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Results for 'prevention'

Results 1 - 10 of 155

Community-centred public health: taking a whole system approach. Briefing of research findings

PUBLIC HEALTH ENGLAND
2020

A summary of research findings into current practice on approaches to community-centred public health, which are important to reducing health inequalities. Community-centred approaches mobilise assets within communities, encourage equity and social connectedness and increase people’s control over their health and lives. The briefing summarises the key elements, core values and principles that are needed to make a shift to whole system approaches to community-centred public health. It provides information on scaling approaches, involving, strengthening and sustaining approaches. The research briefing is one of a suite of resources to help local authority, NHS and voluntary and community sector (VCS) decision makers to implement and embed community-centred approaches to health and wellbeing at scale. Accompanying resources include a slide-deck presentation of main findings, practice examples and a list of alternative whole system frameworks.

Ageing better: working with older people to reduce social isolation and loneliness. A guide for Housing Associations

AGE BETTER IN SHEFFIELD
2019

A short guide providing evidence about what’s worked in reducing social isolation and homelessness among older people, focusing on work in the housing sector. It draws on lessons from some of the 14 partners who are delivering projects as part of the Ageing Better programme, which was funded by the National Lottery Community Fund. It identifies five key messages, which include for housing associations: to consider how they can strengthen their strategic and operational roles in addressing social isolation and loneliness; to develop an understand of local areas, mapping areas where older people are at most risk; to share their expertise in co-production to benefit local communities; and to consider further work with care homes for more long-term work to address loneliness and isolation. Although focusing on the housing sector, many of the themes identified have wider applicability to the design of any programmes seeking to reduce loneliness and isolation across all age groups.

What is the evidence on the role of the arts in improving health and well-being? A scoping review

FANCOURT Daisy, FINN Saoirse
2019

This scoping review maps the current evidence on the role of the arts in improving health and well-being, with a specific focus on the WHO European Region. Over 900 publications were identified, including reviews, systematic reviews, metaanalyses and meta-syntheses covering over 3000 studies, and over 700 further individual studies. Overall, the findings demonstrated that the arts can play a major role in the prevention of ill health, promotion of health, and management and treatment of illness across the lifespan. Within prevention and promotion, findings showed how the arts can: affect the social determinants of health, support child development, encourage health-promoting behaviours, help to prevent ill health and support caregiving. Within management and treatment, findings showed how the arts can: help people experiencing mental illness; support care for people with acute conditions; and support end-of-life care. The report raises policy considerations relevant to the cultural and the health and social care sectors. It concludes that the beneficial impact of the arts could be furthered through acknowledging and acting on the growing evidence base; promoting arts engagement at the individual, local and national levels; and supporting cross-sectoral collaboration.

Reaching out: guide to helping principal and local councils tackle loneliness

LOCAL GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF LOCAL COUNCILS
2019

A practical guide to help principal authorities and local councils to work together to tackle loneliness. The guide outlines the current loneliness policy context and uses a range of case studies to demonstrate effective models working in practice. It highlights four ways in which loneliness can be tackled at a local level: finding ways to reach and understand the needs of those experiencing loneliness; providing services that directly improve the number and quality of relationships that people have; providing support such as transport and technology to help sustain connections; and providing the right environment by creating the right structures and conditions locally to support those affected by, or at risk of, loneliness. Case studies include schemes to tackle loneliness and isolation in rural communities; older people's lunch clubs; supporting socially isolated adults and using tablet computers and video conferencing; and a model of Enhanced Primary Care. The guide includes useful check lists, advice on how to measure and evaluate outputs, and links to additional resources.

Community commissioning: shaping public services through people power

LENT Adam, STUDDERT Jessica, WALKER Trinley
2019

This report argues that if there is to be a move to a preventative system in public services, communities need to take on more responsibility for their own health and well-being. The report makes the case for why the process of commissioning of public services needs to be led by citizens and service users, not public sector professionals. It also explains in detail how this shift is happening in practice. The report suggests four key questions that public sector organisations need to consider when moving to a model of community commissioning: the nature of the service - will it be a statutory or non-core service; the nature of the commissioning network - will it be open to all residents within a geographical area only to those with a particular need or interest; the method of power transfer - formal or informal; and the depth of participation. It includes recommendations for central government that would help bring about this transfer of power to communities in the commissioning process.

Loneliness and the aging population: how businesses and governments can address a looming crisis

PALMARINI Nicola, et al
2017

This report explores the growing problem of loneliness in older people, current interventions, and ideas for future solutions. It draws on insights from interviews with a range of experts from six countries, including insight from medical professionals, social workers, academic researchers, technologists. The report focuses on why it is important for organisations understand loneliness and ageing, the triggers for loneliness, and why loneliness is so difficult to alleviate. It also looks at what is being done to alleviate loneliness in the ageing population today and potential future solutions. The report shows that for older people, loneliness is an emerging risk factor that has implications for personal, economic, and societal well-being. It identifies three areas for developing future solutions to address loneliness: detecting loneliness earlier and intervening earlier; helping people feel more engaged with others, and helping people rebuild social capital. It also outlines suggested actions for providers, business and employers. Short case studies of initiatives are included.

Strategy for preventing and ending homelessness

WALES. Welsh Government
2019

A policy statement setting out the approach the Welsh Government is taking to prevent and address homelessness in Wales. The Government aims to re-shape services around a rapid re-housing approach and towards long term housing led solutions, away from the provision of emergency, temporary and hostel services. The statement will be supported by an annual action plan setting out the measures which will be taken across Government.

Prevention: wrestling with new economic realities

KNAPP Martin
2013

Purpose : The purpose of this paper is to discuss the economic pressures on long-term care systems, and describe how an economic case might be made for better care, support and preventive strategies. Design/methodology/approach: Discussion of recent developments and research responses, with illustrations from previous studies. Findings: Economics evidence is highly relevant to decision makers in health, social care, and related systems. When resources are especially tight, economics evidence can sometimes persuade uncertain commissioners and others to adopt courses of action that improve the wellbeing of individuals, families, and communities. Originality/value: The paper uses long-established approaches in economic evaluation to discuss preventive and other strategies in today's challenging context.

The swing to early intervention and prevention and its implications for social work

GRAY Mel
2014

Social investment does not yet appear to have entered the social work lexicon yet reflects a shift toward early intervention and prevention and policies relating to early childhood education and care across the world. Recently, the prime minister of Australia announced new measures relating to childcare to ease the burden on working families and ensure high-standard care for pre-school children. Also announced was a mental health check to be administered by general practitioners for children as young as three years old. This change in social policy follows closely on the heels of the backlash against ameliorative welfare and move toward the preventive end of the social care spectrum. This paper examines developments leading to the social investment approach. It begins by defining social investment and providing an overview of key theorists contributing to our understanding of what ‘social investment is investing in’ and ends with a discussion of its implications for social work.

The lives we want to lead: the LGA green paper for adult social care and wellbeing

LOCAL GOVERNMENT ASSOCIATION
2018

A consultation paper from the Local Government Association, which seeks views on the future of care and support for adults and their unpaid carers. The paper puts forward options to secure the immediate and long-term funding for adult social care, and makes the case for a shift towards preventative, community-based personalised care, which helps maximise people's health, wellbeing and independence. It also considers the importance of housing, public health, other council services, in supporting wellbeing and prevention. Sections cover: differing views about the future of long-term funding for social care; the wider changes needed across care and health to bring out a greater focus on community-based and person-centred prevention; the role of public health and wider council services in supporting and improving wellbeing; and the nature of the relationship between social care and health, integration, accountability and how the new NHS funding could be used for maximum impact. Thirty consultation questions are included throughout the report. The consultation will run until 26 September 2018.

Results 1 - 10 of 155

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News

Moving Memory

Moving Memory Practice example about how the Moving Memory Dance Theatre Company is challenging perceived notions of age and ageing.

Chatty Cafe Scheme

Chatty Cafe Scheme Practice example about how the Chatty Cafe Scheme is helping to tackle loneliness by bringing people of all ages together

Oomph! Wellness

Oomph! Wellness Practice example about how Oomph! Wellness is supporting staff to get older adults active and combat growing levels of social isolation

KOMP

KOMP Practice example about how KOMP, designed by No Isolation is helping older people stay connected with their families

LAUGH research project

LAUGH research project Practice example about a research project to develop highly personalised, playful objects for people with advanced dementia
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