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Results for 'policy'

Results 1 - 10 of 14

Public mental health: evidence, practice and commissioning

CAMPION Jonathan
2019

Based on a review of recent literature, this report summarises evidence around public mental health practice. Public mental health practice takes a population approach to mental health which includes three levels of mental disorder prevention and mental wellbeing promotion. The review covers: the impact of mental health problems and of mental wellbeing; risk factors for mental disorder and protective factors for mental wellbeing; groups at higher risk of poor mental health; effective interventions to treat mental disorder and to prevent associated impacts, preventing mental disorder from arising and promoting mental wellbeing; and economic savings of different public mental health interventions. It finds that despite the existence of cost-effective public mental health interventions, only a minority of people with a mental condition in England receive any treatment, receive interventions to prevent associated impacts or receive intervention to prevent mental conditions or promote mental wellbeing. It sets out a number of actions to improve coverage of evidence based interventions to reduce the population impact of mental disorder and promote population mental wellbeing. The report has been endorsed by the Association of Directors of Public Health, Faculty of Public Health, Health Education England, Local Government Association, Royal College of General Practitioners, Royal College of Psychiatrists and RSPH (Royal Society of Public Health).

Together in the 2020s: twenty ideas for creating a Britain for all ages by 2030

UNITED FOR ALL AGES
2020

This report presents 20 innovative ideas to bring older and younger people together and create a stronger society. The ideas cover three areas of public life: practical intergenerational projects, social and economic policies, and culture, media and sport. The report also highlights how intergenerational projects can change attitudes, improve older people’s health and care, tackle loneliness and increase trust and understanding between generations. The ideas include enabling more care homes to become community hubs; extending schools’ opening hours to provide community spaces for intergenerational activities; scaling up homesharing schemes for older and younger people; and the creation of a government department to join up and support intergenerational action. The recommendations draw on contributions from twenty five national and local organisations.

Strategy for preventing and ending homelessness

WALES. Welsh Government
2019

A policy statement setting out the approach the Welsh Government is taking to prevent and address homelessness in Wales. The Government aims to re-shape services around a rapid re-housing approach and towards long term housing led solutions, away from the provision of emergency, temporary and hostel services. The statement will be supported by an annual action plan setting out the measures which will be taken across Government.

The lives we want to lead: the LGA green paper for adult social care and wellbeing

LOCAL GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION
2018

A consultation paper from the Local Government Association, which seeks views on the future of care and support for adults and their unpaid carers. The paper puts forward options to secure the immediate and long-term funding for adult social care, and makes the case for a shift towards preventative, community-based personalised care, which helps maximise people's health, wellbeing and independence. It also considers the importance of housing, public health, other council services, in supporting wellbeing and prevention. Sections cover: differing views about the future of long-term funding for social care; the wider changes needed across care and health to bring out a greater focus on community-based and person-centred prevention; the role of public health and wider council services in supporting and improving wellbeing; and the nature of the relationship between social care and health, integration, accountability and how the new NHS funding could be used for maximum impact. Thirty consultation questions are included throughout the report. The consultation will run until 26 September 2018.

The key priorities to prevent and tackle loneliness and social isolation in Wales

WELSH NHS CONFEDERATION
2019

A briefing paper which outlines 20 key areas for the Welsh Government to consider during the consultation to build community resilience and support communities to combat loneliness and social isolation. The priority areas include responding into individual needs and developing a personalised response; supporting lonely individuals to access services, and providing differing levels of support - preventative, responsive and restorative support to help people re-engage with their communities. The priorities are endorsed by a wide group of health and care organisations.

What works in social prescribing?

CORDIS BRIGHT
2019

Based on a review of the literature, this evidence summary highlights the potential of social prescribing services to combat the root social causes of ill health and alleviate demand on healthcare services. The review provides a definition of social prescribing and outlines the key ingredients for successful social prescribing services. These key ingredients cover: funding, buy-in of health professionals, referral process, link workers, patient-centred care, collaborative working and integration between different sectors. The review also explores potential barriers to the widespread adoption of social prescribing services. It notes that robust evidence for social prescribing remains weak, with the majority of evaluations small in scale and poorly designed.

'What would life be: without a song or a dance, what are we?' A report from the Commission on Dementia and Music

BOWELL Sally, BAMFORD Sally-Marie
2018

This report examines the current landscape of using therapeutic music with people with dementia, outlines the value and benefits of music therapy, and looks at what needs to be done to ensure that everyone with dementia is able to access music. Informed by the Commission on Dementia and Music, the report brings together a wide range of evidence, including academic papers, written and oral evidence, and evidence from site visits. The evidence shows that music can help to minimise symptoms of dementia, such as agitation and can help tackle anxiety and depression. Evidence also shows that music can help improves the quality of life for people with dementia by increasing social interaction and decreasing stress. The report also shows that although the dementia and music environment is supported by a dedicated network of individuals and organisations, they work in a complex and poorly coordinate system. The field is also defined by sporadic access, with only relatively few people with dementia having access. It concludes that the sector would benefit from increased funding, further cost-effective research to boost recognition and funding, and increased public awareness about the benefits of music. The report includes recommendations to help improve access to music for people with dementia.

Housing adaptations

AUDITOR GENERAL FOR WALES
2018

This report assesses whether organisations with responsibilities for delivering housing adaptations in Wales - which include local authorities, housing associations and Care and Repair agencies - have an effective approach that delivers value for money. It finds that the current system needs to change in order to meet the needs of older and disabled people. The review involved fieldwork at five local authorities and four housing associations, a survey of people who had received adaptations; and an analysis of data and expenditure on current services. It reports that although users express high levels of satisfaction with housing adaptations, the system is complex, reactive and results in people with similar needs often receiving different standards of service because of where they live and who is providing the service. Although public bodies are aware of the benefits of adaptations in supporting independence, ineffective partnership working results in missed opportunities to address needs and avoid and reduce demand and costs in health and social care services. The report makes nine recommendations for improvement, including: for the Welsh Government to set a minimum standard for adaptation work, so people can receive the same standard wherever they live; for local authorities to work more closely with partner agencies who deliver adaptations and streamline the application and delivery processes; and the provision of more accessible versions of information to the public.

Chief Social Worker for Adults annual report 2017-18. From strength to strength: strengths-based practice and achieving better lives

Chief Social Worker for Adults
2018

This report sets out progress in improving the education, training and practice of social work with adults in England during 2016-17 and outlines priorities to further raise the quality and profile of adult social work in 2018-19. Themed around strengths-based social work practice, the report offers examples of social workers using asset and strengths-based practice approaches. It also reviews how adult social work is reshaping the culture of adult social care and the way organisations collaborate across health, community and voluntary sectors to maintain people’s quality of life and independence. It highlights a number of practice developments in the sector, covering strengths-based approaches, initiatives working to develop the social care workforce, integrated care, and work by hospital social work teams to reduce delayed transfers of care from hospital. Key priorities identified by the Chief Social Work for Adults for 2018-19 include promoting the value of social work practice with adults in personalising high quality health and social care integrated outcomes for people and their carers; to raise the quality of practice; and to improve productivity through social work practice that works in partnership with people to co-produce support.

Due North: the report of the Inquiry on Health Equity for the North

INQUIRY PANEL ON HEALTH EQUITY FOR THE NORTH OF ENGLAND
2014

This inquiry report sets out a series of strategic and practical policy recommendations to address the social inequalities in health that exist both within the North of England, and between the North and the rest of England. The inquiry, commissioned by Public Health England, was led by an independent Review Panel of leading academics, policy makers and practitioners from the North of England. The report identifies the main causes of the of health inequalities within and between North and South to be differences in the: poverty, power and resources needed for health; exposure to health damaging environments, such as poorer living and working conditions and unemployment; chronic disease and disability; and differences in opportunities to enjoy positive health factors and protective conditions that help maintain health, such as good quality early years education; control over decisions that affect your life; social support and feeling part of the society. The report provides recommendations on what agencies and central government need to do to reduce these inequalities. They cover: tackling poverty and economic inequality; promoting healthy development in early childhood; sharing power over resources and increasing the influence that the public has on how resources are used to improve the determinants of health and developing the capacity of communities to participate in local decision-making; and strengthen the role of the health sector in promoting health equity.

Results 1 - 10 of 14

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News

Moving Memory

Moving Memory Practice example about how the Moving Memory Dance Theatre Company is challenging perceived notions of age and ageing.

Chatty Cafe Scheme

Chatty Cafe Scheme Practice example about how the Chatty Cafe Scheme is helping to tackle loneliness by bringing people of all ages together

Oomph! Wellness

Oomph! Wellness Practice example about how Oomph! Wellness is supporting staff to get older adults active and combat growing levels of social isolation

KOMP

KOMP Practice example about how KOMP, designed by No Isolation is helping older people stay connected with their families

LAUGH research project

LAUGH research project Practice example about a research project to develop highly personalised, playful objects for people with advanced dementia
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