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Results for 'physical exercise'

Results 1 - 10 of 22

Interventions to improve adherence to exercise therapy for falls prevention in community-dwelling older adults: systematic review and meta-analysis

HUGHES Katie J., et al
2018

Background: exercise therapy is highly recommended for falls prevention in older adults; however, poor exercise adherence may limit treatment effectiveness. Objective: to assess the effectiveness of interventions to improve exercise adherence for community-dwelling adults (aged over 65 years), at risk of falling. Methods: eight databases were searched to identify randomised/quasi-randomised trials. The Capability, Opportunity, Motivation model of behaviour (COM-B) was used to categorise the identified adherence interventions. Studies with similar interventions that provided adherence outcome data per group were analysed to establish pooled intervention effect. Protocol registration with Propsero: (CRD42016033677). Results: of the 20 trials included (n = 4419), five provided data per group for adherence outcome. Meta-analysis of four studies (n = 482), containing interventions exploring the way exercise is delivered, demonstrated significantly better adherence in the intervention group (n = 166 experimental, n = 161 control Fixed effects model (FEM), SMD = 0.48 95% CI [0.26–0.70] P < 0.0001 I2 = 0%, very low GRADE evidence). Within this limited evidence base, interventions using telecommunication and the integration of exercise into activities of daily living appear most promising when delivering exercise at home. Meta-analysis to explore the effect that these interventions to improve adherence had on balance (n = 166 experimental, n = 161 control Random-effects model (REM), SMD = 0.82, 95% CI [−1.20–2.84] P = 0.43 I2 = 52%) and gait (n = 59 experimental, n = 56 control REM, SMD = 0.29, 95% CI [−1.62–2.20] P = 0.77 I2= 48%), found no statistically significant effect. Conclusions: adherence to exercise can be positively influenced; however, insufficient data exists to support any single intervention that also achieves effective outcomes for balance and gait.

Moving Memory

Moving Memory Dance Theatre Company

Moving Memory Dance Theatre Company, grew out of a commission in 2010-11, in the run up for the Cultural Olympiad 2012, to develop a dance piece with a group of older women. Following the event, a group of women wanted to continue the dance group so Moving Memory was formed. Skipping forward a few years, along with the performance pieces that Moving Memory creates for public events, they also deliver workshops, bespoke participatory projects and training. Moving Memory's vision is for a society where older people live longer, healthier and more fulfilling lives because they participate in artistic, creative and physical activities. The work they produce – and the way they produce it – aims to challenge perceived notions of age and ageing, by asking audiences and participants to look beyond their assumptions and changing attitudes towards older people.

A menu of interventions for productive healthy ageing: for pharmacy teams working in different settings

PUBLIC HEALTH ENGLAND
2019

This guide lists interventions that pharmacy teams working in different healthcare settings can use to support older people to improve the quality of their lives. It includes evidence-based interventions on: preventing and reducing falls; increasing levels of physical activity; maintaining a healthy weight and preventing malnutrition; reducing the risk of social isolation and loneliness; reducing the risk of dementia; supporting people diagnosed with dementia; delaying the progress of dementia and reducing the need for medicines. For each area the guide includes the rationale for intervention, a list of suggested interventions and evidence of impact. The guidance will also be useful for pharmaceutical and medical committees, local authorities, clinical commissioning groups and local NHS England teams.

Raising the bar on strength and balance: the importance of community-based provision

CENTRE FOR AGEING BETTER
2019

This report draws on work from the University of Manchester Healthy Ageing Research Group, which worked with communities to better understand the challenges of delivering strength and balance programmes for older adults in the local community. These activities could include resistance training, aerobics classes and yoga groups. The report argues that NHS falls rehabilitation services often don’t have the funding or ability to provide sufficient strength and balance programmes to meet existing needs, which means an effective community-based response is essential. The report presents different models of delivery of community-based activities, barriers to delivery and examples of innovative solutions identified during the project. The findings cover five themes: raising awareness, encouraging uptake, exercise referral pathways that work, sticking to the evidence, and monitoring for outcomes and improvements. Each theme highlights five key points to ensure that strength and balance exercise programmes are delivered to the right people, at the right time, and by the right people, so that older adults achieve positive results. Recommendations for commissioners, providers and health care professionals are also included. These include for NHS and local authorities support evidence-based programmes and for improved collaboration between those referring people to programmes and those delivering them.

A mixed methods case study exploring the impact of membership of a multi-activity, multicentre community group on social wellbeing of older adults

LINDSAY-SMITH Gabrielle, et al
2018

Background: Social wellbeing factors such as loneliness and social support have a major impact on the health of older adults and can contribute to physical and mental wellbeing. However, with increasing age, social contacts and social support typically decrease and levels of loneliness increase. Group social engagement appears to have additional benefits for the health of older adults compared to socialising individually with friends and family, but further research is required to confirm whether group activities can be beneficial for the social wellbeing of older adults. Methods: This one-year longitudinal mixed methods study investigated the effect of joining a community group, offering a range of social and physical activities, on social wellbeing of adults with a mean age of 70. The study combined a quantitative survey assessing loneliness and social support (n = 28; three time-points, analysed using linear mixed models) and a qualitative focus group study (n = 11, analysed using thematic analysis) of members from Life Activities Clubs Victoria, Australia. Results: There was a significant reduction in loneliness (p = 0.023) and a trend toward an increase in social support (p = 0.056) in the first year after joining. The focus group confirmed these observations and suggested that social support may take longer than 1 year to develop. Focus groups also identified that group membership provided important opportunities for developing new and diverse social connections through shared interest and experience. These connections were key in improving the social wellbeing of members, especially in their sense of feeling supported or connected and less lonely. Participants agreed that increasing connections was especially beneficial following significant life events such as retirement, moving to a new house or partners becoming unwell. Conclusions: Becoming a member of a community group offering social and physical activities may improve social wellbeing in older adults, especially following significant life events such as retirement or moving-house, where social network changes. These results indicate that ageing policy and strategies would benefit from encouraging long-term participation in social groups to assist in adapting to changes that occur in later life and optimise healthy ageing.

Evaluation of Ageing Better in Birmingham year two report

MORETON Rachel, et al
2018

Evaluation of Ageing Better in Birmingham, part of a wider programme of 14 Ageing Better projects located across England taking an asset-based approach to tackle social isolation and loneliness in older people. The evaluation covers activities completed between May 2017 and April 2018. It reports on the range of activities delivered, which included exercise and arts activities; key characteristics of successful activity; how networks are working to make their activities sustainable; and the ways in which activities are attracting male participants. Short case studies of the groups delivered are included throughout. Key findings show that Ageing Better in Birmingham is successfully engaging ethnically and age diverse participants and older adults who are the most-lonely. This has been achieved by mainly working through established voluntary and community groups, which it is noted may not always effective in those areas where the voluntary and community sector is less well developed. The evaluation found Network Leads play an important role in making a successful Network and that Networks involving physical activity appear to be associated with greater wellbeing gains for participants. The report makes recommendations for the future development of the programme.

Yoga-based exercise improves health-related quality of life and mental well-being in older people: a systematic review of randomised controlled trials

TULLOCH Alice, et al
2018

Objective: health-related quality of life (HRQOL) and mental well-being are associated with healthy ageing. Physical activity positively impacts both HRQOL and mental well-being. Yoga is a physical activity that can be modified to suits the needs of older people and is growing in popularity. A systematic review was conducted with meta-analysis to determine the impact of yoga-based exercise on HRQOL and mental well-being in people aged 60+. Methods: searches were conducted for relevant trials in the following electronic databases; MEDLINE, EMBASE, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, CINAHL, Allied and Complementary Medicine Database, PsycINFO and the Physiotherapy Evidence Database (PEDro) from inception to January 2017. Trials that evaluated the effect of physical yoga on HRQOL and/or on mental well-being in people aged 60+ years were included. Data on HRQOL and mental well-being were extracted. Standardised mean differences and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated using random effects models. Methodological quality of trials was assessed using the PEDro scale. Results: twelve trials of high methodological quality (mean PEDro score 6.1), totalling 752 participants, were identified and provided data for the meta-analysis. Yoga produced a medium effect on HRQOL (Hedges’ g = 0.51, 95% CI 0.25–0.76, 12 trials) and a small effect on mental well-being (Hedges’ g = 0.38, 95% CI 0.15–0.62, 12 trials). Conclusion: yoga interventions resulted in small to moderate improvements in both HRQOL and mental well-being in people aged 60+ years. Further, research is needed to determine the optimal dose of yoga to maximise health impact.

Reducing falls in older adults recently discharged from hospital: a systematic review and meta-analysis

NASERI Chiara, et al
2018

Background: older adults are known to have increased falls rates and functional decline following hospital discharge, with substantial economic healthcare costs. This systematic review aimed to synthesise the evidence for effective falls prevention interventions in older adults recently discharged from hospital. Methods: literature searches of six databases of quantitative studies conducted from 1990 to June 2017, reporting falls outcomes of falls prevention interventions for community-dwelling older adults discharged from hospital were included. Study quality was assessed using a standardised JBI critical appraisal tool (MAStARI) and data pooled using Rev-Man Review Manager® Results: sixteen studies (total sample size N = 3,290, from eight countries, mean age 77) comprising 12 interventions met inclusion criteria. Findings: home hazard modification interventions delivered to those with a previous falls history (1 study), was effective in reducing the number of falls (RR 0.63, 95%CI 0.43, 0.93, Low GRADE evidence). Home exercise interventions (3 studies) significantly increased the proportion of fallers (OR 1.74, 95%CI 1.17, 2.60, Moderate GRADE evidence), and did not significantly reduce falls rate (RR 1.27, 95%CI 0.99, 1.62, Very Low GRADE evidence) or falls injury rate (RR 1.16, 95%CI, 0.83,1.63, Low GRADE evidence). Nutritional supplementation for malnourished older adults (1 study) significantly reduced the proportion of fallers (HR 0.41, 95% CI 0.19, 0.86, Low GRADE evidence). Conclusion: the recommended falls prevention interventions for older adults recently discharged from hospital are to provide home hazard minimisation particularly if they have a recent previous falls history and consider nutritional supplementation if they are malnourished.

The association between physical activity and social isolation in community-dwelling older adults

ROBINS Lauren M., et al
2018

Objectives: Social isolation is an increasing concern in older community-dwelling adults. There is growing need to determine effective interventions addressing social isolation. This study aimed to determine whether a relationship exists between physical activity (recreational and/or household-based) and social isolation. An examination was conducted for whether group- or home-based falls prevention exercise was associated with social isolation. Methods: Cross-sectional analysis of telephone survey data was used to investigate relationships between physical activity, health, age, gender, living arrangements, ethnicity and participation in group- or home-based falls prevention exercise on social isolation. Univariable and multivariable ordered logistic regression analyses were conducted. Results: Factors found to be significantly associated with reduced social isolation in multivariable analysis included living with a partner/spouse, reporting better general health, higher levels of household-based physical activity (OR = 1.03, CI = 1.01–1.05) and feeling less downhearted/depressed. Being more socially isolated was associated with symptoms of depression and a diagnosis of congestive heart failure (pseudo R2 = 0.104). Discussion: Findings suggest that household-based physical activity is related to social isolation in community-dwelling older adults. Further research is required to determine the nature of this relationship and to investigate the impact of group physical activity interventions on social isolation.

A return on investment tool for the assessment of falls prevention programmes for older people living in the community

PUBLIC HEALTH ENGLAND
2018

This report presents results of a tool developed by York Health Economics Consortium to assess the potential return on investment (ROI) of falls prevention programmes targeted at older people living in the community. The tool pulls together evidence on the effectiveness and associated costs for four programmes where there was evidence of cost-effectiveness: Otago home exercise, Falls Management Exercise group programme, Tai Chi group exercise, and home assessment and modification. Based on an example analysis, all four interventions were found to be cost-effective, thus producing a positive societal ROI. One out of four interventions was also found to have a positive financial ROI (ie cost savings outweigh the cost of implementation). An accompanying Excel sheet allows for results to be tailored to the local situation based on the knowledge of the user.

Results 1 - 10 of 22

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Moving Memory

Moving Memory Practice example about how the Moving Memory Dance Theatre Company is challenging perceived notions of age and ageing.

Chatty Cafe Scheme

Chatty Cafe Scheme Practice example about how the Chatty Cafe Scheme is helping to tackle loneliness by bringing people of all ages together

Oomph! Wellness

Oomph! Wellness Practice example about how Oomph! Wellness is supporting staff to get older adults active and combat growing levels of social isolation

KOMP

KOMP Practice example about how KOMP, designed by No Isolation is helping older people stay connected with their families

LAUGH research project

LAUGH research project Practice example about a research project to develop highly personalised, playful objects for people with advanced dementia
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