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Results for 'prevention'

Results 1 - 10 of 179

Never too late: prevention in an ageing world

INTERNATIONAL LONGEVITY CENTRE UK
2020

This report explores how health care systems can better prevent ill health across people's lives, focusing on people interventions among those aged 50 and over. It presents analysis focussing on a small number of diseases where preventative interventions by healthcare systems could make a real difference to people’s health and wellbeing. These are cardiovascular, lung cancer, type 2 diabetes and HIV. It also considers the case of flu. It presents a snapshot of the potential burden and cost of these diseases, such as costs due to sick days, presenteeism and early retirement. It also provides brief overviews of preventative interventions, which have the potential to help people live healthier for longer. The analysis presented in the report shows that failure to invest in prevention will bring substantial social, health and economic costs. It argues that in order to follow through on commitments to prevention, governments need to improve access to preventative interventions to tackle growing health inequalities; encourage populations, professionals and policymakers to promote good health and prevent illness; and effectively utilise technology to deliver preventative interventions.

Participatory arts, sport, physical activity and loneliness: the role of space and place

WHAT WORKS CENTRE FOR WELLBEING
2020

This briefing summarises the key findings from a qualitative evidence review into the role of place and space in enhancing wellbeing or alleviating loneliness when taking part in participatory arts and sport or physical activity. The review identified five key themes in the evidence base which highlight processes by which participatory arts and sport increase wellbeing and/ or reduce loneliness. They are: belonging and identity; relationships to community and locality; therapeutic and sensory spaces; safe spaces; and pace and rhythm of a space and place. The briefing concludes by suggesting how the evidence could be implemented.

A qualitative evidence review of place and space, intangible assets and volunteering and participatory arts and sport or physical activity for enhancing wellbeing or alleviating loneliness across the adult lifecourse (16+ years)

MANSFIELD Louise, et al
2020

This review identifies evidence on the role of place and space in enhancing wellbeing or alleviating loneliness when taking part in participatory arts and sport or physical activity. The review looked at studies published worldwide between 2009 and 2019, found 59 sources. The qualitative studies included focus on understanding and conceptualising place and space, wellbeing and/or loneliness in participatory arts, sport or physical activity. In these studies, five key thematic areas and their findings have been identified: (i) belonging and identity in place and space (ii) places and spaces of community and locality, (iii) therapeutic and sensory spaces, (iv) safe spaces and (v) temporal aspects of place and space. These themes point to processes by which participatory arts and sport operate to enhance wellbeing and/or alleviate loneliness. Based on the findings, the review has high confidence that places and spaces and placemaking are important in enhancing wellbeing and potentially alleviating loneliness by creating a positive sense of belonging and identity, community and therapeutic or sensory experience in participatory arts, sport or physical activity. It has moderate confidence that places and spaces and placemaking are important in enhancing wellbeing by creating safe spaces for those facing physical or emotional harm via participatory arts, sport or physical activity. It has moderate confidence that the pattern and timing of activities in places and spaces for participatory arts, sport or physical activity i.e. when, how long, who with and what types of activity occur, have a positive influence of wellbeing.

CLS Evidence and Learning Briefings 2020. Paper 3: understanding the nature of change in delivering Community Led Support

CARRIER Jane
2020

One of six briefings to share evaluation findings and lessons from a project to explore the impacts of community led support across the UK. Community led support is a place-based approach to achieving change in health and social care services, through working closely with local communities and partners in the voluntary, community, business and public sectors. The paper draws on analysis of the second round of evaluation across sites who joined the programme between 2014-15 and 2018-19. It highlights ten priority actions to help to achieve, implement and sustain community led support. Key factors for success include knowing what works and doesn’t work in each place, what other related developments are already in place (such as Local Area Coordination, social prescribers and wellbeing coordinators), who the local players are right across the system (including in the community) and how best to work respectfully alongside them.

CLS Evidence and Learning Briefings. Paper 5: Community Led Support in Scotland

HAYDEN Carol, BROWN Helen, TORRANCE Elaine
2020

One of six briefings to share findings and lessons from a project to explore the impacts of community led support across the UK. Community led support is a place-based approach to achieving change in health and social care services, through working closely with local communities and partners in the voluntary, community, business and public sectors. This briefing paper looks at the UK-wide headline findings and lessons in relation to evidence from Scotland, including how this can contribute to delivering the Scottish Government’s existing and emerging policy priorities. The findings show that community led support in Scotland is improving outcomes for individuals, achieving efficiencies for local Health and Social Care Partnerships (HSCPs), and is contributing to public service reform. It shows the benefits of public bodies and other partners working together around a shared vision and values to effect change.

CLS Evidence and Learning Briefings 2020. Paper 6a: Learning from local approaches to implementing Community Led Support in Somerset

HARFLETT Naomi, BOWN Helen
2020

One of six briefings to share findings and lessons from a project to explore the impacts of community led support across the UK. Community led support is a place-based approach to achieving change in health and social care services, through working closely with local communities and partners in the voluntary, community, business and public sectors. This briefing paper shares findings from the Somerset site to examine whether Community Led Support could deliver better outcomes for the same or less resource. Outcome data examined included: outcomes for individuals (e.g. wellbeing, physical and mental health, social isolation/connections); costs to adult social care and other related services; use of adult social care; and use of voluntary and community sector organisations. Evidence suggests that Community Led Support in Somerset has resulted in a range of positive impacts The report also highlights findings from data drawn from an analysis of 4 other CLS sites in England who have been running for a similar length of time from 2014-15. A second, linked case study (paper 6B) will share findings and lessons from Scottish Borders.

CLS Evidence and Learning Briefings 2020. Paper 2: the big themes and messages from Community Led Support

NATIONAL DEVELOPMENT TEAM FOR INCLUSION
2020

A graphical summary shares the major lessons and messages from a project to explore the impacts of community led support across the UK. Community led support is a place-based approach to achieving change in health and social care services, through working closely with local communities and partners in the voluntary, community, business and public sectors. The project identified that community led support is making a difference in a variety of ways as it is implemented locally and also identified some common themes. These include importance of evidence and learning to the success of community led support, the importance of understanding local context and how to work with existing local players and communities, and the need for different kinds of leadership.

Quick guide: falls prevention and management in care homes

NHS ENGLAND. North
2019

A guide to help care home staff to manage and prevent falls and risk of fractures, with an emphasis on person centred care and continuous improvement. It looks a preventing falls through activity and exercise; risk factors in falls, risk assessment and screening, management following a fall, and the importance of education. The guide includes key references to national falls prevention in care homes best practice and NICE quality standards. It also provides links to wider resources and tools. The resource can be used to benchmark existing policies and procedures with care homes to ensure the care given reflects evidence-based practice.

Effectiveness of multifactorial interventions in preventing falls among older adults in the community: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

LEE Seon Heui, YU Soyoung
2020

Background: Falls often cause unexpected injuries that older adults find difficult to recover from (e.g., hip and other major fractures, intracranial bleeding); therefore, fall prevention and interventions are of particular significance. Objectives: This study aimed to examine the effectiveness of multifactorial fall prevention interventions among community-dwelling older adults and compare subgroups that differed in terms of their degree of fall risk and the intensity and components of interventions. Methods: An exhaustive systematic literature search was undertaken using the following databases: Ovid-Medline, Ovid-Embase, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (Central). Two investigators independently extracted data and assessed the quality of the studies by examining the risk of bias. This study conducted a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials that had been published up to March 31st, 2019, using Review Manager. Results: Of 1,328 studies, 45 articles were relevant to this study. In total, 29 studies included participants in the high-risk group, 3 in the frail group, and 13 in the healthy older adult group. Additionally, 28 and 17 studies used active and referral multifactorial interventions, respectively. Multifactorial interventions included the following components: exercise, education, environmental modification, medication, mobility aids, and vision and psychological management. Multifactorial interventions significantly reduced fall rates in the high-risk (risk ratio 0.66; 95% confidence interval 0.52–0.84) and healthy groups (risk ratio 0.72; 95% confidence interval 0.58–0.89), when compared to the control group. Active multifactorial interventions (risk ratio 0.64; 95% confidence interval 0.51–0.80) and those featuring exercise (risk ratio 0.66; 95% confidence interval 0.54–0.80) and environmental modification also showed significantly reduced fall rates (risk ratio 0.65; 95% confidence interval 0.54–0.79) compared to usual care. Multifactorial interventions had a significantly lower number of people who experienced falls during the study period compared to usual care in the healthy group (risk ratio 0.77; 95% confidence interval 0.62–0.95). Active multifactorial interventions (risk ratio 0.73; 95% confidence interval 0.60–0.89) and those featuring exercise (risk ratio 0.79; 95% confidence interval 0.66–0.95) and environmental modification (risk ratio 0.80; 95% confidence interval 0.68–0.95) had a significantly lower number of people who experienced falls compared to those receiving usual care. Conclusions: Active multifactorial interventions had positive effects on fall rates and the number of people experiencing falls. Thus, healthcare workers, including nurses, should be involved in planning fall prevention programs so that older adults can be provided with optimal care; multifactorial interventions that include exercise and environmental modification are particularly effective in reducing falls.

Interventions to prevent or delay long-term nursing home placement for adults with impairments: a systematic review of reviews

DUAN-PORTER Wei, et al
2020

Background: With continued growth in the older adult population, US federal and state costs for long-term care services are projected to increase. Recent policy changes have shifted funding to home and community-based services (HCBS), but it remains unclear whether HCBS can prevent or delay long-term nursing home placement (NHP). Methods: This study searched MEDLINE (OVID), Sociological Abstracts, PsycINFO, CINAHL, and Embase (from inception through September 2018); and Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, Joanna Briggs Institute Database, AHRQ Evidence-based Practice Center, and VA Evidence Synthesis Program reports (from inception through November 2018) for English-language systematic reviews. This study also sought expert referrals. Eligible reviews addressed HCBS for community-dwelling adults with, or at risk of developing, physical and/or cognitive impairments. Two individuals rated quality (using modified AMSTAR 2) and abstracted review characteristics, including definition of NHP and interventions. From a prioritized subset of the highest-quality and most recent reviews, this study abstracted intervention effects and strength of evidence (as reported by review authors). Results: Of 47 eligible reviews, most focused on caregiver support (n = 10), respite care and adult day programs (n = 9), case management (n = 8), and preventive home visits (n = 6). Among 20 prioritized reviews, 12 exclusively included randomized controlled trials, while the rest also included observational studies. Prioritized reviews found no overall benefit or inconsistent effects for caregiver support (n = 2), respite care and adult day programs (n = 3), case management (n = 4), and preventive home visits (n = 2). For caregiver support, case management, and preventive home visits, some reviews highlighted that a few studies of higher-intensity models reduced NHP. Reviews on other interventions (n = 9) generally found a lack of evidence examining NHP. Discussion: Evidence indicated no benefit or inconsistent effects of HCBS in preventing or delaying NHP. Demonstration of substantial impacts on NHP may require longer-term studies of higher-intensity interventions that can be adapted for a variety of settings.

Results 1 - 10 of 179

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News

Moving Memory

Moving Memory Practice example about how the Moving Memory Dance Theatre Company is challenging perceived notions of age and ageing.

Chatty Cafe Scheme

Chatty Cafe Scheme Practice example about how the Chatty Cafe Scheme is helping to tackle loneliness by bringing people of all ages together

Oomph! Wellness

Oomph! Wellness Practice example about how Oomph! Wellness is supporting staff to get older adults active and combat growing levels of social isolation

KOMP

KOMP Practice example about how KOMP, designed by No Isolation is helping older people stay connected with their families

LAUGH research project

LAUGH research project Practice example about a research project to develop highly personalised, playful objects for people with advanced dementia
View more: News
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