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Results for 'prevention'

Results 1 - 10 of 183

Loneliness and isolation in long-term care and the COVID-19 pandemic

SIMARD Joyce, VOLICER Ladislav
2020

Editorial. In all countries affected by COVID-19, the message that is being sent by government officials and medical experts is “stay at home” and “isolate in place.” The isolation is especially difficult for people living in nursing homes and assisted living communities. This article provides some easy to implement ideas, with little or no cost or hiring additional staff, and can decrease the loneliness of residents in nursing homes or assisted living communities The article concludes that preventing loneliness in institutionalized persons is at least as important as helping them with personal hygiene. This is especially important during the COVID-19 pandemic when residents must be protected from contact with other individuals to reduce the risk of infection. Implementation of some of the strategies listed in this article requires education of staff members and supply of required items; however, this effort can significantly improve the quality of life of residents affected by pandemic restrictions.

Delivering neighbourhood-level integrated care in Norfolk

COMMUNITY NETWORK
2020

This case study illustrates how integrated services are being delivered in Norfolk. Norfolk Community Health and Care NHS Trust’s vision is to improve the quality of people’s lives in their homes and community through the best in integrated health and social care. The trust works predominantly with 14 primary care networks (PCNs) across the area served by Norfolk and Waveney Clinical Commissioning Group (CCG), and with the Norfolk and Waveney Health and Care Partnership at system level. This includes collaborating with three acute trusts, one mental health trust, Norfolk County Council and the East of England Ambulance Service Trust. Examples of collaborative working include rapid assessment frailty team; early intervention vehicles, involving occupational therapists working with emergency medical technicians; Norfolk escalation avoidance team; and a high intensity user service. Key lessons emerging from this case study are: effective collaborative working requires good relationships across the board; do not underestimate the differences in culture and working practices between different organisations; invest in ensuring there is the right technology available for staff to use; engage with staff in a meaningful way to develop strategies to improve their health and wellbeing as this in turn will lead to improvement in services; and invest in pilot projects to test out integrated working between organisations but plan for how they can be maintained long term.

Falls Management Exercise implementation toolkit

NIHR CLAHRC. East Midlands, NATIONAL INSTITUTE FOR HEALTH RESEARCH
2020

This toolkit provides a suite of resources that commissioners can use to plan, implement and monitor the Falls Management Exercise (FaME) programme. FaME is an evidence-based tailored strength and balance exercise programme that has been shown to reduce the rate of falls, increase physical activity levels and improve wellbeing. The toolkit is an output of the PhISICAL study (Physical activity Implementation Study In Community-dwelling AduLts). Sections of the toolkit cover: Building the case for implementing FaME which includes evidence summaries for commissioners, a costing tool, a business case and real life case studies from FaME class participants; Planning the implementation of FaME, which includes an implementation Gantt chart, a service specification, example delivery models, videos, logic model and key learning from the PhISICAL study; Implementing the programme, which includes sample promotional materials and templates; and Monitoring, evaluation and quality improvement, which provides quality assurance guidance and suggested monitoring tools and schedule.

Signposting and navigation services for older people: economic evidence

BAUER Annette, et al
2019

Health, social care and other local government services can help ‘signpost’ or facilitate links to community and voluntary organisations that can help address social isolation and loneliness. This summary presents evidence on the effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of signposting and navigation to tackle loneliness experienced by older people. It draws on evidence from a systematic review funded by The Campaign to End Loneliness. The evidence suggests that signposting and navigation services have the potential to achieve positive return on investments. However, evidence is restricted to a few small-scale studies and modelling. Further research is needed to test those findings.

Never too late: prevention in an ageing world

INTERNATIONAL LONGEVITY CENTRE UK
2020

This report explores how health care systems can better prevent ill health across people's lives, focusing on people interventions among those aged 50 and over. It presents analysis focussing on a small number of diseases where preventative interventions by healthcare systems could make a real difference to people’s health and wellbeing. These are cardiovascular, lung cancer, type 2 diabetes and HIV. It also considers the case of flu. It presents a snapshot of the potential burden and cost of these diseases, such as costs due to sick days, presenteeism and early retirement. It also provides brief overviews of preventative interventions, which have the potential to help people live healthier for longer. The analysis presented in the report shows that failure to invest in prevention will bring substantial social, health and economic costs. It argues that in order to follow through on commitments to prevention, governments need to improve access to preventative interventions to tackle growing health inequalities; encourage populations, professionals and policymakers to promote good health and prevent illness; and effectively utilise technology to deliver preventative interventions.

Participatory arts, sport, physical activity and loneliness: the role of space and place

WHAT WORKS CENTRE FOR WELLBEING
2020

This briefing summarises the key findings from a qualitative evidence review into the role of place and space in enhancing wellbeing or alleviating loneliness when taking part in participatory arts and sport or physical activity. The review identified five key themes in the evidence base which highlight processes by which participatory arts and sport increase wellbeing and/ or reduce loneliness. They are: belonging and identity; relationships to community and locality; therapeutic and sensory spaces; safe spaces; and pace and rhythm of a space and place. The briefing concludes by suggesting how the evidence could be implemented.

A qualitative evidence review of place and space, intangible assets and volunteering and participatory arts and sport or physical activity for enhancing wellbeing or alleviating loneliness across the adult lifecourse (16+ years)

MANSFIELD Louise, et al
2020

This review identifies evidence on the role of place and space in enhancing wellbeing or alleviating loneliness when taking part in participatory arts and sport or physical activity. The review looked at studies published worldwide between 2009 and 2019, found 59 sources. The qualitative studies included focus on understanding and conceptualising place and space, wellbeing and/or loneliness in participatory arts, sport or physical activity. In these studies, five key thematic areas and their findings have been identified: (i) belonging and identity in place and space (ii) places and spaces of community and locality, (iii) therapeutic and sensory spaces, (iv) safe spaces and (v) temporal aspects of place and space. These themes point to processes by which participatory arts and sport operate to enhance wellbeing and/or alleviate loneliness. Based on the findings, the review has high confidence that places and spaces and placemaking are important in enhancing wellbeing and potentially alleviating loneliness by creating a positive sense of belonging and identity, community and therapeutic or sensory experience in participatory arts, sport or physical activity. It has moderate confidence that places and spaces and placemaking are important in enhancing wellbeing by creating safe spaces for those facing physical or emotional harm via participatory arts, sport or physical activity. It has moderate confidence that the pattern and timing of activities in places and spaces for participatory arts, sport or physical activity i.e. when, how long, who with and what types of activity occur, have a positive influence of wellbeing.

CLS Evidence and Learning Briefings 2020. Paper 3: understanding the nature of change in delivering Community Led Support

CARRIER Jane
2020

One of six briefings to share evaluation findings and lessons from a project to explore the impacts of community led support across the UK. Community led support is a place-based approach to achieving change in health and social care services, through working closely with local communities and partners in the voluntary, community, business and public sectors. The paper draws on analysis of the second round of evaluation across sites who joined the programme between 2014-15 and 2018-19. It highlights ten priority actions to help to achieve, implement and sustain community led support. Key factors for success include knowing what works and doesn’t work in each place, what other related developments are already in place (such as Local Area Coordination, social prescribers and wellbeing coordinators), who the local players are right across the system (including in the community) and how best to work respectfully alongside them.

CLS Evidence and Learning Briefings. Paper 5: Community Led Support in Scotland

HAYDEN Carol, BROWN Helen, TORRANCE Elaine
2020

One of six briefings to share findings and lessons from a project to explore the impacts of community led support across the UK. Community led support is a place-based approach to achieving change in health and social care services, through working closely with local communities and partners in the voluntary, community, business and public sectors. This briefing paper looks at the UK-wide headline findings and lessons in relation to evidence from Scotland, including how this can contribute to delivering the Scottish Government’s existing and emerging policy priorities. The findings show that community led support in Scotland is improving outcomes for individuals, achieving efficiencies for local Health and Social Care Partnerships (HSCPs), and is contributing to public service reform. It shows the benefits of public bodies and other partners working together around a shared vision and values to effect change.

CLS Evidence and Learning Briefings 2020. Paper 6a: Learning from local approaches to implementing Community Led Support in Somerset

HARFLETT Naomi, BOWN Helen
2020

One of six briefings to share findings and lessons from a project to explore the impacts of community led support across the UK. Community led support is a place-based approach to achieving change in health and social care services, through working closely with local communities and partners in the voluntary, community, business and public sectors. This briefing paper shares findings from the Somerset site to examine whether Community Led Support could deliver better outcomes for the same or less resource. Outcome data examined included: outcomes for individuals (e.g. wellbeing, physical and mental health, social isolation/connections); costs to adult social care and other related services; use of adult social care; and use of voluntary and community sector organisations. Evidence suggests that Community Led Support in Somerset has resulted in a range of positive impacts. The report also highlights findings from data drawn from an analysis of 4 other CLS sites in England who have been running for a similar length of time from 2014-15. A second, linked case study (paper 6B) will share findings and lessons from Scottish Borders.

Results 1 - 10 of 183

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News

Moving Memory

Moving Memory Practice example about how the Moving Memory Dance Theatre Company is challenging perceived notions of age and ageing.

Chatty Cafe Scheme

Chatty Cafe Scheme Practice example about how the Chatty Cafe Scheme is helping to tackle loneliness by bringing people of all ages together

Oomph! Wellness

Oomph! Wellness Practice example about how Oomph! Wellness is supporting staff to get older adults active and combat growing levels of social isolation

KOMP

KOMP Practice example about how KOMP, designed by No Isolation is helping older people stay connected with their families

LAUGH research project

LAUGH research project Practice example about a research project to develop highly personalised, playful objects for people with advanced dementia
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