production; a new model of leadership which is collaborative and convening; investment and commissioning in approaches which result in high quality outcomes; and use of data to drive change a willingness to learn from experience.

Comprehensive care: older people living with frailty in hospitals

NIHR DISSEMINATION CENTRE
2017

This review looks at the concept of 'frailty' in older people and what can be done to raise awareness amongst hospital staff, so that they can better identify and manage the needs of this ‘frail’ older people. It features 53 completed and ongoing studies funded by the National Institute of Health Research. The review covers four key aspects of caring for older people living with frailty in hospital: assessment; identifying and managing symptoms associated with frailty in hospital; discharge planning; and caring environments which consider the context in which inpatient diagnosis and treatment is delivered. The review highlights promising evaluations of workplace training and interventions. It also identifies a number of tools, such as the Frailty Index, that can help hospital staff to identify the severity of needs and help to provide targeted support. It also finds good evidence that the Comprehensive Geriatric Assessment (CGA) is a reliable way of diagnosing and meeting the needs of older people with input from multi-disciplinary teams. It also identifies areas where more research is needed, which include: maintaining activities of daily living for people admitted to hospital; and the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of different models of delivering care. The review also includes a series of questions that hospital boards, staff and families can ask about the care of older people with frailty in hospitals. Summaries of the 53 studies are also included.

Building bridges to a good life: a review of asset based, person centred approaches and people with learning disabilities in Scotland

McNEISH Di, SCOTT Sarah, WILLIAMS Jennie
2016

This review explores the potential to join up thinking on increased choice and control for people with learning disabilities and the principles of asset based working. Commissioned by the Scottish Commission for Learning Disability, it considers the efficacy of asset based approaches for people with learning disabilities, looks at evidence of the impact these approaches can have on people’s lives and also identifies examples of good practice in Scotland. The review draws on the results of a literature review; interviews with key informants involved in asset based working and learning disability services; and a mapping of projects using asset based principles with people with learning disabilities across Scotland. The results suggest that there are is reason why the focus of assets work cannot be broadened to include opportunities for people with learning disabilities. However it suggests that asset based approaches should be seen in the context of efforts to advance the personalisation and social integration agendas, and that if that they need to fit alongside services, support systems and initiatives. Examples included in the review illustrate how services can add to the assets of individuals and communities, provided they are willing and committed to relating to people and doing things differently. Factors identified that facilitate asset based approaches with people with learning disabilities, include: addressing wider inequalities and stigma; ensuring people with learning disabilities are active participants in place based community development; and tackling attitudinal barriers and established ways of doing things.

Unlocking the value of VCSE organisations for improving population health and wellbeing: the commissioners role

ATTARD Jessica
2017

This commissioners guide sets out a variety of approaches to working with the voluntary, community and social enterprise sector in order to create additional capacity for improving health and care that is person-centred and community-based. These approaches include adapting current commissioning processes, engaging the VCSE sector to develop more sustainable business models, and creating an environment within which new VCSE organisations or initiatives can be further developed and ‘spun-out’ to fill unmet needs. Based on interviews and learning from across the health and care system, the guide draws together examples of where this is already working well including examples from across London. It is particularly relevant for commissioners and service transformation and improvement leads delivering place-based care, public health and prevention, social prescribing, asset-based approaches and community development.

Asset-based commissioning: better outcomes, better value

FIELD Richard, MILLER Clive
2017

This publication provides an overview of asset-based practice and looks at the development of asset-aware and asset-based commissioning. It makes the case for adopting asset-based commissioning to improve outcomes for individuals and the community and outlines the implications for stakeholders, systems, behaviours and relationships of making this change. Asset-based commissioning is an approach which enables people and communities to become equal co-commissioners and co-producers and make the best use of all assets. The publication includes many examples of past and current innovations and looks at how they could be further developed and implemented at scale to achieve improved, economic, environmental and social outcomes. Key sections: look at the development of asset-based practice, its key principles and the role played by user-led organisations, personalisation, co-production and self-help ; examine how commissioning has evolved over the last three decades and how the current model is moving towards asset-based commissioning; and describe the paradigm shift involved in moving from conventional to asset-based commissioning and synthesises a wide range of asset-based commissioning practices into a unified model. The final section provides a guide to where and how to get started in developing asset-based commissioning and explores how to do this at scale.

Person-centred approaches: empowering people to live their lives and communities to enable to upgrade in prevention, wellbeing, health, care and support

SKILLS FOR HEALTH, SKILLS FOR CARE
2017

This education and training framework, commissioned by Health Education England, sets out core skills to support health and social care workforce to deliver person-centred approaches. It will help to staff communicate meaningfully, ensure they tailor the care and advice they give to suit peoples’ needs. It is applicable across services, sectors and across different types of organisations. The framework begins by describing the values, communication and relationship building skills that everyone delivering services should have to ensure consistent person-centred approaches. It arranges these into three ‘steps’: conversations to engage with people; conversations to enable and support people; and conversations with people to collaboratively manage highest complexity and significant risk. Within each step, the framework outlines behaviours which aim to illustrate what people and their carers would see in practice; learning outcomes; and short practice examples. Where appropriate, the framework encourages shared decision making and ensuring that all information is personalised, accessible and useful. The framework includes tips for delivering training and enablers for embedding a person-centred approach in organisations. The framework has been developed with the participation of health and social care experts and people who are experts by experience.

Flipping the narrative: essays on transformation from the sector's boldest voices

NEW PHILANTHROPY CAPITAL
2017

A compilation of 16 essays from innovative leaders in the charitable sector on how they are thinking about, and putting into action, new ways of achieving social change for the causes and beneficiaries their organisations. It includes contributions from leaders in national charities and smaller innovative organisations based in communities. The essays cover four key themes: strategy and governance – how organisational and governance change can support charities to deliver greater impact; the sector’s relationship with the public – the importance of trust and how charities can develop trust with the public; the sector’s relationship with the state – how to reframe interactions with the state and methods for forming more productive relationships, building on the strengths of the voluntary sector and their ability to understand the challenges of those accessing public services; and new networks and resources – building collaborations with new partners from different sectors and maximising the potential of new resources, such as digital technology and the voices and strengths of the communities they exist to serve.

Results 1 - 10 of 30

#EXCLUDE#
Ask about support on integration, STPs and transformation
ENQUIRE
News

LAUGH research project

LAUGH research project New practice example about a research project to develop highly personalised, playful objects for people with advanced dementia
View more: News
Related SCIE content
Related external content
Visit Social Care Online, the UK’s largest database of information and research on all aspects of social care and social work.
SEARCH NOW
Submit prevention service example
SUBMIT
What do you think about SCIE's work?
FEEDBACK
#EXCLUDE#
#EXCLUDE#
#EXCLUDE#