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Results for 'planning'

Results 1 - 6 of 6

Housing our ageing population: learning from councils meeting the housing needs of ageing population

LOCAL GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION
2017

The suitability of the housing stock is of critical importance to the health of individuals and also impacts on public spending, particularly social care and the NHS. This report sets out what is required to meet the housing needs and aspirations of an ageing population, outlines the current policy context and presents detailed case studies of good practice to show how councils are innovating to support older people to live in their homes for longer and promote positive ageing. They include examples of integrated approaches to health, housing and care to support older people at home; care and repair schemes to provide support for older people in mainstream housing, long term housing planning; and developing appropriate new housing for older people. The case studies are from Birmingham City Council, Central Bedfordshire Council, Essex County Council, Mansfield District Council, Newcastle City Council, North Somerset, Bristol, Bath and North-East Somerset Councils, and Worcestershire County Council. The report highlights key lessons from the case studies: having a clear vision, promoting awareness and changing attitudes; housing planning, which meets local need and involves older people; delivering and enabling new housing for older people across the public and private sector; developing integrated approaches to housing, health and care; and sustaining older people in mainstream housing. It also outlines recommendations for Government, policy makers, councils, and providers.

Ageing Better: social prescribing and older people: guide to developing development project plans

HOY Christine
2014

Developed as part of the Better Ageing project, this guide provides advice on developing social prescribing plans and approaches as a way of tackling loneliness in older people. It highlights the importance of ensuring that social prescribing initiatives sustainable by engaging the support of local groups such as general practices, voluntary and third sector organisations. It also highlights key stages of developing any plan. These include: the importance of empathy and awareness when holding initial conversations to link people with support; mapping local assets, groups and activities; developing ways to find and use information about local sources of support; the collection of evaluation data; use of digital technologies in social prescribing; and presenting local plans using appropriate language and vocabulary. It also suggests key areas that could be covered in social prescribing plans, such as governance and accountability, plan for local evaluation, local collaboration and training and support needs. Includes a list of useful links and resources.

Implementing the Five Year Forward View for Mental Health

NHS ENGLAND
2016

Implementation plan which outlines a roadmap for delivering the commitments made in the Five Year Forward View for Mental Health to people who use services and the public in order to improve care. It prioritises objectives for delivery by 2020/21 and is intended as a blueprint for the changes that NHS staff, other organisations and other parts of the system can make. Key principles of the plan include co-production, working in partnership with local public, private and voluntary sector organisations; early interventions and delivering person-centred care. The plan also gives a clear indication to the public and people who use services what they can expect from the NHS, and when. It also outlines future funding commitments, shows how the workforce requirements will be delivered in these priority areas, and how data and payment will support transparency. Separate sections cover: children and young people’s mental health; perinatal mental health; adult mental health – including community, acute, crisis care and secure care; mental health and justice, and suicide prevention. These individual chapters set out national-level objectives, costs and planning assumptions. Chapters also describe cross-cutting work to help sustain transformation, including testing new models of care and ensuring the health and wellbeing of the NHS workforce.

Putting older people first: our vision for the next five years. A whole system approach to meeting housing, health and wellbeing outcomes for our older populations in South West England

OXFORD BROOKES UNIVERSITY. Institute of Public Care
2015

This document by the South West Housing LIN leadership sets out a vision for a whole system approach to meeting housing, health and wellbeing outcomes for the older population in South West England over the next 5 years. It highlights: the aims and objectives of the group; specific issues facing the sector in the region; and examples of innovative practice and the group’s priorities over the next 5 years. These include: supporting initiatives which contribute to more integrated approaches to service design and delivery; promoting the development of new models of care based in and around the housing services, taking the opportunities these present to develop community based, local services and highlight the benefits of taking co-productive and inclusive approaches to service design; building an evidence base which shows how housing and housing related services contribute to the wider health and social care agenda, through prevention, as well as supporting the management of long term conditions; raising awareness around dementia, including how housing organisations can enable people living with dementia, and their carers, to live independently within the community; and raising awareness about the potential that technologies offer in supporting older people to live independently, and seeking to address the barriers to wider adoption.

Building a business case for investing in adaptive technologies in England

SNELL Tom, FERNANDEZ Jose-Luis, FORDER Julien
2012

For many dependent adults, the provision of adaptive technologies provides a means to independent living and a decrease in the reliance on support from family members or more costly social care services. At present, the two main sources of state funding for equipment and adaptations are through Community Equipment Services (for minor adaptations up to a value of £1,000, such as grab rails) and through Disabled Facilities Grants (DFGs) (for major adaptations up to a value of £30,000, such as stairllifts or bathroom modifications). While costs of provision vary greatly by type of intervention, the majority of the research literature focuses on adaptations with an average value of approximately £6,000. The research described in this report provides an evaluation of the outcomes associated with the provision of adaptive technologies at an economic level, and, by extension. the likely impact of increases or reductions in investment in the context of increasing constraints on social care budgets. The analysis followed a three-stage process. The first stage was a systematic review of the literature in which the available evidence on the costs, effectiveness and outcomes associated with adaptive technologies was systematically collected and analysed. In the second stage, an analysis incorporating the findings gathered in the literature review was used to build a quantitative simulation model of the outcomes associated with aids and adaptations. At the final stage, the output of the literature review and model were used to inform a discussion around the policy implications. The research in this report was supported by a grant from Stannah and the British Healthcare Trades Association.

Predictive validity of tools used to assess the risk of unplanned admissions: a rapid review of the evidence

PATON Fiona, WILSON Paul, WRIGHT Kath
2014

A synthesis of evidence assessing the predictive ability of tools used to identify frail elderly and people living with multiple long-term chronic health conditions who are at risk of future unplanned hospital admissions. There are now a large number of models available that can be used to predict the risk of unplanned hospital admissions and this study aims to provide a summary of their comparative performance. Overall, the models identified in this review show reasonable concordance in terms of their predictive performance (based on c-statistics). Models reporting other performance indications showed that at different thresholds, as sensitivity increased, specificity would decrease. As the algorithms become more complex or incorporate longer term horizons specificity increased but the ability of the models to identify future high cost individuals reduced. It should also be noted that whilst the reported c-statistics are broadly similar, the underlying populations, data sources and coding may differ.

Results 1 - 6 of 6

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