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Results for 'policy implementation'

Results 1 - 6 of 6

Wellbeing evidence at the heart of policy

HARDOON Deborah, HEY Nancy, BRUNETTI Silvia
2020

Improving wellbeing is widely recognised as a goal of policy and practice. This report sets out the state of the evidence and next steps for applying a wellbeing approach to decision making in the UK. It looks at what is meant by wellbeing and how it is currently measured in the UK and Internationally. It considers how wellbeing can be improved, including a review evidence of what works and tools those working in a policy context need to implement these findings. It also considers the challenges of implementing a wellbeing approach and the role businesses, communities and individuals can play. The final section outlines some of the issues which have yet to be tackled in order for wellbeing to become the dominant narrative which underpins the decisions taken.

Evaluating social care prevention in England: challenges and opportunities

MARCZAK Joanna, WISTOW Gerald, FERNANDEZ Jose-Luis
2019

Context: The Care Act 2014 placed a statutory duty on adult social care (ASC) to prevent and delay the development of needs for care and support. There is little clarity about how to translate this national obligation into effective local practice. Objectives: This exploratory study sought to lay the foundations for understanding approaches to this new duty by identifying: emerging local understandings of prevention; associated implementation strate­gies; and the potential for designing evaluation frameworks. Methods: Local perspectives were secured through: in-depth interviews in six English local authorities; reviews of local strategy, implementation documents and reviews of data sources; and methods for evaluating local initiatives in sampled authorities. Findings: The findings indicate important differences between and within local authorities in conceptuali­sations of prevention. Although willingness to commission services was strongly linked to the availability of evidence on what works in prevention, council conducted limited local evaluations. This study also found limited collaboration between ASC and Health in developing joint prevention approaches, in part due to differ­ences in conceptualisation and also constraints arising from different priorities and information systems. Limitations: The exploratory nature of the study and the small sample size limits the generalisability of its findings. Overall, the number of local authorities and respondents allowed us to explore a range of local views, opinions and practices related to the prevention agenda in a variety of contexts, however the findings are not generalisable to all English local authorities. Implications: This study suggests that the limited local evidence about prevention, combined with finan­cial austerity, may lead to disproportionate investment in a small number of interventions where existing evidence suggests cost-savings potential, which, in turn, may impact authorities’ ability to fulfil their statutory duties related to preventing and delaying the needs for care and support. In this connection, this study highlights the potential for developing local evaluation strategies utilising existing but largely unexploited local administrative data collections.

Tackling loneliness

BELLIS Alexander
2019

This briefing paper provides an overview of the Government's Loneliness Strategy, 'A connected society' (2018), which set out cross-departmental measures on how the Government would provide 'national leadership' to tackle loneliness in England. It also looks at the steps taken so far by the Government and research into the causes and impact of loneliness and possible interventions. It also briefly looks at loneliness strategies in Wales, Scotland and Northern Ireland.

Facilitators and barriers of implementing and delivering social prescribing services: a systematic review

PESCHENY Julia Vera, PAPPAS Yannis, RANDHAWA Gurch
2018

Background: Social Prescribing is a service in primary care that involves the referral of patients with non-clinical needs to local services and activities provided by the third sector (community, voluntary, and social enterprise sector). Social Prescribing aims to promote partnership working between the health and the social sector to address the wider determinants of health. To date, there is a weak evidence base for Social Prescribing services. The objective of the review was to identify factors that facilitate and hinder the implementation and delivery of SP services based in general practice involving a navigator. Methods: The search included eleven databases, the grey literature, and the reference lists of relevant studies to identify the barriers and facilitators to the implementation and delivery of Social Prescribing services in June and July 2016. Searches were limited to literature written in English. No date restrictions were applied. Findings were synthesised narratively, employing thematic analysis. The Mixed Methods Appraisal Tool Version 2011 was used to evaluate the methodological quality of included studies. Results: Eight studies were included in the review. The synthesis identified a range of factors that facilitate and hinder the implementation and delivery of SP services. Facilitators and barriers were related to: the implementation approach, legal agreements, leadership, management and organisation, staff turnover, staff engagement, relationships and communication between partners and stakeholders, characteristics of general practices, and the local infrastructure. The quality of most included studies was poor and the review identified a lack of published literature on factors that facilitate and hinder the implementation and delivery of Social Prescribing services. Conclusion: The review identified a range of factors that facilitate and hinder the implementation and delivery of Social Prescribing services. Findings of this review provide an insight for commissioners, managers, and providers to guide the implementation and delivery of future Social Prescribing services. More high quality research and transparent reporting of findings is needed in this field.

Making it happen: take action to get people with a learning disability, autism and/or challenging behaviour out of inpatient units. A guide for campaigners about Transforming Care Partnerships

MENCAP, CHALLENGING BEHAVIOUR FOUNDATION, NATIONAL AUTISTIC SOCIETY
2016

Guide to help local groups and individuals campaign for change to enable people with a learning disability, autism and/or challenging behaviour to move from inpatient units into the community. The guide highlights NHS England's promise in 'Building the Right Support' to close 35-50 per cent of inpatient beds and develop the right support in the communities by March 2019. It sets out the scale of the challenge and outlines the role of the 48 Transforming Care Partnerships, set up to implement NHS England's plans. The guide then provides advice on how campaigning groups and individuals can contact local Transforming Care Partnerships to find out more about their plans and find out what is being done to develop the right support. It includes a template letter to help contact local Partnerships; a checklist of key principles that should be included in Transforming Care Partnership plans; and a list organisations that can provide further support.

Making progress on personal and joined up support: report of a roundtable discussion. Implementing the NICE guideline on older people with social care needs and multiple long-term conditions (NG22)

NATIONAL INSTITUTE FOR HEALTH AND CARE EXCELLENCE
2016

This report summarises discussions from a roundtable event attended by older people and carer representatives, practitioners, providers and commissioners to identify how the NICE guideline on supporting older people with multiple long-term conditions and their carers could best be used and implemented. It also sets out practical examples, actions and ideas to help improve local practice. Small groups discussed how the guideline can help achieve three priorities that the Guideline Committee identified as most important for potential impact and the likely significant challenges. These were: empowering older people and carers; empowering health and social care practitioners; and integration of different care and support options to enable person-centred care. Suggested actions and practice examples in each of the three priority areas.

Results 1 - 6 of 6

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News

Moving Memory

Moving Memory Practice example about how the Moving Memory Dance Theatre Company is challenging perceived notions of age and ageing.

Chatty Cafe Scheme

Chatty Cafe Scheme Practice example about how the Chatty Cafe Scheme is helping to tackle loneliness by bringing people of all ages together

Oomph! Wellness

Oomph! Wellness Practice example about how Oomph! Wellness is supporting staff to get older adults active and combat growing levels of social isolation

KOMP

KOMP Practice example about how KOMP, designed by No Isolation is helping older people stay connected with their families

LAUGH research project

LAUGH research project Practice example about a research project to develop highly personalised, playful objects for people with advanced dementia
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