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Results for 'play'

Results 1 - 5 of 5

Effect of board game activities on cognitive function improvement among older adults in adult day care centers

CHING-TENG Yao
2019

Stimulating leisure activities are considered as possible protective factors against dementia and cognitive decline in older adults, particularly due to the enhancement of cognitive reserve. This study tested the effectiveness of board game activities improving the cognitive function of older adults in adult day care centres. This was a quasi‐experimental study. A purposive sampling strategy was used to select 82 subjects who were aged 65 and above with intact mental functions and currently residing in adult day care centres. 41 subjects who participated in a selection of 12 board game activities were assigned to the experimental group and 41 subjects who adhered to their ordinary activities were allocated to the control group. Structured questionnaires of the board game programs were used for data collection. The board game programs showed promising effects in the cognitive function of older adults living in adult day care centres. A possible beneficial effect of board game playing on the risk of dementia could be mediated by a less cognitive decline in older adults. Board game activities may benefit the cognitive function of older adults. Incorporating board game activities into social work care may help develop long‐term care into a more diverse, unique and innovative direction.

Can lifelike baby dolls reduce symptoms of anxiety, agitation, or aggression for people with dementia in long-term care? Findings from a pilot randomised controlled trial

MOYLE Wendy, et al
2019

Objectives: To compare a lifelike baby doll intervention for reducing anxiety, agitation, and aggression in older people with dementia in long-term care (LTC), with usual facility care; and explore the perceptions of care staff about doll therapy. Method: Pilot, mixed-methods, parallel, randomised controlled trial, with follow-up semi-structured interviews. Thirty-five residents from five LTC facilities in Queensland, Australia were randomised to the lifelike baby doll intervention (three, 30-minute, individual, non-facilitated sessions per week) or usual care. Outcomes were changes in levels of anxiety, agitation, and aggression after the 3-week intervention, and short-term effects at week 1. Following intention-to-treat principles, repeated measure MANOVA was undertaken. Qualitative interviews involved five staff. Results: The doll intervention did not significantly reduce residents’ anxiety, agitation, or aggression when compared to usual care at weeks 3 (primary outcome) and 1 (secondary outcome). However, there was a significant group-by-time interaction for the outcome of pleasure – the doll group showed a greater increase in displays of pleasure at week 3 compared to baseline than usual care (F(1,31) = 4.400, p = 0.044; Cohen’s d = 0.74). Staff perceived benefits for residents included emotional comfort, a calming effect, and providing a purposeful activity. Perceived limitations were that doll therapy may only be suitable for some individuals, some of the time, and the potential for residents to care for the doll at the expense of their health. Conclusions: Doll therapy can provide some residents with enjoyment and purposeful engagement. Further research should focus on understanding the individual characteristics and circumstances in which residents most benefit.

LAUGH research project

Cardiff Metropolitan University

The Ludic Artefacts Using Gesture & Haptics (LAUGH) research project was born out of an identified need for playful objects for people with advanced dementia and based on literature and previous research on the benefits to wellbeing of playfulness and hand-use. The aims of the project were to look at: How can handcraft and creative making inform the development of new devices and playful activities to promote individual and social wellbeing for people with dementia? And how might handcraft activities be augmented via new technologies and smart materials to produce new kinds of engaging, playful artefacts to amuse, distract, comfort, engage, bring joy, and promote ‘in the moment’ living for people with dementia?

Using dolls for therapeutic purposes: A study on nursing home residents with severe dementia

CANTARELLA A., et al
2018

Objectives: Among the psychosocial interventions intended to reduce the behavioural and psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSD), doll therapy (DT) is increasingly used in clinical practice. Few studies on DT have been based on empirical data obtained with an adequate procedure; however, none have assessed its efficacy using an active control group, and the scales used to assess changes in BPSD are usually unreliable. The aim of the present study was to measure the impact of DT on people with severe dementia with a reliable, commonly used scale for assessing their BPSD, and the related distress in formal caregivers. Effects of DT on the former's everyday abilities (i.e., eating behaviour) were also examined. Method: Twenty‐nine nursing home residents aged from 76 to 96 years old, with severe dementia (Alzheimer's or vascular dementia), took part in the experiment. They were randomly assigned to an experimental group that used dolls or an active control group that used hand warmers with sensory characteristics equivalent to the dolls. Benefits of DT on BPSD and related formal caregiver distress were examined with the Neuropsychiatric Inventory. The effects of DT on eating behaviour were examined with the Eating Behavior Scale. Results: Only the DT group showed a reduction in BPSD scores and related caregiver distress. DT did not benefit eating behaviour, however. Conclusions: This study suggests that DT is a promising approach for reducing BPSD in people with dementia, supporting evidence emerging from previous anecdotal studies.

LAUGH: playful objects in advanced dementia care

TREADAWAY Cathy
2018

The article reports on an international research project led by the Cardiff School of Art and Design at Cardiff Metropolitan University to develop highly personalised, playful objects for people with advanced dementia. The aim of the project was to understand the best ways to design objects that can give pleasure and comfort to people in the advanced stages of dementia and to provide guidance for designers working in the sector. The article discusses the participatory approach to the research, testing and feedback and provides an example of one of the LAUGH objects that was found to have a significant impact on wellbeing - a comforting "Hug". The article also covers how the objects stimulate memories and some of the outcomes from the project and future direction.

Results 1 - 5 of 5

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News

Moving Memory

Moving Memory Practice example about how the Moving Memory Dance Theatre Company is challenging perceived notions of age and ageing.

Chatty Cafe Scheme

Chatty Cafe Scheme Practice example about how the Chatty Cafe Scheme is helping to tackle loneliness by bringing people of all ages together

Oomph! Wellness

Oomph! Wellness Practice example about how Oomph! Wellness is supporting staff to get older adults active and combat growing levels of social isolation

KOMP

KOMP Practice example about how KOMP, designed by No Isolation is helping older people stay connected with their families

LAUGH research project

LAUGH research project Practice example about a research project to develop highly personalised, playful objects for people with advanced dementia
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