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Results for 'place-based approach'

Results 1 - 10 of 18

CLS Evidence and Learning Briefings 2020. Paper 3: understanding the nature of change in delivering Community Led Support

CARRIER Jane
2020

One of six briefings to share evaluation findings and lessons from a project to explore the impacts of community led support across the UK. Community led support is a place-based approach to achieving change in health and social care services, through working closely with local communities and partners in the voluntary, community, business and public sectors. The paper draws on analysis of the second round of evaluation across sites who joined the programme between 2014-15 and 2018-19. It highlights ten priority actions to help to achieve, implement and sustain community led support. Key factors for success include knowing what works and doesn’t work in each place, what other related developments are already in place (such as Local Area Coordination, social prescribers and wellbeing coordinators), who the local players are right across the system (including in the community) and how best to work respectfully alongside them.

CLS Evidence and Learning Briefings 2020. Paper 4: Community Led Support: learning from stories of change

GIRLING Fran
2020

One of six briefings to share findings and lessons from a project to explore the impacts of community led support across the UK. Community led support is a place-based approach to achieving change in health and social care services, through working closely with local communities and partners in the voluntary, community, business and public sectors. This paper shares a sample of change stories from the perspective of people experiencing Community Led Support in a sample of places across the UK. The stories provide practical examples of how people have engaged with community led support and provide insight on what works and how this has been achieved. In the majority of change stories analysed, Community Led Support approach is enabling people to achieve their goals and improve their resilience and wellbeing. In many cases, this support has resulted in people feeling less socially isolated and more connected with their community, which in turn has increased their confidence and resilience.

CLS Evidence and Learning Briefings. Paper 5: Community Led Support in Scotland

HAYDEN Carol, BROWN Helen, TORRANCE Elaine
2020

One of six briefings to share findings and lessons from a project to explore the impacts of community led support across the UK. Community led support is a place-based approach to achieving change in health and social care services, through working closely with local communities and partners in the voluntary, community, business and public sectors. This briefing paper looks at the UK-wide headline findings and lessons in relation to evidence from Scotland, including how this can contribute to delivering the Scottish Government’s existing and emerging policy priorities. The findings show that community led support in Scotland is improving outcomes for individuals, achieving efficiencies for local Health and Social Care Partnerships (HSCPs), and is contributing to public service reform. It shows the benefits of public bodies and other partners working together around a shared vision and values to effect change.

CLS Evidence and Learning Briefings 2020. Paper 6a: Learning from local approaches to implementing Community Led Support in Somerset

HARFLETT Naomi, BOWN Helen
2020

One of six briefings to share findings and lessons from a project to explore the impacts of community led support across the UK. Community led support is a place-based approach to achieving change in health and social care services, through working closely with local communities and partners in the voluntary, community, business and public sectors. This briefing paper shares findings from the Somerset site to examine whether Community Led Support could deliver better outcomes for the same or less resource. Outcome data examined included: outcomes for individuals (e.g. wellbeing, physical and mental health, social isolation/connections); costs to adult social care and other related services; use of adult social care; and use of voluntary and community sector organisations. Evidence suggests that Community Led Support in Somerset has resulted in a range of positive impacts. The report also highlights findings from data drawn from an analysis of 4 other CLS sites in England who have been running for a similar length of time from 2014-15. A second, linked case study (paper 6B) will share findings and lessons from Scottish Borders.

CLS Evidence and Learning Briefings 2020. Paper 2: the big themes and messages from Community Led Support

NATIONAL DEVELOPMENT TEAM FOR INCLUSION
2020

A graphical summary shares the major lessons and messages from a project to explore the impacts of community led support across the UK. Community led support is a place-based approach to achieving change in health and social care services, through working closely with local communities and partners in the voluntary, community, business and public sectors. The project identified that community led support is making a difference in a variety of ways as it is implemented locally and also identified some common themes. These include importance of evidence and learning to the success of community led support, the importance of understanding local context and how to work with existing local players and communities, and the need for different kinds of leadership.

Community exchange and time currencies: a systematic and in-depth thematic review of impact on public health outcomes

LEE C, et al
2020

Objectives: Austerity in government funding, and public service reform, has heightened expectations on UK communities to develop activities and resources supportive of population health and become part of a transformed place-based system of community health and social care. As non-monetary place-based approaches, Community Exchange/Time Currencies could improve social contact and cohesion, and help mobilise families, neighbourhoods, communities and their assets in beneficial ways for health. Despite this interest, the evidence base for health outcomes resulting from such initiatives is underdeveloped. Study design: A systematic review. Methods: A literature review was conducted to identify evidence gaps and advance understanding of the potential of Community Exchange System. Studies were quality assessed, and evidence was synthesised on ‘typology’, population targeted and health-related and wider community outcomes. Results: The overall study quality was low, with few using objective measures of impact on health or well-being, and none reporting costs. Many drew on qualitative accounts of impact on health, well-being and broader community outcomes. Although many studies lacked methodological rigour, there was consistent evidence of positive impacts on key indicators of health and social capital, and the data have potential to inform theory. Conclusions: Methodologies for capturing impacts are often insufficiently robust to inform policy requirements and economic assessment, and there remains a need for objective, systematic evaluation of Community Exchange and Time Currency systems. There is also a strong argument for deeper investigation of ‘programme theories’ underpinning these activities, to better understand what needs to be in place to trigger their potential for generating positive health and well-being outcomes.

Community-centred public health: taking a whole system approach. Briefing of research findings

PUBLIC HEALTH ENGLAND
2020

A summary of research findings into current practice on approaches to community-centred public health, which are important to reducing health inequalities. Community-centred approaches mobilise assets within communities, encourage equity and social connectedness and increase people’s control over their health and lives. The briefing summarises the key elements, core values and principles that are needed to make a shift to whole system approaches to community-centred public health. It provides information on scaling approaches, involving, strengthening and sustaining approaches. The research briefing is one of a suite of resources to help local authority, NHS and voluntary and community sector (VCS) decision makers to implement and embed community-centred approaches to health and wellbeing at scale. Accompanying resources include a slide-deck presentation of main findings, practice examples and a list of alternative whole system frameworks.

Place, belonging and the determinants of volunteering

DALLIMORE David J., et al
2018

The article discusses findings from an ethnography investigating how volunteering in local associational life is changing, asking whether structural factors fixed in localities remain important or whether, as others have suggested, volunteering is becoming disembedded from place. Across two locations, how situational variables, including belonging, identification and interaction, remain important determinants of volunteering, and how the relationship between people and their localities has distinct meanings were observed. In one locality, people participated as volunteers because they had a strong sense of belonging; in the other, they often volunteered because they wanted to belong. Findings: local voluntary association is important in forming bridges between people in 'places' and wider society, but that differing notions of belonging mean that localities are not equally situated to operate as effective conduits. Conclusion: understanding these dynamics is important for outside agencies in delivering support and public services.

Health matters: community-centred approaches for health and wellbeing

PUBLIC HEALTH ENGLAND
2018

This resource focuses on the concept and practice of community-centred approaches for health and wellbeing and outlines how to create the conditions for community assets to thrive. It looks at the benefits of working with communities, in terms of improved outcomes and potential savings. It also outlines the range of community-centred approaches that can be used to improve community health and wellbeing. These include initiatives to strengthen communities; volunteering and peer support; collaborations and partnerships; and access to community resources. It highlights evidence, key policy documents and includes links to resources and case studies.

Tapping the potential: lessons from the Richmond Group's practical collaborative work in Somerset

NEW PHILANTHROPY CAPITAL
2018

This report captures early learning from a project to building meaningful collaboration between the voluntary and statutory sector in Somerset. It is the latest report from the Doing the Right Thing programme, which aimed to achieve better outcomes for people living with long-term health conditions and reduced demand on health and social care services through collaborative design and delivery. The report identifies benefits of collaboration and system change led by the voluntary and community sector. It also highlights some of the challenges around sustainability, measuring outcomes and ensuring involvement of large national charities is inclusive of the wider voluntary sector in a place. Key findings highlight the benefits of coming to collaboration with no pre-conceived ideas about products or providers; that turning an open-ended conversation between the voluntary sector and public bodies into a productive collaboration requires resource; the benefits of bridging organisations, such as the Richmond Group, and people who make it their job to connect divergent cultures, languages, and priorities; and the agility and stability that voluntary sector leadership can offer to place-based collaborations in a changing healthcare landscape. The report also discusses the wider implications of the research, and the issues it raises around health and care transformation, placed-based collaboration, and evidence for complex interventions. The report will be of particular interest to those seeking to improve collaboration and commission services across the health and care system and also provides practical insights into cross-sector collaboration.

Results 1 - 10 of 18

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News

Moving Memory

Moving Memory Practice example about how the Moving Memory Dance Theatre Company is challenging perceived notions of age and ageing.

Chatty Cafe Scheme

Chatty Cafe Scheme Practice example about how the Chatty Cafe Scheme is helping to tackle loneliness by bringing people of all ages together

Oomph! Wellness

Oomph! Wellness Practice example about how Oomph! Wellness is supporting staff to get older adults active and combat growing levels of social isolation

KOMP

KOMP Practice example about how KOMP, designed by No Isolation is helping older people stay connected with their families

LAUGH research project

LAUGH research project Practice example about a research project to develop highly personalised, playful objects for people with advanced dementia
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