#EXCLUDE#
#EXCLUDE#

Find prevention records by subject or service provider/commissioner name

  • Key to icons

    • Journal Prevention service example
    • Book Book
    • Digital media Digital media
    • Journal Journal article
    • Free resource Free resource

Results for 'prevention'

Results 1 - 10 of 118

The (cost‐)effectiveness of preventive, integrated care for community‐dwelling frail older people: a systematic review

LOOMAN Wilhelmina Mijntje, HUIJSMAN Robbert, FABBRICOTTI Isabelle Natalina
2019

Integrated care is increasingly promoted as an effective and cost‐effective way to organise care for community‐dwelling frail older people with complex problems but the question remains whether high expectations are justified. Our study aims to systematically review the empirical evidence for the effectiveness and cost‐effectiveness of preventive, integrated care for community‐dwelling frail older people and close attention is paid to the elements and levels of integration of the interventions. We searched nine databases for eligible studies until May 2016 with a comparison group and reporting at least one outcome regarding effectiveness or cost‐effectiveness. We identified 2,998 unique records and, after exclusions, selected 46 studies on 29 interventions. We assessed the quality of the included studies with the Effective Practice and Organization of Care risk‐of‐bias tool. The interventions were described following Rainbow Model of Integrated Care framework by Valentijn. Our systematic review reveals that the majority of the reported outcomes in the studies on preventive, integrated care show no effects. In terms of health outcomes, effectiveness is demonstrated most often for seldom‐reported outcomes such as well‐being. Outcomes regarding informal caregivers and professionals are rarely considered and negligible. Most promising are the care process outcomes that did improve for preventive, integrated care interventions as compared to usual care. Healthcare utilisation was the most reported outcome but we found mixed results. Evidence for cost‐effectiveness is limited. High expectations should be tempered given this limited and fragmented evidence for the effectiveness and cost‐effectiveness of preventive, integrated care for frail older people. Future research should focus on unravelling the heterogeneity of frailty and on exploring what outcomes among frail older people may realistically be expected.

Disabled Facilities Grant (DFG) and other adaptations: external review

MACKINTOSH Shelia, et al
2018

This review, commissioned by the Department of Health and Social Care, looks at how the Disabled Facilities Grant (DFG) currently operates and makes evidence based recommendations for how it should change in the future. It review aims to develop more effective ways of supporting more people to live in suitable housing so they can stay independent for longer and makes the case for more joint working across housing, health and social care. The focus of the review is on how the disabled or older person can be put at the centre of service provision and what would make it easier for them to access services. It also looks at the role of DFG in prevention and how it can deliver this more effectively. It draws on a range of evidence, including: analysis of data from LOGASnet returns; consultation events attended by local authorities and home improvement agencies; interviews with staff from selected local authorities; and a short review of the academic, policy and practice literature. The conclusions and recommendations include: renaming the grant to reflect that it is part of a broader set interventions to help people remain independent; improved integration of services; better partnership working between health and care and different professions; raising the upper limit of the grant; and changes to the current formula for allocating funding; and updating of the existing means testing regulations. The review also identifies additional research to be carried out.

Economic evaluations of falls prevention programs for older adults: a systematic review

OLIJ Branko F., et al
2018

Objectives: To provide a comprehensive overview of economic evaluations of falls prevention programs and to evaluate the methodology and quality of these studies. Design: Systematic review of economic evaluations on falls prevention programs. Setting: Studies (N=31) of community‐dwelling older adults (n=25), of older adults living in residential care facilities (n=3), and of both populations (n=3) published before May 2017. Participants: Adults aged 60 and older. Measurements: Information on study characteristics and health economics was collected. Study quality was appraised using the 20‐item Consensus on Health Economic Criteria. Results: Economic evaluations of falls prevention through exercise (n = 9), home assessment (n = 6), medication adjustment (n = 4), multifactorial programs (n = 11), and various other programs (n = 13) were identified. Approximately two‐thirds of all reported incremental cost‐effectiveness ratios (ICERs) with quality‐adjusted life‐years (QALYs) as outcome were below the willingness‐to‐pay threshold of $50,000 per QALY. All studies on home assessment and medication adjustment programs reported favorable ICERs, whereas the results of studies on exercise and multifactorial programs were inconsistent. The overall methodological quality of the studies was good, although there was variation between studies. Conclusion: The majority of the reported ICERs indicated that falls prevention programs were cost‐effective, but methodological differences between studies hampered direct comparison of the cost‐effectiveness of program types. The results imply that investing in falls prevention programs for adults aged 60 and older is cost‐effective. Home assessment programs (ICERs < $40,000/QALY) were the most cost‐effective type of program for community‐dwelling older adults, and medication adjustment programs (ICERs < $13,000/QALY) were the most cost‐effective type of program for older adults living in a residential care facility.

Managing better: a critical prevention study

CARE AND REPAIR CYMRU
2018

A case study of Bridgend County Care and Repair's Managing Better service. The service is a three year programme funded by the Welsh Government, which has been co-produced by Care & Repair Cymru, RNIB Cymru and Action on Hearing Loss Cymru. The report shows how Managing Better is working across primary, secondary, and social care, to develop interventions and prevent avoidable pressures on public services. The service has a focus on increasing independence, reducing dependency and improving personal resilience. Individual case studies are included which show how Managing Better has operated in Bridgend and that by effectively targeting interventions service users' quality of life can be much improved and pressure on public services can be reduced. The case studies include services for patients moving from hospital to home patients, and helping people with visual impairment or hearing impairment to live independently at home. It is estimated that every £1 invested in Managing Better yields a £4 saving in other services.

Community connector schemes: Ageing Better programme learning

Ageing Better
2018

Reports on emerging evidence and learning from eight Ageing Better programme areas who are using Community Connector type roles. Community Connectors were defined as any mechanism that identifies isolated people over 50 and works with them to help them transition to less isolated through person-centred structured support. This includes community navigators, social prescribing and approaches that involve people overcoming specific barriers, for example mental health. The report provides some insights to policy makers, commissioners and practitioners to help them when shaping this type of service. This includes making the service work at each stage: entry points and first engagement, relationships building and activities, and moving on.

All the lonely people: loneliness in later life

AGE UK
2018

This report presents evidence about what Age UK know about loneliness amongst people aged 50 and over, what increases the chances of people experiencing loneliness and how best to help those older people who are persistently lonely. It focuses on the need for approaches to reducing loneliness to be tailored to the circumstances of the individual. The analysis shows that the risk of being often lonely is higher among those people who are widowed or who do not have someone to open up to. It also found that the risk of loneliness does vary because of age, although the risk factors may be different. Whilst social activities are an essential component of successful approaches to tackling loneliness, for many people activities are only effective when complemented by emotional and practical support to access them. This requires personalised support and neighbourhoods which encourage and facilitate people to participate in their communities. It concludes that the importance of good quality care, transport and other public amenities to achieve this means a genuinely cross-government approach is essential.

A society of readers

HILHORST Sacha, LOCKEY Alan, SPEIGHT Tom
2018

This report, commissioned by The Reading Agency, assesses the potential of reading to tackle the issues of loneliness, mental health problems, dementia and lack of social mobility. It looks at evidence in three short literature reviews and highlights findings from reading initiatives. It also forecasts the scale of the challenge posed by an increase in loneliness, mental health problems and dementia over the next decade without effective intervention. Findings from literature reviews suggest that reading can help to combat the growing issue of loneliness, as well as acting as a tool to protect future generations from the loneliness and can also improve common symptoms of both depression and dementia. It concludes by setting out thirteen practical reading-based policies that suggest how the Government can make the most of readings potential. These include for the Government to invest £200 million in using reading to combat loneliness and for more book-based interventions as part of a social prescribing strategy for mental health and dementia.

Occupational therapy fall prevention interventions for community-dwelling older adults: a systematic review

ELLIOTT Sharon, LELAND Natalie E.
2018

Objective: Accidental falls among community-dwelling older adults are preventable and increase the risk of morbidity, hospitalization, and institutionalization. We updated and broadened a 2008 systematic review examining the evidence for the effectiveness of fall prevention interventions in improving fall-related outcomes, occupational performance, quality of life, and health care facility readmissions for community-dwelling older adults., Method: Literature published from 2008 to 2015 from five electronic databases was searched and analysed, Results: Fifty articles met the inclusion criteria and were critically appraised and synthesized-37 provided Level I; 5, Level II; and 8, Level III evidence. Analysis was organized into four intervention themes: single component, multicomponent, multifactorial, and population based. Mixed evidence was found for single-component and multifactorial interventions, strong evidence was found for multicomponent interventions, and moderate evidence was found for population-based interventions., Conclusion: These findings can inform the delivery and integration of fall prevention interventions from acute care to community discharge.

Ageing Better: national evaluation short learning report: July 2018

CAMPBELL Diarmid, COX Korina
2018

Shares learning from the 14 partners of the Ageing Better programme, which aim to support people aged over 50 who are experiencing, or at risk of, social isolation and loneliness. The report draws on surveys of programme participants, visits to each of the 14 programme areas, and feedback from stakeholders from the partnerships. It reports that. to date, Ageing Better partnerships have worked with approximately 70,000 participants and 13,250 volunteers. The report also shows how Ageing Better, participants are, on average, less socially isolated and lonely, taking a more active role in their communities, have improved health and wellbeing, and are getting involved in delivering and designing projects. It also highlights benefits for volunteers and how Ageing Better is helping organisations improve partnership working and increasing skills, capacity and knowledge among participants helping to deliver and design programmes. Links to the partnership websites are also included.

Strategies employed by older people to manage loneliness: systematic review of qualitative studies and model development

KHARICHA Kalpa, et al
2018

Objectives: To (i) systematically identify and review strategies employed by community dwelling lonely older people to manage their loneliness and (ii) develop a model for managing loneliness. Methods: A narrative synthesis review of English-language qualitative evidence, following Economic and Social Research Council guidance. Seven electronic databases were searched (1990–January 2017). The narrative synthesis included tabulation, thematic analysis, and conceptual model development. All co-authors assessed eligibility of final papers and reached a consensus on analytic themes. Results: From 3,043 records, 11 studies were eligible including a total of 502 older people. Strategies employed to manage loneliness can be described by a model with two overarching dimensions, one related to the context of coping (alone or with/in reference to others), the other related to strategy type (prevention/action or acceptance/endurance of loneliness). The dynamic and subjective nature of loneliness is reflected in the variety of coping mechanisms, drawing on individual coping styles and highlighting considerable efforts in managing time, contacting others, and keeping loneliness hidden. Cognitive strategies were used to re-frame negative feelings, to make them more manageable or to shift the focus from the present or themselves. Few unsuccessful strategies were described. Conclusion: Strategies to manage loneliness vary from prevention/action through to acceptance and endurance. There are distinct preferences to cope alone or involve others; only those in the latter category are likely to engage with services and social activities. Older people who deal with their loneliness privately may find it difficult to articulate an inability to cope.

Results 1 - 10 of 118

#EXCLUDE#
Ask about support on integration, STPs and transformation
ENQUIRE
News

LAUGH research project

LAUGH research project New practice example about a research project to develop highly personalised, playful objects for people with advanced dementia
View more: News
Related SCIE content
Related external content
Visit Social Care Online, the UK’s largest database of information and research on all aspects of social care and social work.
SEARCH NOW
Submit prevention service example
SUBMIT
What do you think about SCIE's work?
FEEDBACK
#EXCLUDE#
#EXCLUDE#