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Results for 'prevention'

Results 1 - 10 of 193

A new deal for prevention

REFORM
2021

This Reformer Thoughts brings together experts from the scientific research community and the health care sector to discuss the benefits of a preventative approach to public health and the obstacles that stand in the way of its realisation. Conversations around preventative health have come to the fore during the COVID-19 pandemic. A spotlight has been placed on health inequalities and discussions on tackling the social determinants of ill health driven forward. Contents include: prioritising prevention and patient care during the COVID-19 crisis; prevention research – creating a healthier population and reducing health inequalities; we cannot become the victims of our success on HIV testing; how can screening programmes support the prevention and elimination of disease; cancer care, inequalities and prevention; how a world leading deal is helping prevent thousands of deaths from Hepatitis C.

Implementing the Care Act 2014:building social resources to prevent, reduce or delay needs for care and support in adult social care in England

TEW Jerry, et al
2019

This Report is based on research into ‘second wave’ approaches to prevention and capacity building that have become more prominent since the implementation of the Care Act 2014. These approaches involve a fundamental revisioning of the role of local services and seek to maximise resources and opportunities through working in more co-productive ways with citizens, families and communities. The findings are based on a national survey of local authorities and in-depth case study research with stakeholders, beneficiaries and family members in seven local authorities which were promoting one or more ‘second wave’ preventative initiatives. A key findings was that a preventative focus is still relatively new in adult social care and that approaches are often embedded within a variety of strategic initiatives, including: strengths-based models of social work and social care practice (such as 3 Conversations); approaches to social networking and building community capacity (such as Local Area Coordination); mobilising the resources of family and personal networks (through approaches such as Family Group Conferencing, peer support or Community Circles) and targeted ‘upstream’ use of personal budgets. Another finding was that overall, financial pressures were seen as the most important driver towards developing preventative activity, but, at the same time, this was also cited most frequently as the greatest barrier. Other frequently cited barriers to progressing the prevention agenda were competing policy imperatives and, in particular, perceived pressure to make rushed decisions in order to minimise delays in hospital discharge. The report also examines wellbeing outcomes and expenditure. The report makes recommendations for the policy, practice and implementation and evaluation contexts. The reports concludes that there is some strong evidence of the creativity and innovation that is taking place in a significant proportion of local authorities. While progress may not be consistent across the sector, the research shows that a sizable proportion of local authorities have been investing in activity that is designed to increase capacity and capability at individual, family and community levels, and thereby to contribute to preventing, reducing or delaying the need for adult social care services.

Local Area Coordination (IOW) evaluation report: “What is it about Local Area Coordination that makes it work for end users, under what circumstances, how and why?”

MASON James, HARRIS Kevin, RYAN Louise
2019

This evaluation report draws upon the findings of a realist evaluation of the LAC on the Isle of Wight (IOW) to establish how and why the programme worked for people and communities across three demographical areas. As a sample this focused on the first three Local Area Coordinators to mobilise LAC representative of Ryde, Shanklin and Freshwater. The methods selected for this study were made up of Q-method (Watts and Stenner, 2012) and realist interviews. Q-method focuses on subjective viewpoints of its participants asking them to decide what is meaningful and what does (and what does not) have value and significance from their perspective. Q-Method involves developing a set of statements representing a set of viewpoints of certain individuals about an issue or programme. In this case a set of statements about LAC on the IOW were produced and ranked in line with most important to most un-important by end users. These rankings were then analysed to produce holistic narratives illustrating shared viewpoints around how and why LAC worked. This was also supported by realist interviews which sought to further investigate the key mechanisms at play within LAC on the IOW. The findings of the evaluation established that listening, trust and time were consistent across the three Local Area Coordinators sampled in the evaluation. The coordinator also needs to continue to build on relationships with the differing referral groups due to the variety of methods used to make individuals aware of Local Area Coordination. However, it was also quite clear that LAC worked for different end users in different ways with the Q study creating three different subgroups of end users experiencing LAC: subgroup 1 – “I know you are there and that means a lot, but I’m building my own social networks”; subgroup 2 – “Thank you for your support, I’ve come a long way”; subgroup 3 – “I’m moving down the path, but I still need your personalised support”. The findings demonstrate that LAC works for different people in different ways. Within the spirit of the realist approach to the evaluation the three subgroup holistic narratives provide an insight into what works for whom in what circumstances and why.

Simply the best? Making Leeds the best city to grow old in

MELANIE HENWOOD ASSOCIATES
2020

Research exploring the local strategic policy context for meeting the care and health need of older people in Leeds, and how the Leeds Neighbourhood Networks understand and contribute to the agenda. The Leeds Neighbourhood Network (LNN), comprised of 37 locally led ‘schemes’ operated by a number of voluntary sector organisations, provides preventative support to older people in order to enable them to continue living independently and participate in their communities. They assist with a range of services and activities that promote the independence, health and wellbeing of older people throughout Leeds. This paper outlines the number of opportunities and challenges the LNNs face within the strategic policy context, and looks at the potential for Leeds to share more widely the benefits of its approach and experience. It describes how the LNNs are firmly rooted in their local neighbourhoods and understand the needs and preferences of local citizens they are in touch with and suggests there is an opportunity for them to develop a more outward looking style and connect people to a much wider range of community assets and resources. Furthermore, the LNNs could be more closely involved in supporting self-management for people with long-term conditions, and for health practitioners to benefit from being able to access groups of people needing support with diabetes, or COPD, or similar chronic conditions. Among the challenges, the paper cites the extremely diverse nature of LNNs, the risk that other third sector organisations perceive their own contribution to be less valued, the need to constantly adjust and tailor the ‘offer’ to reflect the changing needs of the older population, the lack of synergy between the LNNs and partners, the difficulties in implementing and evidencing strengths and asset-based approaches and the uncertainty about future funding and the direction of government policy.

Prevention in social care: where are we now?

WAVEHILL SOCIAL AND ECONOMIC RESEARCH, SKILLS FOR CARE
2019

This report draws together the main findings from a research study, which aimed to provide an overview of the published and unpublished literature relating to prevention in social care; consult with stakeholders to understand more about engagement with the prevention agenda; and identify examples of practice in England to learn more about how prevention is working in social care. The literature identified five key approaches to prevention: advice and guidance; physical activity promotion; social prescribing; reablement; and asset-based approaches. For each approach, the report provides a brief outline and examples of good practice. The report also looks at the interplay between prevention and the integration agenda, focusing on new care models, wellbeing teams, and new and emerging job roles; explores how to develop capacity in social care, through learning and development resources, use of technology, and commissioning and contracting; and examines the critical factors to effectively implement and embed prevention in practice.

Social determinants of health and the role of local government

LOCAL GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION
2020

This report explores what local government can do to improve health especially by tackling social determinants. Health improvement has always been a fundamental responsibility of local government and this was emphasised further with the transfer of public health responsibilities in 2013. The report argues that there is little use in simply treating people for a health condition if the cause of that condition is not also addressed. Tackling social determinants includes improvements in housing, education and employment as well as ensuring a health promoting environment. Each of the social determinants of health can be improved to give an overall improvement in the health and wellbeing of communities. The roles that local government undertakes to improve health through tackling social determinants include: civic leadership; as employer and anchor institution; securing services; planning and licensing; as champion of prevention. Local government actions and services are centred around the improvement of wellbeing and the prevention of poor outcomes – this is true for children’s services, adult social care and economic development among many others. Opportunities for health improvement by tackling the social determinants of health have been taken up across the country – the report includes detailed examples and case studies illustrating the opportunities for health improvement and what has already been achieved.

Evolving an evidence‐based model for homelessness prevention

OUDSHOORN Abe, et al
2020

While some progress has been made in addressing chronic homelessness through supportive models, a comprehensive solution for housing loss must include prevention. The purpose of this article is twofold: to conduct a review of the literature on the domains of the Framework for Homelessness Prevention; and to use literature on the concept of quaternary prevention, preventing the harms of service provision, to theorise an additional domain. The Framework for Homelessness Prevention draws upon theory from public health exploring primary, secondary and tertiary prevention, and also integrates primordial prevention. This leads to a typology of homelessness prevention that incorporates the following five domains: (a) Structural prevention; (b) Systems prevention; (c) Early intervention; (d) Eviction prevention; and (e) Housing stability. By systematically reviewing the literature we build out the evidence‐base supporting these domains. The team used research databases, internet searches and retrospective reference list reviews to identify high‐quality journal articles on prevention, which were then sorted by level of prevention. Through this process, we evolved our thinking on the Framework in considering that quaternary prevention was not initially included. Therefore, we explored the literature related to quaternary prevention in the context of homelessness and offer a sixth domain for the Framework: Empowerment. Ultimately, a comprehensive Framework for Homelessness Prevention will support communities and governments to more effectively prevent homelessness through upstream approaches.

Health matters: physical activity-prevention and management of long-term conditions

PUBLIC HEALTH ENGLAND
2020

A professional resource for local authorities and healthcare professionals on physical activity for the prevention and management of long-term conditions. One in three adults in England live with a long-term health condition and they are twice as likely to be amongst the least physically active. However, evidence shows that regular physical activity can help prevent or manage many common conditions such as type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease and some cancers. It also helps keep symptoms under control, prevent additional conditions from developing, and reduce inequalities. This guidance examines the health benefits of physical activity; its wider role and benefits, including social and community development and economic benefits; the scale of physical inactivity and the implications of health inequality; and the barriers to physical activity for those with long-term conditions. The resource also signposts to additional physical activity resources, programmes and campaigns for the public and to initiatives and training for healthcare professionals.

CLS Evidence and Learning Briefings 2020. Paper 1: programme findings and lessons about what makes Community Led Support work well for people and places across the UK

BROWN Helen, et al
2020

One of six briefings sharing evaluation findings and lessons from a project to explore the impacts of community led support across the UK, a place-based approach to achieving change in health and social care services, through working closely with local communities and partners in the voluntary, community, business and public sectors. The briefing highlights learning in relation to: local approaches to implementation; effective local leadership; the people community led support is reaching; and whether community led support deliver better outcomes for the same or less resource; and the factors that help to sustain it. The paper highlights five key messages, which include: the importance of understanding local context and knowing what works in each place, who the local players are and how best to work with them; and having the right kind of leadership, at all levels and across the system.

Total transformation of care and support

SOCIAL CARE INSTITUTE FOR EXCELLENCE
2017

This updated version of 'Total transformation of care and support: future of care', originally published in 2016, looks at how transformed and integrated health and care could improve outcomes and cost effectiveness of services. It outlines five areas where transformation needs to take place and where health and care systems can help older and disabled people build a good quality life. It identifies six well-evidenced models, which demonstrate how to combine scarce state resources with the capacity of individuals, families and communities. Using data from Birmingham City Council, it explores the potential for scaling up these six schemes, modelling their outcomes, costs and estimated financial benefits. It also highlights key enablers that could help areas implement each scheme. The models cover an initiative to help isolated older people; the Living Well scheme to improve resilience amongst older people; a service to support adults with learning disabilities to become independent; Shared Lives; a scheme to improve hospital discharge, and support for people following a hospital stay. Appendices include a template to help structure conversations with local citizens and stakeholders about transforming. It is the third of SCIE's Future of care series, which aims to stimulate discussion amongst policy-makers and planners about the future of care and support.

Results 1 - 10 of 193

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News

Moving Memory

Moving Memory Practice example about how the Moving Memory Dance Theatre Company is challenging perceived notions of age and ageing.

Chatty Cafe Scheme

Chatty Cafe Scheme Practice example about how the Chatty Cafe Scheme is helping to tackle loneliness by bringing people of all ages together

Oomph! Wellness

Oomph! Wellness Practice example about how Oomph! Wellness is supporting staff to get older adults active and combat growing levels of social isolation

KOMP

KOMP Practice example about how KOMP, designed by No Isolation is helping older people stay connected with their families

LAUGH research project

LAUGH research project Practice example about a research project to develop highly personalised, playful objects for people with advanced dementia
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